Truisms by Bob Lefsetz

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Truisms
by Bob Lefsetz – March 1st, 2014, 3:00pm
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2014/02/27/truisms
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Tumblr is for porn.
Facebook is for the wannabe famous.
Instagram is for those who are too lazy to write.
Texting is social currency. It doesn’t matter how many likes or friends or followers you’ve got, but how many people text you and how regularly, that’s how popularity is judged today.
Pinterest is inexplicable to guys.
Samsung is for those who hate Apple and those too cheap to buy an iPhone (not necessarily the same thing, Apple-haters will buy the most expensive Galaxy).
iPhone 4s means you’re almost at the end of your contract or you’re too cheap to upgrade.
Tesla means you’re more interested in status than utility, or you never drive far from home.
iPhone 5c means you think iPhones really cost a hundred bucks, not north of five hundred.
Windows means you got your computer from work or you’re too cheap to buy a Mac. Argue all you want, perception is everything, and perception is reality.
Hip-hop is the rock and roll of the Millennials. With a dollop of Gen-X’ers thrown in.
Rock and roll is the music of the baby boomers, who believe everything they’re into should last forever, but it doesn’t, just like them.
Books get a lot of publicity, but barely sell. Sure, there are exceptions, but very few.
Sales are irrelevant, streams are everything, but newspapers are only trumpeting Spotify plays when all the action’s on YouTube.
Albums are for the creators, no one else cares, except for a cadre of extremely vocal fans.
Terrestrial radio is an advertiser-laden medium for poor people. Anybody with an income is listening to satellite or streaming from their mobile device.
Baby boomers buy Japanese automobiles because they remember how bad their parents’ Detroit iron was. In other words, despite all the press that GM, Ford and Chrysler are improving, boomers are sticking to Toyota and Honda, at least in California, and trends still start in California, don’t ever forget it.
Binge viewing is a badge of honor. Telling everybody you stayed home to watch all the episodes of _______ garners more status than saying you went to the show, and there’s more to talk about!
The Millennials want to be famous, just watch Douglas Rushkoff’s documentary “Generation Like“.
Newspapers insist on fat profit margins and head for decrepitude while online sites focus on user experience first and profits last. In other words, it’s the product, stupid!
Companies are constantly fighting for awareness.
Ignorance reigns. Education comes through word of mouth, which also spreads falsehoods. He who knows the most truth wins. We live in an information society, what’s in your brain is paramount.
Without relationships you cannot succeed.
Here today, gone tomorrow, welcome to the twenty first century. You can only combat this by constantly producing. U2 released a single during the Super Bowl, it’s already been forgotten, assuming you knew its name to begin with.
No one cares if Shia LaBeouf wears a bag on his head, it’s a trumped up media story.
Robin Thicke will screw everything that moves, wake up and realize his career is over and lament the loss of his wife.
Alec Baldwin was right about Harvey Levin, but if you think he’s retiring from public life, you believe Kim Kardashian is all natural. That’s what Alec does, turn it on in the public eye, without this oxygen he’s dead, so he’ll be back, just like Scott Shannon, ha! (“Alec Baldwin: Good-bye, Public Life“)
Just because you get press for your celebrity cook/lifestyle book, don’t think we care, you’re just another loser like us. In other words, just because you promote it, that does not mean it will sell.
Bitcoin may not be forever, but digital currency is.
Marc Andreesen is a borderline blowhard who is pontificating on tech better than most, pay attention to what he says.
You know Twitter is in crisis when regular tweeters like Michael Moore don’t.
Apple is not going to revolutionize television. Content owners won’t let them.
Manhattan is losing steam as an arts center, it’s just too expensive to live there. In other words, bankers can prop up institutions, but they cannot drive them forward.
Millennials are not mad that technologists are crowding them out of San Francisco as much as they are that they too are not rich.
Bill Gates cannot save Microsoft. Samsung is a better me-too company. Vision is everything today.
Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook. They control the world, consolidation has taken hold, it’s the next hot topic and you don’t know it yet.
People give up when no one’s paying attention, whether it be music, MySpace, Facebook, Twitter… Like hula-hoops, they’re fads, interesting for a while, then abandoned.
Just because something makes money, that does not mean it does not suck.
 
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Celebrate in February: Valentine Clip Art – Presidents Day – St. Brigid's Day

VALENTINE CLIPART— FREE TO USE! *Wonderful* Valentine clipart–free to use! It has hearts, cupids, backgrounds, and even animations.
 
PRESIDENTS DAY CHILDREN’S SONGS: THE PRESIDENTS SONG
 
IMBOLC February 1st St. Brigid’s Day!
The day of the gin-i-ker (tine caor) and jazz (teas).

NYT The Learning Netwotk: Songs in the Key of Lit: Ways to Use Music to Study Literature

NYT The Learning Netwotk: Songs in the Key of Lit: Ways to Use Music to Study Literature

Overview | How can music help illuminate literature? And how can literature teach us about music? In this lesson, students read a review of a musical performance based on Plato’s dialogues and then set a literary work they have studied to music in order to bring out or enhance its meaning.
http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/04/songs-in-the-key-of-lit-ways-to-use-music-to-study-literature/?_r=0
 

AROUND THE WEB

Artist Armand Mednick one of the best Art Teachers in the world

Artist Armand Mednick one of the best Art Teachers in the world.

The art and life of Carol Saylor and Armand Mednick
They’re 75 and 80, they met at an art class for the blind, and they see clearly that life is passionate and precious.
The sculpture class at Allens Lane Art Center in Mount Airy is in full swing. One student is glazing. Another is wedging clay to remove air bubbles.
Occasionally the group walks around to look at one another’s work, although “look” in this case means gently feeling it with their fingers. It is a tactile experience by necessity: All the participants in this class are legally blind or visually impaired.
While the class is a story in and of itself – it has been offered for 57 years, now in its third venue – this is not a tale about how blind artists find their way around an art studio. It is, however, about how a student and teacher found each other, “about falling madly, totally in love when I thought it could never happen again,” says Armand Mednick, 80, the class’ co-instructor.
He is referring to Carol Saylor, 75, a watercolorist until she started to lose both her sight and her hearing in her mid-40s. Saylor is now a sculptor. Both she and Mednick graduated from Tyler School of Art in Elkins Park, but at different times – Mednick in 1958 with a degree in graphics and ceramics, and Saylor in 1976 with a degree in painting – and they had never met until Saylor showed up for class in October.
Holocaust Testimony of Armand Mednick: Transcript of Audiotaped Interview
Mr. Mednick, named “Avrum” by his Yiddish-speaking parents, was born in 1933 into a close, extended family in Brussels, Belgium. He grew up as a stranger in a non-Jewish neighborhood, often taunted by antisemites influenced by the fascist Rex Party. At age six, he was hospitalized with tuberculosis until May, 1940, when his father, an active political leftist, fled with his family to France. His father was drafted into the French Army, deserted and placed his son, renamed “Armand”, in a sanitarium at Clermont-Ferrand in the Auvergne Mountains. Armand’s father, mother and baby sister hid nearby in Volvic, where they passed as Christians. When Armand recovered, he joined his family and attended Catholic school.

Armand Mednick, 75 , with the book &quot;The Secret Seder&quot; by Doreen Rappaport, who was inspired by his father's memoir. Armand Mednick, 75 , with the book
“The Secret Seder” by Doreen Rappaport, who was inspired by his father’s memoir.
Artist Armand Mednick one of the best teachers in the world.
One of my favorite people is Armand Mednick. He is and artist and taught us how to throw pots on the potters wheel, glaze them, fire them up in a kiln and feel great about this. My pots made me happy, and Armand (yes we were allowed to call him by his first name) was one of the best teachers I ever had in my whole life!
Armand was very exotic, had a very dark curly beard, walked around in loose fitting, stained messy clothes, rough and ready, with bright shiny kind eyes, a smile speaking with a french accent.
Armand was probably one of the first older men who I trusted, because I knew he told me/us the real truth about how the world worked. Not the lies told to children to spare them the ugliness we know is all around us, but the truth that confirmed the realities of the world.
There were times when all we did in art class was sit there while he told us stories about his life in Europe during world war two and how he struggled to stay alive, and fought in the underground against Nazi’s.
I don’t remember any other adults telling us serious personal stories about people, places, politics, and war.  Armand was genuine, he was sincere. I connected to a Culture Keeper, with the Oral tradition who told us the truth.
This was a teacher!
 
 
Philadelphia Inquirer article Daniel Rubin: History comes calling for boy in the woods
Contact Daniel Rubin at 215-854-5917 or drubin@phillynews.com.
It’s almost impossible to have graduated from Oak Lane without hearing this story.
This was Armand Mednick’s signature tale. You can imagine how astonished he was to
get a phone call from his sister in Florida last spring and learn of a book called
The Secret Seder, about a boy who sneaks into the woods to celebrate Passover.
It’s Armand Mednick’s story. Author Doreen Rappaport had read about it in Mednick’s
late father’s 1997 memoir, Never Be Afraid: A Jew in the Maquis.
But many of Rappaport’s details are different from what Armand Mednick remembers.
That’s because Rappaport had been unable to track down the young protagonist,
who had shortened his last name from his father’s Mednicki.
Last spring Oak Lane music teacher Marlis Kraft-Zemel e-mailed Rappaport to tell her of
Mednick, who for 48 years has taught at the Blue Bell private school in an attempt,
he says, to recapture his lost youth.
At a reading of
The Secret Seder held in the school last month,
Rappaport described her reaction to the news:
“I ran screaming through the house, shouting for my husband . . . ‘He’s here!
I’ve found him. The Secret Seder boy. He’s alive!’ “

I sat with that boy, now 75, one day last week in the barn where he
throws pots and teaches art history. <snip>
 
Doreen Rappaport
read Bernard Mednicki’s account that became the inspiration
for her children’s book, The Secret Seder.

She is known for writing about issues of social justice and the lives touched by this.
Doreen Rappaport will meet Armand Mednick who was the little boy she wrote about and honor his
story.

For those of you who love a good story, here is one for the books-literally!
This is the story of a young boy who would grow up to become a beloved art teacher.
As a young child during WWII, Oak Lane Day School’s art teacher, Armand Mednick lived with his family in
France hiding from the Nazis under an assumed name. During that time, Armand and his father
attended a secret Seder, which Armand’s father would later describe in his memoirs.
Doreen Rappaport is an accomplished author living in New York whose books include the Caldecott Honor Book. 

LEARNING GUIDE:
The Secret Seder

  1. Why does Jacques cross himself in front of the church?
  2. Why does Jacques want to go to the Seder?
  3. Why do the men have to celebrate in secret?
  4. What does the old man mean when he says, “This is a dark time for our people?”
  5. When the men say, “Next year in Yerushalayim.” what are they hoping for?
  6. How do you think Jacques felt walking down the mountain with his father?
  7. Was Jacques brave to go to the Seder? Explain why or why not.
  8. How do the illustrations help tell the story?
  9. What differences are there between the illustrations in the village and the illustrations at the Seder?
  10. Explain the meaning of: Seder; “black boot men”; prophet; matzah; Pharaoh; Holocaust.


Other Famous people associated with Oak Lane Day School
On December 7, 1928, Avram Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
He attended Oak Lane Country Day School, and later Central High School.
About Oaklane Day School – formally Oaklane County Day School
The present-day Oak Lane Day School, located in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania,

was founded in 1916 in Cheltenham Township, under the name Oak Lane

Country Day School, by a group of parents and educators interested in

the Progressive Education movement. Originally organized as a coeducational,

non-sectarian, kindergarten through grade 12 school, Oak Lane evolved into

a pre-kindergarten through grade 6 elementary school. Initially affiliated

with the University of Pennsylvania as a “school of observation,” Oak Lane

was acquired in the 1930’s by Temple University, which continued the

school as part of its teacher training program, a relationship that would

last until 1960. The ideal of individualized education to serve a diverse

and inclusive student population has shaped Oak Lane to this day.

Our teaching heritage includes a strong emphasis on the arts and music.
 
In 1960, no longer associated with Temple, Oak Lane was renamed and

incorporated as an independent school by dedicated and tenacious parents,

faculty and staff at a leased building in Glenside, and moved to its present

30-acre site in Blue Bell in 1964. Oak Lane Day School is accredited by the
Pennsylvania Association of Independent Schools, and is a member of the

National Association of Independent Schools and the

Association of Delaware Valley Independent Schools.
 
Oak Lane is nestled on a 30-acre country campus in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania.

Mexican Pointy Boots Tribal Music Stand Out

Oooooh Mexican Pointy Boots

Mexico Tribal Music and Pointy Boots
Tribal Music Brought The Best Pointy Boots Ever!

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=veQkt4tS0Tc]

The Mexican party scene has fully embraced ridiculously long pointy boots and tribal music. In this episode of VICE Presents, we explore the pointiest boots on the planet and the culture to which they are tied.
Spreading North into Texas, Tennessee, Oklahoma, and any place where big groups of immigrant Mexicans have taken root.

MORE

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUXAvpP1Usw]

 

Mexican Pointy Boots: Xavier Glowing at the OK Corral
Xavier modifies his boots to dance Tribal at the clubs in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcteaZKdV_s]

Tribal Pointy Boots Mesquit Rodeo

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IC0xAwIfX44]

 

Mexican Town Goes Mad for Pointy Boots

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fMSZh2mglM]

 

 

HALLOWEEN FACTS, SONGS, FILM, CULTURE, HISTORY AND OTHER MUSIC HOLIDAYS WE CELEBRATE

Fun Holloween Songs
Halloween Songs, Halloween History, Halloween Safety, Ghost, Goblin Monster Scary Spooky Sounds, Pumpkin Facts,  Celtic History, Werewolf Protection and Dracula, Ghosts and Music Holidays.
It ain’t no sin
To take off your skin
And dance around in your bones. Fats Waller
Halloween as it emerged from the Celtic festival of Samhain (summer’s end), picked up elements of the Christian Hallowtide (All Saint’s Day and All Soul’s Day), arrived in North America as an Irish and Scottish festival, then evolved into an unofficial but large-scale holiday by the early 20th century.

Music Training Has Biological Impact on Aging Process

The NCFR Video on this page has the quote
National Children’s Folksong Repository
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/NCFR/NCFR.html
Einstein’s thoughts on Musi
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Music/musicsmart.html
Creativity and Dreams
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/IEC/creativity-dream.html
Music Smarts!
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Music/musicsmart2.html
 
Music Training Has Biological Impact on Aging Process
Aging-related hearing loss is not set in stone, study finds
January 30, 2012 | by Wendy Leopold
EVANSTON — Age-related delays in neural timing are not inevitable and can be avoided or offset with musical training, according to a new study from Northwestern University. The study is the first to provide biological evidence that lifelong musical experience has an impact on the aging process.
Measuring the automatic brain responses of younger and older musicians and non-musicians to speech sounds, researchers in the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory discovered that older musicians had a distinct neural timing advantage.
“The older musicians not only outperformed their older non-musician counterparts, they encoded the sound stimuli as quickly and accurately as the younger non-musicians,” said Northwestern neuroscientist Nina Kraus. “This reinforces the idea that how we actively experience sound over the course of our lives has a profound effect on how our nervous system functions.”
Kraus, professor of communication sciences in the School of Communication and professor of neurobiology and physiology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, is co-author of “Musical experience offsets age-related delays in neural timing” published online in the journal “Neurobiology of Aging.”
“These are very interesting and important findings,” said Don Caspary, a nationally known researcher on age-related hearing loss at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. “They support the idea that the brain can be trained to overcome, in part, some age-related hearing loss.”
“The new Northwestern data, with recent animal data from Michael Merzenich and his colleagues at University of California, San Francisco, strongly suggest that intensive training even late in life could improve speech processing in older adults and, as a result, improve their ability to communicate in complex, noisy acoustic environments,” Caspary added.
Previous studies from Kraus’ Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory suggest that musical training also offset losses in memory and difficulties hearing speech in noise — two common complaints of older adults. The lab has been extensively studying the effects of musical experience on brain plasticity across the life span in normal and clinical populations, and in educational settings.
However, Kraus warns that the current study’s findings were not pervasive and do not demonstrate that musician’s have a neural timing advantage in every neural response to sound. “Instead, this study showed that musical experience selectively affected the timing of sound elements that are important in distinguishing one consonant from another.”
The automatic neural responses to speech sounds delivered to 87 normal-hearing, native English-speaking adults were measured as they watched a captioned video. “Musician” participants began musical training before age 9 and engaged consistently in musical activities through their lives, while “non-musicians” had three years or less of musical training.
Kraus, who co-authored the study with Northwestern researchers Alexandra Parbery-Clark, Samira Anderson and Emily Hittner, is available at nkraus@northwestern.edu or at (847) 491-3181. For more about the work of Kraus’ Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory on music perception and learning-associated brain plasticity, visit http://www.soc.northwestern.edu/brainvolts/.
http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2012/01/kraus-neural-timing.html
 

Related Stories


Circadas 17 year Journey arrives June 2013!

The Circadas are Comming at the end of May / June

Here comes Swarmageddon! The name is a direct derivation of the Latin cicada, meaning “tree cricket” The 17-year cicadas are found mainly in the northern, eastern, and western part of their range.
Cicadas, large, ugly, noisy bugs that can be devastating to vegetation but are harmless to people. Cicadas are benign to humans under normal circumstances and do not bite or sting in a true sense, but may mistake a person’s arm or other part of their body for a tree or plant limb and attempt to feed,
In January 1912, when New York’s state entomologist issued a report on the appearance of the insects in 1911, he was nearly breathless: “The large size of the insects, their immense numbers, the accompanying roar, the spectacular injury and unique life history, all combine to excite popular interest in the periodical visitations of this remarkable species.”
 

Ciracadas are good to eat.

Experts say that the best way to eat cicadas is to collect them in the middle of the night as they emerge from their burrows and before their skins harden. When they are in this condition—like soft-shell crabs—they can be boiled for about a minute. It is said they taste like asparagus or clam-flavored potato.
Mature cicadas should be boiled while still alive to kill any bacteria, and already-dead cicadas should never be harvested because they could be decomposing. Also, anyone with allergies to shellfish, which belong to the same family as cicadas, should avoid the bugs altogether.
– Cicadas sautéed in butter and garlic.
– Dipped in chocolate for a sweet, crunchy snack.
Ice cream laced with cicadas is not illegal to serve to the public are boiled bugs were covered with brown sugar and milk chocolate, then mixed in with an ice cream base of brown sugar and butter

Facts: Only the males sing.
Circada Roar
Cicada song
Cicadas in Greece
A single Cicada calling
The females are lured to the sound and fly nearer. A female responds to a male with a flick of her wings. The two gradually draw close to one another until they meet for mating.
• In China male cicadas are kept in cages in people’s homes so that the homeowners can enjoy the cicadas’ songs.
Musician and philosopher David Rothenberg is playing in a musical celebration 17 years in the making: the emergence of the cicadas. This summer, these noisy insects will come out in droves to molt and mate—filling the air with their characteristic buzzing. Explore the extraordinary mating rituals of these and other six-legged creatures to find out what their songs are saying, why they’re saying it, and how this knowledge is impacting our understanding of communication, behavior, and the ecosystem in Cicada Serenades: Music, Mating, and Meaning.
Most authors are agreed that the cicada was used by the Chinese as a symbol of rebirth, although a few suggest additional (17, 18) or alternative meanings (3) such as “harvest time,” “autumn,” “fertility and abundance,” or “life giving principle.”
The depictions of cicadas on the early bronzes vary from quite realistic (6) to highly stylized (13, 16, 17, 22, 24) and almost leaflike (16). In some cases they are associated with another beast. Munsterberg (17) says that “in several instances the tiger is shown spitting out a cicada.” Later he says that “the t’ao t’ieh daemon is also frequently shown with a cicada on his outstretched tongue.” Bachhofer (2) refers to dragons in moderate relief, “their bodies… covered with a diminutive cicada pattern.” Speaking of bronze vessels he states that the heads of serpents are identical with the heads of cicadas. Certainly the “snake-head” with a “tongue” that rattles, terminating handle of a ritual bronze sword shown on page 39 in Fontein and Wu (13), looks more like a cicada than a snake head. Could the rattle have even been an imitation of a cicada’s call? Even a rattlesnake does not rattle with its head, and in this case there is apparently no snake body, only the “head.” The rattle mechanism looks like a wing, not a snake’s tongue.
In addition to bronzes, cicadas have been found decorating Shang white pottery ware (2). Laufer (16) reproduces (from ancient manuscripts) cicadas on ceremonial jade axes, jade cups, and a jade buckle which also includes a mantis.
These “sacred animal symbols” (17), cicadas, were used during the Han period (202 B.C. – 220 A.D.) or earlier as jade carvings (9), variously called “funeral jades,” “amulets of death,” “tongue amulets,” or “Han y?,” meaning “placed in the mouth,” according to Burling and Hart (3), who note that the term does not mean “made in the Han dynasty,” as some students assume, but that the items so designated “may date from many centuries earlier or later.”