King of the Dudes, What is Battle of the Bros all duded up?

King of the Dudes

Other words such as dude also emerged in the Five Points, said Cassidy.

Dud in old Irish, appearing in the Irish-English dictionary by Father Patrick Dineen published in 1927, means “dolt, a numbskull, a rubbernecker; a mopish, shy, foolish-looking fellow”, he said. In the Five Points, says Cassidy, richer classes would come for the booze and the girls, and the working-class Irish used to look at them with their monocles and top hats and derogatorily called them “dud”.

1888 Evander Berry Wall a New York Socialite was dubbed
“King of the Dudes.”
New York American newspaper “Battle of the Dudes”. The New York Journal-American was a daily newspaper published in New York City from 1937 to 1966.
dude

This version of the word is still in occasional use in American slang, as in the phrase “all duded up” for getting dressed in fancy clothes.
He inherited $2 million before the age of 22.  He went bankrupt in 1899 and  declared that “New York had become fit only for businessmen” and left for Paris in 1912. He used bespoke shirtmaker Charvet, where Wall had his signature “spread eagle” collar shirts and cravats custom-made for himself and his dog. Wall always dined at the Ritz with his dog, whose collars and ties were made by Charvet in the same style and fabric as his master’s. When he died, he left only $12,608, having “squandered nearly every cent on pleasure.”

Learn about Irish American Vernacular English
How the Irish Invented Slang
Subtitle: The Secret Language of the Crossroads
by Professor Dan Cassidy

How the Irish Invented American Gambling Slang into Irish American Vernacular English.

What Does Boogie Mean?
The Linguist is taking notes. 1941 Ball of Fire – Billy Wilder, Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyk.

Slang is words that takes off his coat, spits on it’s hands and gets to work!

Giniker – Irish American Vernacular English: The Sunday Times Ireland July 9th 2006

IT SOUNDS like a load of bunkum, or in this case buanchumadh, but according to an American academic the Irish language has been a huge influence on American slang.

The Sanas (Irish Etymology) of Faro, Poker and the Secret Flash Words for the Brotherhood of American Gamblers. By DANIEL CASSIDY 5/13/06

Remember in 1859 Philadelphia is the 4th largest city in the WORLD.

“There’s A Sucker (Sách úr, fresh new “fat cat”) Born Every Minute.” See etymology of Bunk and Dude both are Irish.

The Sanas (Irish Etymology) of Faro, Poker and the Secret Flash Words for the Brotherhood of American Gamblers. By DANIEL CASSIDY 5/13/06

“Language is a virus from outer space.” – William S. Burroughs BEAT generation

Irish American Vernacular English words traced, found, and borrowed into Standard American English.

Karen Ellis Guest Lecturer
Honoring the work of Scholar Peter Tamony and The Sanas, the Etymology of Jazz and Dan Cassidy

Dudes: NYT News Desk 1942

dude

Well dressed in 1902 

The best-dressed American in Europe, the King of the Dudes. He was reported to possess 285 pairs of pants, 5,000 custom-tailored neckties. It was rumored that he changed his ties six times a day. His conduct was motivated by a great principle: find out what suits you and always wear it. Berry Wall usually wore capes and coats of horse-blanket plaid, high horse-collars cinched with lush Ascot cravats.

Donald Trump advisor/confidante Roger J Stone Jr with wife Nydia at the Inauguration. #Dandy #Style Roger Stone is primarily known as a political consultant, but he also serves as the men’s fashion correspondent for the Daily Caller. #1 DUDE The Dapper Don

Panicked Wall Street Bros Wonder: What Is Business-Casual??

Goldman Sachs bank execs Panicked Wall Street Bros Wonder: What Is Business-Casual???

Patter for Three-Card Monte – thanks to Whit Haydn School for Scoundrels

Who Killed Society by Cleveland Amory

DHS, FBI say election systems in all 50 states were targeted in 2016

DUDE Trump’s Justice Department OKs Trading with the Enemy
Trading with the Enemy Act  George Bush’s grandfather, the late US senator DUDE Prescott Bush, was a director and shareholder of companies that profited from their involvement with the financial backers of Nazi Germany. Files in the US National Archives shows Prescott Bush – how did we get here was a director  involved with…

Thorstein Veblen, the greatest American thinker you probably never heard of, predicted the rise of a Gilded Business Man and the demolition of democracy. The man who saw this coming a century ago

Louis the 14th thought “The State” was a person. HIM!

DUDE Trump’s money came from his grandfather another DUDE WHO owned a general store and whore house.

Donald Trump’s money originally came from his grandfather Friedrich Trump a German immigrant, who ran a whore house /restaurant – bar, in British Columbia.
Buried in a ghost town in Canada’s subarctic are the roots of the family fortune that paved Donald Trump’s path to prominence.

Guthrie reworked his signature Dust Bowl ballad “I Ain’t Got No Home” into a blistering broadside against his landlord: BEACH HAVEN AIN’T MY HOME (aka. “Old Man Trump”) Words by Woody Guthrie

Nov. 8 election that Eric had asked if American Hat Co. could make a custom hat for his father. Soon after, the manufacturer was at work getting measurements ready as well as the materials befitting the president of the United States.
“It morphed into now we’re making hats for Eric, for Don Jr. and for Mike Pence as well,” Mundee said.
Mundee said the Trump family requested a light-colored hat versus black, so the manufacturer went with a silverish tone. The material is a mixture of beaver belly fur and mink, making the hat soft as silk. The crown, or top of the hat, is done in a cattleman’s style. He said this specific style of hat is widely known as the finest in the cowboy market.
And it’s not just the material that American Hat Co. uses that puts their stamp on the product. It’s also the gold foil stamp on the inside band that also illustrates its quality, as well as the Keith Maddox mark of “KM” on the brim of the hat. The hat retails for about $2,800.

FIND A #JOB: Cybersecurity talent gaps exist across the country.

Resources for High School Students Interested in Cyber Security

Summer Camps are a great introduction to cyber security.
Online Courses are the next step to growing knowledge and experience, while at the same time learn more about a potential career path.

Hackathons are the playground for testing how far you’ve come.

Many internship programs available to exact academic paths/interest. Generally speaking, cyber security degree seeking students may pursue positions at the CIA in STEM, Clandestine, Analysis, or Enterprise and Support Roles.

Must apply senior year in high school. Rigorous application process includes polygraph, mental health evaluation, financial need, background checks, high academic marks, abstinence from drugs, and more. Successful applicants will be provided a salary as well as have tuition covered up to a certain price. Successful applicants will work at the CIA in summers and continue to work for the CIA after graduation.

Meet the Terabytches: Fergus students prep for cyber security competition
‘We’re like the biggest collective knowledge in a girls’ team,’ Emily Younghans says

MOST Inexpensive Colleges With the Highest Graduation Rate

NEED A #JOB: https://www.cyberseek.org/heatmap.html

TOP CYBERSECURITY JOB TITLES
  • Cyber Security Engineer
  • Cyber Security Analyst
  • Network Engineer / Architect
  • Cyber Security Manager / Administrator
  • Systems Engineer
  • Software Developer / Engineer
  • Systems Administrator
  • Vulnerability Analyst / Penetration Tester
  • Cyber Security Consultant

11 federal agencies help start Cybersecurity Talent Initiative

11 federal agencies help start Cybersecurity Talent Initiative

How the FBI Conceals Its Payments to Confidential Sources

https://theintercept.com/2017/01/31/how-the-fbi-conceals-its-payments-to-confidential-sources/

A classified policy guide creates opportunities for agents to disguise payments as reimbursements or offer informants a cut of seized assets.

For the first time, we can now point to an internal government document that provides the framework for how informants are paid.

The FBI’s Confidential Human Source Policy Guide, a nearly 200-page manual classified secret and obtained by The Intercept, describes how payments to FBI informants are accounted for and authorized and how these payments can quickly become serious money.

The picture that emerges is of an approach that borrows some of the sophistication of modern banking. The bureau has devised a variety of ways to pay informants, including directly, before or after trial; via reimbursements; and through a cut of asset forfeitures.

A special agent-in-charge has the authority to pay each of his office’s informants up to $100,000 per fiscal year. However, informants may earn substantially more as long as each additional $100,000 is approved by successively higher levels within the bureau. With deputy director approval, according to the policy guide, an informant may earn more than $500,000 per year.

In addition to compensation, an informant may be eligible for 25 percent of the net value of any property forfeited as a result of the investigation, up to $500,000 per asset, according to the guide. This can be a particularly lucrative benefit for drug informants, whose cases sometimes result in the forfeiture of planes, boats, cars, and real estate.

<snip>

The Man Who Saw Trump Coming a Century Ago

Thorstein Veblen, the greatest American thinker you probably never heard of, predicted the rise of a Gilded Business Man and the demolition of democracy.

The Man Who Saw Trump Coming a Century Ago

Veblen got his initial job, teaching political economy at a salary of $520 a year, in 1890 when the University of Chicago first opened its doors. Back in the days before SATs and admissions scandals, that school was founded and funded by John D. Rockefeller, the classic robber baron of Standard Oil. (Think of him as the Mark Zuckerberg of his day.)

from the beginning, Thorstein Veblen was there, prepared to focus his mind on Rockefeller and his cronies, the cream of the upper class and the most ruthless profiteers behind that Gilded Age. He was already asking questions that deserve to be raised again in the 1% world of 2019. How had such a conspicuous lordly class developed in America? What purpose did it serve? What did the members of the leisure class actually do with their time and money? And why did so many of the ruthlessly over-worked, under-paid lower classes tolerate such a peculiar, lopsided social arrangement in which they were so clearly the losers?

Why Poverty Is Like a Disease By Christian H. Cooper April 20, 2017

This science challenges us to re-evaluate a cornerstone of American mythology, and of our social policies for the poor: the bootstrap.

The story of the self-made, inspirational individual transcending his or her circumstances by sweat and hard work. A pillar of the framework of meritocracy, where rewards are supposedly justly distributed to those who deserve them most.
What kind of a bootstrap or merit-based game can we be left with if poverty cripples the contestants? Especially if it has intergenerational effects? The uglier converse of the bootstrap hypothesis—that those who fail to transcend their circumstances deserve them—makes even less sense in the face of the grim biology of poverty. When the firing gun goes off, the poor are well behind the start line. Despite my success, I certainly was.

Why Poverty Is Like a Disease

Christian H. Cooper April 20, 2017

http://nautil.us/issue/47/consciousness/why-poverty-is-like-a-disease

Emerging science is putting the lie to American meritocracy.

On paper alone you would never guess that I grew up poor and hungry.

My most recent annual salary was over $700,000. I am a Truman National Security Fellow and a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations. My publisher has just released my latest book series on quantitative finance in worldwide distribution.

None of it feels like enough though. I feel as though I am wired for a permanent state of flight or fight, waiting for the other shoe to drop, or the metaphorical week when I don’t eat. I’ve chosen not to have children, partly because—despite any success—I still don’t feel I have a safety net. I have a huge minimum checking account balance in mind before I would ever consider having children. If you knew me personally, you might get glimpses of stress, self-doubt, anxiety, and depression. And you might hear about Tennessee.

Meet anyone from Tennessee and they will never say they are from “just” Tennessee. They’ll add a prefix: East, West, or Middle. My early life was in East Tennessee, in an Appalachian town called Rockwood. I was the eldest of four children with a household income that couldn’t support one. Every Pentecostal church in the surrounding hillbilly heroin country smelled the same: a sweaty mix of cheap cleaner and even cheaper anointing oil, with just a hint of forsaken hope. One of those forsaken churches was effectively my childhood home, and my school.

Class was a single room of 20 people running from kindergarten through twelfth grade, part of an unaccredited school practicing what’s called

Accelerated Christian Education. We were given booklets to read to ourselves, by ourselves. We scored our own homework. There were no lectures, and I did not have a teacher. Once in a while the preacher’s wife would hand out a test. We weren’t allowed to do anything. There were no movies, and no music. Years would pass with no distinguishing features, no events. There was barely any socializing.

On top of it all, I spent a lot of my time pondering basic questions. Where will my next meal come from? Will I have electricity tomorrow? I became intimately acquainted with the embarrassment of my mom trying to hide our food stamps at the grocery store checkout. I remember panic setting in as early as age 8, at the prospect of a perpetual uncertainty about everything in life, from food to clothes to education. I knew that the life I was living couldn’t be normal. Something was wrong with the tiny microcosm I was born into. I just wasn’t sure what it was.

As an adult I thought I’d figured that out. I’d always thought my upbringing had made me wary and cautious, in a “lessons learned” kind of way. Over the past decades, though, that narrative has evolved. We’ve learned that the stresses associated with poverty have the potential to change our biology in ways we hadn’t imagined. It can reduce the surface area of your brain, shorten your telomeres and lifespan, increase your chances of obesity, and make you more likely to take outsized risks.

Now, new evidence is emerging suggesting the changes can go even deeper—to how our bodies assemble themselves, shifting the proportions of types of cells that they are made from, and maybe even how our genetic code is expressed, playing with it like a Rubik’s cube thrown into a running washing machine. If this science holds up, it means that poverty is more than just a socioeconomic condition. It is a collection of related symptoms that are preventable, treatable—and even inheritable. In other words, the effects of poverty begin to look very much like the symptoms of a disease.

That word—disease—carries a stigma with it. By using it here, I don’t mean that the poor are (that I am) inferior or compromised. I mean that the poor are afflicted, and told by the rest of the world that their condition is a necessary, temporary, and even positive part of modern capitalism. We tell the poor that they have the chance to escape if they just work hard enough; that we are all equally invested in a system that doles out rewards and punishments in equal measure. We point at the rare rags-to-riches stories like my own, which seem to play into the standard meritocracy template.

But merit has little to do with how I got out.

[snip]

Who you are as a person is not just defined by your DNA, but by which parts of it your epigenome permits to be expressed.

Autocracy loves confusion but what about 1st ammendment rights?

By Cory Doctorow
Nov 27 2018
<https://boingboing.net/2018/11/27/autocracy-loves-confusion.html>

The same disinformation campaigns that epitomize the divisions in US society — beliefs in voter fraud, vaccine conspiracies, and racist conspiracies about migrants, George Soros and Black Lives Matter, to name a few — are a source of strength for autocracies like Russia, where the lack of a consensus on which groups and views are real and which are manufactured by the state strengthens the hand of Putin and his clutch of oligarchs.

In a new Harvard Berkman Center paper, Common -Knowledge Attacks on Democracy, political scientist Henry Farrell (previously and security expert Bruce Schneier (previously) team up to explore this subject by using information security techniques, and come to a very plausible-seeming explanation and a set of policy recommendations to address the issue.

Farrell and Schneier start by exploring the failures of both national security and information security paradigms to come to grips with the issue: Cold War-style national security is oriented around Cold War ideas like “offense–defense balance, conventional deterrence theory, and deterrence by denial,” none of which are very useful for thinking about disinformation attacks; meanwhile, information security limits itself to thinking about “servers and individual networks” and not “the consequences of attacks for the broader fabric of democratic societies.”

Despite these limits, the authors say that there is a way to use the tools of information security to unpick these kinds of “information attacks” on democracies: treat “the entire polity as an information system with associated attack surfaces and threat models” — that is, to think about the democracy itself as the thing to be defended, rather than networks or computers.

From there, they revisit the different disinformation styles of various autocracies and autocratic movements, particularly the Russian style of sowing doubt about what truth is and where it can be found (infamously, Russia’s leading political strategist admits that he secretly funds some opposition groups, but won’t say which ones, leaving everyone to wonder whether a given group is genuine or manufactured — there’s some excellent scholarship contrasting this with the style used by the Chinese state and also with techniques used by authoritarian insurgents inside of democracies, like Milo Yiannopoulos).

In the paper’s framework, the stability of autocrats’ power requires that the public not know how other people feel — for there to be constant confusion about which institutions, groups and views are genuine and which ones are conspiracies, frauds, or power-grabs. Once members of the public discover how many of their neighbors agree that the ruling autocracy is garbage, they are emboldened to rise up against it. Tunisia’s dictatorship was stable so long as the law banning dissent could be enforced, but the lack of enforcement on Facebook allowed Tunisians to gain insight into their neighbors’ discontent, leading to the collapse of the regime.

By contrast, democracies rely on good knowledge about the views of other people, most notably embodied by things like free and fair elections, where citizens get a sense of their neighbors’ views, and are thus motivated to find solutions that they know will be widely viewed as legitimate and will therefore be sustainable.

So when information attacks against democracies sow doubt about the genuineness of movements and views — when Soros is accused of funding left-wing movements, when Koch Industries’ name is all over the funding sources of right-wing think-tanks, when politicians depend on big money, and when Facebook ads and its engagement algorithm pushes people to hoaxes and conspiracies — it weakens democracy in exactly the same way that it strengthens autocracy. Without a sense of which political views are genuine and which are disinformation, all debate degenerates into people calling each other shills or bots, and never arriving at compromises with the stamp of broad legitimacy.

It’s not a coincidence that the right’s political playbook is so intertwined with this kind of disinformation and weakening of democracy.

A widely held belief on the political right is that the most important “freedom” is private property rights, and since rich people are always outnumbered by poor people, subscribers to this ideology hold that “freedom is incompatible with democracy,” because in a fair vote, the majority 99% will vote to redistribute the fortunes of the minority 1%. In this conception, the rich are the only “oppressed minority” who can’t be defended by democracy.

This gives rise to the right’s belief in natural hierarchies, which are sorted out by markets, with the best people rising to the top (Boris Johnson: “As many as 16 per cent of our species have an IQ below 85, while about 2 per cent have an IQ above 130. The harder you shake the pack, the easier it will be for some cornflakes to get to the top.”).

The right’s position, fundamentally, is that the “best” people should boss everyone else around for their own good:

kings should boss around commoners (monarchists); slavers should boss around enslaved people (white nationalists); husbands should boss around wives and kids (Dominionists); America should boss around the world (imperialists); and rich people should boss around workers (capitalists).

[snip]

How fighting political disinformation could collide with the First Amendment

By Deanna Paul <behind paywall>
https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/03/30/how-fighting-political-disinformation-could-collide-with-first-amendment/

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley was served with a subpoena today as he left the CPAC stage

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley was served with a subpoena today as he left the CPAC stage, the Kansas City Star reports.

The first standing ovation at CPAC comes for…Ollie at the North American Conservative Union’s CPAC conference

How can we not forget Crazy Ollie the arms dealing traitor.

Individual 1 Trump Organization, Trump Tower Moscow Project

Individual 1 Trump Organization and his Family involved with the Trump Tower Moscow Project

Trump Knew and directed the negotiation during the presidential campaign.

The American population needs to know what happened.

Laurence Tribe: President Donald Trump Can Be Indicted For Federal Crimes

The get out of jail free card.

If no indictment then Trump can be pardoned by Pence and get to keep all the profits!!!

Harvard’s Laurence Tribe: Impeach Donald Trump Now
Constitutional law professor Laurence Tribe explains why it is critically important to put the impeachment process in motion now, before it is too late.

President Donald Trump, Ivanka Deny Special Treatment For Jared Kushner

White House announces Kushner met with Saudi crown prince as Cohen testifies

FEBRUARY 27, 2019
Donald Trump’s senior adviser Jared Kushner met with Saudi Arabia’s crown prince Tuesday in their first face-to-face encounter since the October 2018 murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who sources have told CNN the CIA assesses with high confidence ordered Khashoggi’s murder, met Kushner along with his father King Salman
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/27/world/middleeast/kushner-Mohammed-bin-Salman.html

House panel demands Kushner clearance details from White House
A Democratic-led congressional panel on Friday demanded that the White House comply with requests for documents and witnesses for a probe into alleged security clearance abuses involving President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and others.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-kushner/house-panel-demands-kushner-clearance-details-from-white-house-idUSKCN1QI5CU

I’ll take venal hypocrites for $1,000 please Alex.

[ECP] NetHappenings: email remains vulnerable, responsible for 94 percent of all attacks

Today’s Read

On what grounds can the FBI investigate the President
https://www.lawfareblog.com/what-grounds-can-fbi-investigate-president-counterintelligence-threat

A transnational crime syndicate backed by Russian oligarchs is pushing the UK off a cliff. You cannot, like Jeremy Corbyn, stand up against corruption at home but not stand up against it abroad.”
https://www.patreon.com/posts/24843802

Elections Commission Chief Uses the “Nuclear Option” to Rescue the Agency From Gridlock
The agency’s chair says she won’t allow its lawyers to defend it when it’s sued.
https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2019/02/elections-commission-chief-uses-the-nuclear-option-to-rescue-the-agency-from-gridlock/

Zuckerberg didn’t “sell” data he sold “access” !!!

STEM NASA Education

Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.
Seeing Your Students at NASA: Engineering for Mars — Part 1
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-10
Event Date: Sept. 15, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
In Part 1 of this series, educators will review two classroom activities in which students work in engineering design teams to test various components of a Mars exploration vehicle. This ready-to-go facilitation guide, Gaining Traction, is aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards and includes a pre-assessment, handouts, rubrics and a post-assessment. In the first two activities of the project, students build batteries and test wheel friction while focusing on the subject areas of engineering, motion and interaction. Register online to participate.https://www.etouches.com/198527
Seeing Your Students at NASA: STEM Careers Exploration Webquest
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 19, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Consider using a webquest in your classroom to engage students in guided inquiry. Students will begin to identify STEM career opportunities that they are interested in while clicking on video links about scientists and engineers who work with environmental issues and problems. The webquest and resources may be used by students working independently or for the whole class to stimulate discussion and collaboration.
Link to the webquest:
https://pmm.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov/education/interactive/stem-careers-exploration
Register online to participate:
https://www.etouches.com/199703
Seeing Your Students at NASA: Rocks From Space and Other Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-8
Event Date: Sept. 20, 2016, at 5 p.m. EDT
Astromaterials scientists at NASA study rocks and “soil” samples from other planetary bodies. Learn how students can use GLOBE materials to study Earth rocks and soils; find out about the Lunar and Meteorite Certification program for educators; and take a tour of the various missions and research NASA has conducted and continues to conduct in our solar system and beyond. Register online to participate.https://www.etouches.com/198916
Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 1 — Curriculum Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 21, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Learn how to help students study exoplanetary systems through hands-on activities, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multiuser virtual world simulations. The vMAX Curriculum (Part 1) webinar gives an overview of exoplanetary system resources that build upon the use of NASA data. These resources are organized for a one-week experience for middle school students but are flexible enough for any formal or informal audience and time period. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196414
Virtual Missions and Exoplanets (vMAX): Part 2 — Technical Overview
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Sept. 22, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Learn how to help students study exoplanetary systems through hands-on activities, scenario-based problem solving, and 3-D multiuser virtual world simulations. To prepare teachers to use the vMAX virtual world with students, the vMAX Technical (Part 2) webinar addresses technical requirements to download, install and navigate the virtual world as an avatar. It is suggested that educators participate in BOTH webinars for a complete understanding of how to implement these resources. Register online to participate.https://www.etouches.com/196416
For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visithttp://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.
Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan atstephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.



NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Seeks Educators and Students for Climate Change Research Initiative

The NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative is an opportunity for high school educators and graduate students to work directly with NASA scientists in a NASA research project associated with the science related to climate change.
High school STEM educators participating in this yearlong opportunity will become associate researchers at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and STEM education experts. They will integrate NASA education resources and content into their classrooms while improving STEM education within their communities.
For graduate students, this yearlong opportunity will not conflict with the student’s course work and class schedule during the fall and spring. The internship is considered to be a part-time position that supports the graduate student’s major area of study.
All applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside within a 50-mile radius of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, located in New York City.
Applications are due Sept. 16, 2016.
For more information, visithttp://www.giss.nasa.gov/edu/ccri/.
Please direct inquiries about the NASA GISS Climate Change Research Initiative to Matthew Pearce at matthew.d.pearce@nasa.gov.



Educator Workshop — Comets Close Up

The Rosetta spacecraft is on a 10-year mission to study the comet “67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko” (C-G) and answer questions about comets. Join lead scientists for the Rosetta mission in an educational workshop that explores hands-on activities and resources for engaging students in the science of comets and small bodies.
In this workshop, Rosetta project scientist Bonnie Buratti and project manager Art Chmielewski will share some of the basic physics of comets and discuss how the Rosetta mission was able to land on one for the first time. Hear about the mission’s latest discoveries, see incredible up-close images of the comet, and get the inside scoop on a second landing on the comet scheduled for Sept. 30, 2016.

The target audience for the workshop is formal and informal educators of grades 6-12, but it is open to all educators.
The event will take place Sept. 24, 2016, from8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. PDT at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
For more information, directions to the workshop location, and instructions for reserving a spot, visithttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2016/9/24/educator-workshop-comets-close-up.
To learn more about the Rosetta mission, visithttp://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov/.
Please direct questions about this workshop to Andrea Angrum at 818-354-6775.



Join STEM@NASA Goddard in Celebrating International Observe the Moon Night!

Are you ready to look at the moon in an entirely new way? Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center on Sept. 28, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT for STEM@NASA Goddard: International Observe the Moon Night. During this 30-minute event, Andrea Jones, education specialist for Planetary Science Institute at NASA Goddard, will share how International Observe the Moon Night encourages appreciation and understanding of our moon and its connection to NASA planetary science and exploration.
The program will stream live on NASA Goddard’s Ustream channel, and participants will be able to submit questions by email and Twitter.
For more information, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.



REGISTRATION OPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016
The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2016 will take place this fall.
The tournament will offer U.S. high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space. Zero Robotics challenges high school student teams to write their own algorithms to fly the Synchronized, Position, Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The competition starts online where, guided by mentors, teams compete to solve an annual challenge. Students can create, edit, share, save, simulate and submit code from a web browser. After several phases of virtual competition, finalists will be selected to compete virtually in a live championship aboard the International Space Station.
Registration closes on Sept. 28, 2016.
For more information about the tournament and to register your team to participate, visithttp://zerorobotics.mit.edu/.
The competition began with a live webcast kickoff from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Sept. 10, 2016. Visit the Zero Robotics website to watch an archived video of the kickoff event.
Please email any questions about this opportunity to zerorobotics@mit.edu.



Celebrate Solar Week — Fall 2016

Solar Week, October 17-21, provides a weeklong series of web-based activities with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. Young people ages 10-14 can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar eclipses, solar energy and solar storms through a series of cool facts, activities and games.
Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. After doing the activities, participants can interact on the bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research. Solar Week is great for learning about our nearest star, the sun.
To learn more and to register to participate, visithttp://www.solarweek.org.
Questions about Solar Week may be emailed tosolarweek@solarweek.org.



Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.
Seven Minutes of Terror: The Engineering Behind Landing on Other Planets
Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Rocket thrusters, giant airbags and a sky crane: These are just a few ways we have landed on other planets. Join the webcast to explore the engineering behind these different techniques and what is in store for future missions.
Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science on the Station
Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
Do you like being poked, prodded and analyzed? If you said yes, then you may have a future as an astronaut. Astronauts on the International Space Station don’t just conduct scientific experiments — they are part of an experiment themselves. Learning about the human factors of spaceflight is an important element to a future trip to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the effects of space on the humans who travel there.
The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer
Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers’ bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.
“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.
For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visithttps://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.
Questions about this series should be directed toSTEMin30@si.edu.