King of the Dudes, What is Battle of the Bros all duded up?

King of the Dudes

Other words such as dude also emerged in the Five Points, said Cassidy.

Dud in old Irish, appearing in the Irish-English dictionary by Father Patrick Dineen published in 1927, means “dolt, a numbskull, a rubbernecker; a mopish, shy, foolish-looking fellow”, he said. In the Five Points, says Cassidy, richer classes would come for the booze and the girls, and the working-class Irish used to look at them with their monocles and top hats and derogatorily called them “dud”.

1888 Evander Berry Wall a New York Socialite was dubbed
“King of the Dudes.”
New York American newspaper “Battle of the Dudes”. The New York Journal-American was a daily newspaper published in New York City from 1937 to 1966.
dude

This version of the word is still in occasional use in American slang, as in the phrase “all duded up” for getting dressed in fancy clothes.
He inherited $2 million before the age of 22.  He went bankrupt in 1899 and  declared that “New York had become fit only for businessmen” and left for Paris in 1912. He used bespoke shirtmaker Charvet, where Wall had his signature “spread eagle” collar shirts and cravats custom-made for himself and his dog. Wall always dined at the Ritz with his dog, whose collars and ties were made by Charvet in the same style and fabric as his master’s. When he died, he left only $12,608, having “squandered nearly every cent on pleasure.”

Learn about Irish American Vernacular English
How the Irish Invented Slang
Subtitle: The Secret Language of the Crossroads
by Professor Dan Cassidy

How the Irish Invented American Gambling Slang into Irish American Vernacular English.

What Does Boogie Mean?
The Linguist is taking notes. 1941 Ball of Fire – Billy Wilder, Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyk.

Slang is words that takes off his coat, spits on it’s hands and gets to work!

Giniker – Irish American Vernacular English: The Sunday Times Ireland July 9th 2006

IT SOUNDS like a load of bunkum, or in this case buanchumadh, but according to an American academic the Irish language has been a huge influence on American slang.

The Sanas (Irish Etymology) of Faro, Poker and the Secret Flash Words for the Brotherhood of American Gamblers. By DANIEL CASSIDY 5/13/06

Remember in 1859 Philadelphia is the 4th largest city in the WORLD.

“There’s A Sucker (Sách úr, fresh new “fat cat”) Born Every Minute.” See etymology of Bunk and Dude both are Irish.

The Sanas (Irish Etymology) of Faro, Poker and the Secret Flash Words for the Brotherhood of American Gamblers. By DANIEL CASSIDY 5/13/06

“Language is a virus from outer space.” – William S. Burroughs BEAT generation

Irish American Vernacular English words traced, found, and borrowed into Standard American English.

Karen Ellis Guest Lecturer
Honoring the work of Scholar Peter Tamony and The Sanas, the Etymology of Jazz and Dan Cassidy

Dudes: NYT News Desk 1942

dude

Well dressed in 1902 

The best-dressed American in Europe, the King of the Dudes. He was reported to possess 285 pairs of pants, 5,000 custom-tailored neckties. It was rumored that he changed his ties six times a day. His conduct was motivated by a great principle: find out what suits you and always wear it. Berry Wall usually wore capes and coats of horse-blanket plaid, high horse-collars cinched with lush Ascot cravats.

Donald Trump advisor/confidante Roger J Stone Jr with wife Nydia at the Inauguration. #Dandy #Style Roger Stone is primarily known as a political consultant, but he also serves as the men’s fashion correspondent for the Daily Caller. #1 DUDE The Dapper Don

Panicked Wall Street Bros Wonder: What Is Business-Casual??

Goldman Sachs bank execs Panicked Wall Street Bros Wonder: What Is Business-Casual???

Patter for Three-Card Monte – thanks to Whit Haydn School for Scoundrels

Who Killed Society by Cleveland Amory

DHS, FBI say election systems in all 50 states were targeted in 2016

DUDE Trump’s Justice Department OKs Trading with the Enemy
Trading with the Enemy Act  George Bush’s grandfather, the late US senator DUDE Prescott Bush, was a director and shareholder of companies that profited from their involvement with the financial backers of Nazi Germany. Files in the US National Archives shows Prescott Bush – how did we get here was a director  involved with…

Thorstein Veblen, the greatest American thinker you probably never heard of, predicted the rise of a Gilded Business Man and the demolition of democracy. The man who saw this coming a century ago

Louis the 14th thought “The State” was a person. HIM!

DUDE Trump’s money came from his grandfather another DUDE WHO owned a general store and whore house.

Donald Trump’s money originally came from his grandfather Friedrich Trump a German immigrant, who ran a whore house /restaurant – bar, in British Columbia.
Buried in a ghost town in Canada’s subarctic are the roots of the family fortune that paved Donald Trump’s path to prominence.

Guthrie reworked his signature Dust Bowl ballad “I Ain’t Got No Home” into a blistering broadside against his landlord: BEACH HAVEN AIN’T MY HOME (aka. “Old Man Trump”) Words by Woody Guthrie

Nov. 8 election that Eric had asked if American Hat Co. could make a custom hat for his father. Soon after, the manufacturer was at work getting measurements ready as well as the materials befitting the president of the United States.
“It morphed into now we’re making hats for Eric, for Don Jr. and for Mike Pence as well,” Mundee said.
Mundee said the Trump family requested a light-colored hat versus black, so the manufacturer went with a silverish tone. The material is a mixture of beaver belly fur and mink, making the hat soft as silk. The crown, or top of the hat, is done in a cattleman’s style. He said this specific style of hat is widely known as the finest in the cowboy market.
And it’s not just the material that American Hat Co. uses that puts their stamp on the product. It’s also the gold foil stamp on the inside band that also illustrates its quality, as well as the Keith Maddox mark of “KM” on the brim of the hat. The hat retails for about $2,800.

Girls change the world and can do anything

Educational CyberPlayGround: Websites for Girls and Young Women who want to be involved with Technology
WEBSITES FOR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN
How to help girls get into technology.
Real women engineers and other role models for girls.
Changing Girls’ Attitudes About Computers

“Don’t worry your pretty little head over it.”
Special Edition
Computer Wonder Women
National Women’s History Month
GIRLS WHO CODE: GIRLS CAN DO ANYTHING – GIRLS CAN CHANGE THE WORD
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr6b4nwo-5k

[CreoleTalk] Tenth Creolistics Workshop: Call for Papers

Call for papers
Tenth Creolistics Workshop: “Innovations” – with special attention to parallels between creole and sign language creation
Aarhus University, Denmark, 8-10 April 2015
http://www.creolisticsX.dk
Background of the Creolistics Workshop
The Creolistics Workshop, which has previously been held in London (UK), Amsterdam (NL), Giessen (D) and Aarhus (DK), has a long tradition for being a forum of exchange and inspiration in the creolistics community. For the tenth edition, the main focus will be on innovations, primarily in creoles and sign languages, but also in other types of languages where contact has played an important role.
Creole studies have traditionally focused on continuation and universals, discussing for instance the contributions of the lexifiers and substrates. In past decades, an important body of literature in creolistics has been produced with the goal of weighing the influences from the various contributing languages to creole formation. However, much less attention has been given to innovations, in particular lexical, semantic, syntactic and typological aspects that cannot easily be attributed to the known input languages.
Therefore, the aim of this workshop will be to shift the focus from a historical approach to creoles to a more cognitively-oriented framework whose primary goal will be to explain why certain strategies and structures are innovated and selected in the creation of new language varieties, while others are not.
As sign languages have been argued to show social and structural commonalities with creoles, special attention is given to Deaf Sign Languages.
 
Parallels between creole and sign language creation
The idea that sign languages can be considered creole languages is based on a variety of factors, and is often linked to the particular sociohistorical circumstances under which they emerged and evolved. Especially since the documentation of the genesis of Nicaraguan Sign Language (NSL), where researchers pointed out the sudden development of the language going through a process reminiscent of an initial pidgin stage with subsequent creolization, sign language students have looked at creole studies for inspiration. With few exceptions, this inspiration was more or less unidirectional. The time now seems ripe to cross-fertilize creole studies with research on Sign Languages.
There are several areas of similarity between creoles and sign languages: both are created and innovated from the bottom up, that is, the first generation of (new) sign language users modify, create and unify word signs and structures, just as may have happened in the genesis of creole languages. 90% of deaf children are born in hearing families, which means that the children will be better signers than their parents – just like, at some point in history, children creole speakers were.
There are also structural similarities between signed and spoken languages, such as aspect-dominance, preverbal marking of tense-mood-aspect, the marking of existentials with a verb meaning possession and the use of a sentence-final completive marker.
Furthermore, there are sociolinguistic similarities in that both types of languages are minority languages with low prestige, often lacking recognition and whose speakers and signers themselves belong to stigmatized communities.
Finally, both creole languages and sign languages have been diffused between areas, even between continents, for instance American Sign Language has its roots in French Sign Language rather than being the result of a local creation. Similarly, West African Pidgin English and Caribbean English creoles are historically connected, and several other pidgins/creoles are known to have spawned several daughter languages (e.g. the different Melanesian Pidgin Englishes).
One goal of Creolistics X is to bring together the field of creole studies together with that of sign linguistics so as to establish possible connections between the two types of languages, centering around the theme of innovations. Specifically, the development from pidgin to creole as compared to that from home-signs to full-fledged sign language offers an interesting and potentially fruitful research venue, with possible implications for, among others, general theoretical linguistics and evolutionary linguistics.
 
Call for papers
For this workshop, we would like to invite contributions from scholars working on creoles and sign languages from a diachronic or synchronic perspective. We welcome especially papers that deal with outcomes of contact situations where innovative expansions of the grammatical system can be observed, compared to earlier stages or to the contributing languages. We define innovations here broadly so as to encompass any distinction that is found neither in the lexifier, nor in the substrate languages.
Particularly welcome are contributions which touch upon the commonalities between sign languages and creoles, so that possible underlying cognitive mechanisms common to both language types, regardless of the modality they use, can be identified. Other topics of potential interest include, but are not limited to, how innovations spread and diffuse within a community (from ontogeny to phylogeny), or studies that investigate possible links between creole language and sign language genesis.
In the traditional spirit of openness of preceding Creolistics Workshops, other topics in the area of pidgin and creole languages will also be welcome.
 
Abstracts
The length of abstracts should not exceed 500 words. Please send your anonymized abstract to creolisticsX@gmail.com – remember to provide the name(s) of the author(s) and affiliation in the mail itself, not on the abstract. The deadline for submitting your abstract is on October 1, 2014. Notification of acceptance can be expected around November 1, 2014.
 
Homepage
http://www.creolisticsX.dk
On the homepage, you will find pratical information in connection with the event, as well as a bibliography of studies linking sign languages and creoles.
 
Sign language interpretation will be available for presenters at the conference.
Local organization
Julie Bakken Jepsen
Peter Bakker
Finn Borchsenius
Aymeric Daval-Markussen
Carsten Levisen
Eeva Sippola
**************************************************
CreoleTALK Mailing List
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Linguistics/

[CreoleTalk] SARGASSO: LANGUAGE POLICY AND LANGUAGE RIGHTS IN THE CARIBBEAN (2011-2012, II)

CreoleTalk Discuss the Definition of Creole, Dialect, Vernacular, Pidgin, Patois, AAVE, African American Vernacular English, Irish American Vernacular English, Haitian Creole.

SARGASSO: LANGUAGE POLICY AND LANGUAGE RIGHTS IN THE CARIBBEAN (2011-2012, II)

INTRODUCTION
Celia Brown-Blake and Don E. Walicek
ESSAYS
Celia Brown-Blake & Hubert Devonish, “Planning for Language Rights in the Caribbean: The Birth of the Charter on Language Policy and Language Rights in the Creole-speaking Caribbean”
Marta Dijkhoff, “Language Policy and Language Rights in the Creole-Speaking Caribbean”
Alicia Pousada, “Linguists in the Resolution of Caribbean Language Problems”
R. Sandra Evans, “Language Rights and Legal Wrongs:” Examining the Right
to an Interpreter in the Magistrates’ Courts in St. Lucia”
Clive Forrester, “Ethics, Conscience, and Just Desert: The Linguistic Performance of Sentencing in the Jamaican Courtroom”
Yves Dejean, “Identifying the Standards for Haitian Creole”
Yves Dejean, “Réflexions sur un projet d’Académie du créole haïtien”
INTERVIEW
Linguistics for the Caribbean Region: An Interview with Mervyn Alleyne Interview by Don E. Walicek
IMAGES & POETRY
Rubén Rolando, Selections from “Lenguas Perdidas”
Earl McKenzie, “Ekphrasis” and “The Plums of Summer”
SPECIAL SECTION: LANGUAGE & THE LAW
Introduction to the Jamaican Translation of the Text ‘Fundamental Rights and Freedoms in Jamaica’s Constitution’
Di nyuu chapta chrii fi di Jamiekan kanstityuushan we paaliment paas ina 2011, Translated by Dadre White and Tina Whyte
The New Chapter Three of the Jamaican Constitution Passed by Parliament in 2011
The issue can be purchased for $10 (US dollars, money order or check made out to the U of Puerto Rico).  The address for payments:
SARGASSO
P.O. Box 22831, UPR Station
San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931-2831
The Sargasso Sea is a 2,000,000-square-mile ellipse-shaped region of the North Atlantic Ocean extending south and east of Bermuda. The Sea’s special properties are a result of it lying in the center of a huge oval of relatively still waters bounded by ocean currents, including the Gulf Stream, which circle it clockwise, sort of like the eye of a very huge, very, very slow, permanent hurricane. Not only did Columbus encounter the Sargasso Sea, he is credited with its discovery, being the first person to leave an account of it.