‘Sound Portraits From Bulgaria: A Journey To A Vanished World’

Martin Koenig: “Sound Portraits from Bulgaria and the Balkans: Photographs and Recordings”

Princeton Library
Wednesday, October 23, 6:30 pm
8:30 pm
65 Witherspoon Street
Princeton, NJ 08542 United States
Phone:609-924-9529
https://princetonlibrary.org/event/martin-koenig-sound-portraits-from-bulgaria-and-the-balkans-photographs-and-recordings/

Smithsonian Folkways Presents  ‘Sound Portraits From Bulgaria: A Journey To A Vanished World’ (Out Nov. 1)

Martin Koenig arrived in Bulgaria in 1966 at age 27 with letters of recommendation from fellow recordist Alan Lomax and anthropologist Margaret Mead, an educator and cultural documentarian determined to study the folk dances of rural communities throughout the country. As he travelled, absorbing the culture and speaking with the people he encountered, Koenig became captivated by the earthy and ancient, yet very much alive, music he heard all around him. He recorded the music he was exposed to, and took photographs of not only dancers, but the village singers and musicians as well as those going about their daily lives around these hotbeds of creative expression. Enraptured with the people of Bulgaria, their way of life and the art they made, he returned several times between 1966 and ‘79, documenting everything he could.
Press Release

Sound Portraits from Bulgaria: A Journey to a Vanished World
Thursday, October 17, 2019, 6 p.m.

Program Locations:
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center, Bruno Walter Auditorium
https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2019/10/17/sound-portraits-bulgaria-journey-vanished-world

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Free – Online Reservation required

For over two decades, starting in the mid-1960s, ethnographer and Balkan dance specialist, Martin Koenig researched and documented traditional Bulgarian music and dance forms in their original settings. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, Koenig comes to the Library to reveal a forgotten and vanishing culture with archival photographs and audio.

Reserve your general admission seat HERE starting  September 17th, 2019.

Free General Admission Ticket
FM assistive listening devices available upon request with one week minimum advance notice.
Call 212-340-0918 or 212-340-0951 to request these devices.
ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request. Please submit your request at least two weeks in advance by emailing accessibility@nypl.org.

more on Traditional Dance

Roots of Folkdance
Hoedowns are the roots of southern square dancing. Jamison
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Arts/Dance.html

Roots of Folkdance
other world cultures. ROOTS OF MODERN DANCE Performing Arts Dance
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Arts/Traditional_Arts.html

Educational CyberPlayGround: TRAUDE SCHRATTENECKER and Karen Ellis Biographical…
Toronto starting in 1970. Dance creates and develops rhythmical
https://edu-cyberpg.com/AboutUs/bioTraude.html

Educational CyberPlayGround: Motivating children towards music by Greta Pedersen
in the marching band and dance band music of the day, which was
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Music/History_Of_Jazz.html

K12 PlayGround Find a School Discover the right school for your child.

K12Playground.com Find a School Discover the right school for your child.

Submit or Update Your School or Organization.

Once you’ve located your school, update the information about the school such as the amenities, features or programs that make this school special.

Find and compare K12 Schools and School Districts in the USA and Territories.

A CURRENT ACCEPTABLE PREJUDICE by Jonathan Weiss Esq.

“Old white men.” The words separate are sometimes used pejoratively. All together they are considered by many “liberals” and many in the media as a crucial criticism. “Old” creates the most disdain. Rather than being considered an achievement implying future contribution, the years accumulated is considered negative.

Reactionaries often attack “political correctness” as a cover for the attitude and practice of racism, xenophobia, nativism, misogyny, wealth against poor, and disparagement of different gender and sexual practices – in their array of intolerant and discriminatory practices. But beyond all the despicable perspectives, with associated practices, glimmers a point.

Well out of population proportion, Blacks are now omnipresent in most ads, plays, and movies. Obligatory Blacks, generally cast as superior or educated, are featured in almost every dramatic or commercial presentation.. While it is true, there are many aspiring and unemployed actors available, to give preference on the basis on melanin amount should not be a functioning criterion. All actors should be allowed to play different parts. Forrest Whitaker portrays an excellent “Hughie”; Glenda Jackson a riveting “King Lear”, But the converse? – a white performer in “A Raison in the Sun”, Sam Rea as Lady Macbeth? (Shakespeare’s plays, historians say, were only performed by men). A few years back the bourgeoise identity advocate Spike Lee caused a furor to make sure that he, not a white man, direct “Malcolm X” failing to do justice to the charismatic, inspiring, and politically profound leader – who should have continued through old age. (Can you imagine Gershwin writing an opera, called ”Porgy and Bess” about a poor Black community (“Catfish Row”? Who would present it, if written now?)

This color preference, with a sprinkling of Asiatics, neglects Latinos and American Indians. (Indeed, the opposite is true when one watches an Atlanta Braves home game crowd do a publicly guided “tomahawk” while “nock- a-homer” displays an Indian character dancing around a wigwam.) This constant presence has created a backlash, to excite those with conscious or unconscious race resentment, while it satisfies only a select elite with a hope it improves markets or escapes criticism. It is hard to see it justified as “reparations” or “affirmative action” – concepts themselves subject to serious challenge.

The commendable Seth Meyers features a Black, a Puerto Rican Lesbian, and an Asian as writers on his late night show. The Black and Lesbian tell jokes labeled as “Jokes Seth Can Not Tell” with apparent lesbian and Black punchlines. On the other hand, he constantly jokes about “old men.” Most of the media stars including the talented Trevor Noah (bi-racial identifying as Black) do constantly: how they have lost their wits, are politically reactionary, look disgusting in a gym, particularly naked, lost their sexuality and attractiveness, can not do many tasks. Trevor Noah started his interview with Bernie Sanders “Are you too old?” to receive the appropriate reply: “Are you a bigot?” Let us note that his message seems to resonate with the younger voters in current polls putting him first in the current carnival of Democratic candidates.

The “old white men” accusation is frequently leveled at Congress with age complaints about Judges. (Where would the Supreme Court be without Ruth Bader Ginsberg in her mid 80s?). Seniority, in the Republican Party, is a problem endemic to the Rules. But, if we remove “white” from the triad, we all should celebrate the principled leadership from Elijah Cummings and John Lewis in the Congress. We should be delighted with Alexandra Ocasia Cortez for all she says and does, as well as thrilled that she replaced a 9 term Congressman, not because of his age, but because he was a retrograde party hack. An “old white man” has a long history to evaluate while he should have learned and grown politically, practically, and philosophically. Wisdom acquired constitutes a virtue.

Making “old white men” an acceptable criticism anywhere is wrong. Individuals are to be judged on their merits and potentialities. To accept “old white me” automatically as a negative cliche is discrimination wherever it occurs. Accepting the deplorable degradation and/or inequality practiced against “people of color”, women, and the poor, emphasizing the continued damage done to Native Americans, Latinos (now particularly Puerto Rican and Mexicans) and those with “different” sexual preferences requires real action rather than an elitist attack on another group.

The general social conditions are deplorable with poverty, racism, and exclusion of the oppressed from satisfying their needs and fulfilling their potentialities. Such a horror is not reduced by selected public featuring of anointed “people of color”, gender and age, but rather creates an anger for those so stigmatized and an excuse for those who are prejudiced. Occasional fawning obeisance to a “legend” exaggerates rather than minimizes a general “ageist” culture, particularly prominent in the media. Mandatory retirement, particularly in an era with pensions (promises for future payment to forgo present payments) and public benefits destroyed, creates poverty and wastes resources for the work place. The spectacle of the “elderly” serving at fast food places is not ennobling vision.

Nothing is inherently wrong for a human being to be “white”, “old”, or “man” The first, of course, has varied in definition (once including some Italians and Jews), the second an ascription dependent on societal longevity generalities, the third a biological classification. Together the words offer only an irrelevant characterization. Not redeemed by reverse preference, it perpetuates bigotry, pure and simple. Instead of a condemned, as an irrelevant, perspective, this pernicious prejudice is prevalent and reinforced by mass media for a “balance” based a fraudulent fad of “diversity”.

Old white men.” Honor the best of them. Respect all of them.

K12 End of the Year Classroom Activities and Games

K12 end of the school year activities, #CootieCatcher #Games and the history of those folded paper finger manipulated toys.

Make Cootie Catchers, Games, Music Games, Memory Certificates, Saying Goodbye to Teacher, Memory Video Project, Collect Children’s songs games chants, Preschool graduation Party, (BEFORE CHATBOTs) produce a chatterbox, fortune teller, You May Also Connect Autograph Books to the National Standards: FINE ARTS: Visual Arts GRADES K – 12 Understanding the Visual Arts In Relation to History and Cultures.

The Cootie Catcher Game

cite: Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc.
https://www.edu-cyberpg.com/
Title: K12 END-OF-YEAR ACTIVITIES K12 end of the year activities that combine fun and learning. Find great ideas for the LAST DAYS OF SCHOOL AND THROUGH THE SUMMER
3/31/2019
https://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/newteacherlastday.html

#LICE CATCHERS #LOUSE CATCHERS #COOTIE CATCHERS FORTUNE TELLERS OR COOTIE CATCHERS The history of those folded paper finger manipulated toys.

“Sue Samuelson traces the origin of cooties to the earliest use of cootie,” meaning body louse, as 1917.
Fortune tellers: Opies’ Lore and Language of School children
We all know “no more pencils no more books no more students dirty looks” but do you know when they first appeared?

HOW TO MAKE A COOTIE CATCHER!

HOW TO PLAY WITH A COOTIE CATHER FORTUNE TELLER

MAKING AN AUTOGRAPH BOOK

Autograph books are a significant piece of Americana, recollecting the times, but they have been given little attention in the body of folklore.


25 JUMBO INDEX CARD, RIBBON, HOLE PUNCHER
www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwH3G2e4hmg

You May Also Connect Autograph Books to the Core Standards:

FINE ARTS: Visual Arts GRADES K – 12
Understanding the Visual Arts In Relation to History and Cultures
LANGUAGE ARTS: English GRADES K – 12 Reading for Perspective Communication Skills Applying Knowledge

Autograph books are a significant piece of Americana, recollecting the times, but they have been given little attention in the body of folklore. Such books have a history, possibly continuing the German tradition of writing sentiments of affection in family keepsake albums and of friendship in school notebooks.

Try this on in a yearbook or someone’s autograph book:

If you think you are in love,
And there is still some question,
Don’t worry much about it.
It may be indigestion.

End of the School Year ACTIVITIES

LINK TO YOUR SCHOOL CLASSROOM STEM  COOTIE CATCHER VIDEO

K12PlayGround.com

Register – login
find or update your school information 

Add your school
or Update your School information page,
|
then link to your video project

CAN I TELL YOUR FORTUNE?  GET “FLEXED”
HEXAFLEXAGON  Richard Feynman

NEVER FLEXAGATE WITHOUT SCISSORS

BUILD YOUR HEXAFLEXAGON SKILLS

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc. K12 Newsletters

K12 Education STEM Projects

SCIENCE – Home Economics – Math – Environment


Cleaning Appliances

VIDEO

Refrigerator and Freezer
The best cleaner is a mix of vinegar and water.
And for clean air, use fresh coffee grounds in a container with some holes in it in your refrigerator.
Coffee is better than baking soda for absorbing odors.
Washing Machine
Tang is the best way to clean your washing machine.
Front loading washing machine, use 1/4 cup of tang drink mix to an empty machine.
Run it through a basic cycle using hot water. This cleans the mineral deposits left from soap and also cleans the pipes.
When you use Tang in your front loading washing machine, once a week for four weeks and then once a month, and it’s just once a month on your dishwasher too!
Dishwasher
– add two cups of bleach to the bottom of an empty machine and run through a wash cycle.
– Then add four cups of white vinegar to the bottom and run through another cycle.


Homemade Cleaners
http://thefrugalgirls.com/homemade-cleaners
Laundry Detergent Recipe
Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/08/how-to-make-homemade-laundry-detergent.html

  1. 1/2 Cup: Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda {not Baking Soda}
  2. 1/2 Cup: Borax 1/3 Bar of Fels-Naptha Soap {you could also use Ivory soap, but if using Ivory… use the whole bar}
  3. Bucket {2 gallon size or larger} Empty laundry detergent containers or bucket with lid to store detergent.

Homemade Fabric Softener Recipe
Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/10/homemade-fabric-softener.html
6 cups HOT water
3 cups White Vinegar
2 cups Suave Hair Conditioner {Refreshing Waterfall or Coconut scents}
Mix conditioner & hot water well, until conditioner is dissolved completely.
Add the vinegar, and mix well.
Store in a large container {empty fabric softener container, empty large vinegar bottle, etc}
Pour into a downy ball… or use approx. 2 tbsp. in the fabric softener spot in your laundry machine… then wash!

comments:
I also use the homemade laundry detergent in the dry form and use just plain white vinegar as a softener. I was amazed at how well the vinegar worked to soften my clothes … with no vinegar smell.
I dilute regular fabric softener 2x so end up with 3x the amount and use that as a liquid or leave it all in a bucket and throw sponges in. wring out the sponge and throw 1 or 2 in the dryer as dryer sheets
I have an HE washer and dryer. I have been using this homemade fabric softener for about 6 months now and I could not be happier. It works great. Sometimes my laundry used to smell after washing and drying it but not anymore. I also starting leaving my washer machine door open a little. Again, this homemade fabric softener is great and I have definitely saved money. I use Suave or V05 and try to keep the scent something like a breeze or fruity scent.
I have a frontloader as well. I have been using frontload machines for 14 yrs now. The vinegar is great as an additive for the frontload machines as it cleans the machine as well. Run the mixture through the dispenser :). i also use 3 cups white vinegar & hot water through my machine regularly as a cleaner. use the tray dispenser to dispere 1 cup & dump the other 2 cups on the inside add a white towel & hot water cycle it all the way through . It keep it fresh & clean isnde no midlew or build up

Homemade Dryer Sheets

Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/01/save-money-on-laundry-cut-dryer-sheets-in-half.html
comments:
I also make my own dryers sheets.
I take a third of a bottle of your favorite fabric softner and pour it into an empty gallon jug. (cleaned milk jug works great!) Fill the rest of the way with tap water and shake. Pour some into a small open plastic container. Take two new (plain cheap) sponges and cut them in half. Place cut sponges in softner mix and then pull one out, ringing it slightly and add to your dryer. These work great and you can just keep using the sponges again and again.
I made a mixture of 2 cups of cheep suave hair conditioner and 4 cups of water. Pour the conditioner in a pot on low heat add water and pour it into any container you can seal I used an old icecream bucket, I bought a pack of 6 sponges and cut them in half throw them in the bucket and when you need a dryer sheet wring out excess liquid from one sponge so it isn’t dripping wet when it goes in the dryer and you can re use these over and over and the liquid mixture will last a long time I have laundry for 7 people and it works great to save money.
I use an old washcloth: pour just a small amount of liquid fabric softener on it and toss it in the dryer. It works fantastic! It’s way more economical than adding the liquid to the washing machine.

Homemade Fabreze Recipe
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2013/03/diy-homemade-febreeze-recipe.html

Directions:
Add 3 tbsp. Fabric Softener {like your favorite scent of Downy} to empty spray bottle
Fill spray bottle with approx. 2 – 3 cups hot water. {depending on size of bottle}
Add in 1 tbsp. Baking Soda Mix, and enjoy!!
Portions can be adjusted slightly, depending on the size of your spray bottle.

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround K12 Newsletters May 1

May is celebrated as the Music Month:

MUSIC EDUCATION, CLASSROOM RESOURCES AND MUSIC LAW
IDEAS FOR CLASSROOM USE
THE HISTORY OF JAZZ
Question: Can You Guess who this is?
A Grandson of slaves, a boy was born in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans known as the “Back of Town.” His father abandoned the family when the child was an infant, His mother became a prostitute and the boy and his sister had to live with their grandmother. Early in life he proved to be gifted for music and with three other kids he sang in the streets of New Orleans. His first gains were the coins that were thrown to them. A Jewish family, Karnofsky, who had immigrated from Lithuania to the USA had pity for the 7-year-old boy and brought him into their home. Initially given ‘work’ in the house, to feed this hungry child. There he remained and slept in this Jewish families home where, for the first time in his life he was treated with kindness and tenderness. When he went to bed, Mrs. Karnovsky sang him a Russian Lullaby that he would sing with her. Later, he learned to sing and play several Russian and Jewish songs. Over time, this boy became the adopted son of this family. The Karnofskys gave him money to buy his first musical instrument; as was the custom in the Jewish families.
They sincerely admired his musical talent. Later, when he became a professional musician and composer, he used these Jewish melodies in compositions, such as St. James Infirmary and Go Down Moses. The little black boy grew up and wrote a book about this Jewish family who had adopted him in 1907.
In memory of this family and until the end of his life, he wore a star of David and said that in this family he had learned “how to live real life and determination.”
Answer: You might recognize his name. This little boy was called Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong. Louis Armstrong proudly spoke fluent Yiddish!
New Orleans-based Musicologist John Baron discusses Louis Armstrong’s relationship with the Karnofskys, a New Orleans Jewish family he worked for, and who helped him buy his first musical instrument. Interview by Neil W. Levin.

Have a Great American Thanksgiving and here's your Folkie Music Menu

Each year American Routes americanroutes.org celebrates Thanksgiving weekend with words and music from the National Heritage Fellows Concert in Washington DC. Since 1982 the National Endowment for the Arts has presented the fellowships. It’s America’s highest award in Folk & Traditional Arts. We’ll hear a mix of this year’s fellows live from the stage as well as great recordings of those from years gone by: The Holmes Brothers, Doc Watson, Tremé Brass Band, Michael Doucet with Beausoleil, Boozoo Chavis, Flaco Jimenez, Mavis Staples, Del McCoury, John Cephas & Phil Wiggins, Andy Statman and many more. Blues and jazz, Cajun and zydeco, Téjano and klezmer, bluegrass and gospel as well as Native American voices, make a cornucopia of sounds and stories for the holiday!
All from American Routes, the weekly public radio program devoted to the music and culture of New Orleans, the Gulf South and beyond. American Routes is produced with Tulane University’s School of Liberal Arts and distributed nationally by Public Radio Exchange.
This Week’s Playlist:
Hour 1
The Maryland and Delaware Singing and Praying Bands live performance live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Black Cat on the Line” (Cephas) Cephas and Wiggins From Richmond to Atlanta (Bullseye Blues)
“Big Black Train” (Johnson/Sherry) The Earls of Leicester The Earls of Leicester (Rounder)
“House of the Rising Sun” (Ray/Holmes) Doc & Richard Watson Third Generation Blues (Sugar Hill)
Instrumental: “Fiddler’s Dream/Whistling Rufus/Ragtime Annie” (Trad.) Doc Watson Foundation: The Doc Watson Guitar Instrumental Collection 1964-1998 (Sugar Hill)
Kevin Doyle on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Parlez-Nous A Boire (Speak to Us of Drinking)” (Trad.) Beausoleil Parlez-Nous A Boire & More (Arhoolie)
“Dog Hill” (Chavis/Simien) Boozoo Chavis Boozoo Chavis (Electra Nonesuch)
“Ay Te Dejo en San Antonio” (Jimenez) Flaco Jimenez Ay Te Dejo en San Antonio (Arhoolie)
Instrumental: “Viva Seguin” (Jimenez) Flaco Jimenez Arriba El Norte (Rounder)
“Descarga Cachao” (Lopez) Cachao Descarga Cachao (Epic)
Cowboy Donley live performance and on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Sing On” (Trad.) The Treme Brass Band New Orleans Music! (Mardi Gras)
End Bed: “Tipitina” (Byrd) Allen Toussaint American Routes original recording
Hour 2
Rufus White live performance and on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
Yvonne Walker Keshick on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“On the King’s Highway” (Statman) Andy Statman Old Brooklyn (Shefa)
Vera Nakonechny on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
Instrumental: “One in Nine” (Statman) Andy Statman Old Brooklyn (Shefa)
Henry Arquette on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Loggin’ Man” (McCoury) The Del McCoury Band The Cold Hard Facts (Rounder)
“John Henry” (Trad.) John Jackson Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down (Arhoolie)
Caroline Mazloomi on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“I’ll Take You There” (Isbell) The Staple Singers The Muscle Shoals Sound (Rhino)
Instrumental: “Opus de Soul” (Thomas/Isbell) Albert King, Steve Cropper, Pops Staples Jammed Together (Stax)
The Holmes Brothers live performance and on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
End Bed: “Will the Circle Be Unbroken” (Carter) 2014 NEA Heritage Fellows live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014

Girls change the world and can do anything

Educational CyberPlayGround: Websites for Girls and Young Women who want to be involved with Technology
WEBSITES FOR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN
How to help girls get into technology.
Real women engineers and other role models for girls.
Changing Girls’ Attitudes About Computers

“Don’t worry your pretty little head over it.”
Special Edition
Computer Wonder Women
National Women’s History Month
GIRLS WHO CODE: GIRLS CAN DO ANYTHING – GIRLS CAN CHANGE THE WORD
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr6b4nwo-5k

[CreoleTalk] Tenth Creolistics Workshop: Call for Papers

Call for papers
Tenth Creolistics Workshop: “Innovations” – with special attention to parallels between creole and sign language creation
Aarhus University, Denmark, 8-10 April 2015
http://www.creolisticsX.dk
Background of the Creolistics Workshop
The Creolistics Workshop, which has previously been held in London (UK), Amsterdam (NL), Giessen (D) and Aarhus (DK), has a long tradition for being a forum of exchange and inspiration in the creolistics community. For the tenth edition, the main focus will be on innovations, primarily in creoles and sign languages, but also in other types of languages where contact has played an important role.
Creole studies have traditionally focused on continuation and universals, discussing for instance the contributions of the lexifiers and substrates. In past decades, an important body of literature in creolistics has been produced with the goal of weighing the influences from the various contributing languages to creole formation. However, much less attention has been given to innovations, in particular lexical, semantic, syntactic and typological aspects that cannot easily be attributed to the known input languages.
Therefore, the aim of this workshop will be to shift the focus from a historical approach to creoles to a more cognitively-oriented framework whose primary goal will be to explain why certain strategies and structures are innovated and selected in the creation of new language varieties, while others are not.
As sign languages have been argued to show social and structural commonalities with creoles, special attention is given to Deaf Sign Languages.
 
Parallels between creole and sign language creation
The idea that sign languages can be considered creole languages is based on a variety of factors, and is often linked to the particular sociohistorical circumstances under which they emerged and evolved. Especially since the documentation of the genesis of Nicaraguan Sign Language (NSL), where researchers pointed out the sudden development of the language going through a process reminiscent of an initial pidgin stage with subsequent creolization, sign language students have looked at creole studies for inspiration. With few exceptions, this inspiration was more or less unidirectional. The time now seems ripe to cross-fertilize creole studies with research on Sign Languages.
There are several areas of similarity between creoles and sign languages: both are created and innovated from the bottom up, that is, the first generation of (new) sign language users modify, create and unify word signs and structures, just as may have happened in the genesis of creole languages. 90% of deaf children are born in hearing families, which means that the children will be better signers than their parents – just like, at some point in history, children creole speakers were.
There are also structural similarities between signed and spoken languages, such as aspect-dominance, preverbal marking of tense-mood-aspect, the marking of existentials with a verb meaning possession and the use of a sentence-final completive marker.
Furthermore, there are sociolinguistic similarities in that both types of languages are minority languages with low prestige, often lacking recognition and whose speakers and signers themselves belong to stigmatized communities.
Finally, both creole languages and sign languages have been diffused between areas, even between continents, for instance American Sign Language has its roots in French Sign Language rather than being the result of a local creation. Similarly, West African Pidgin English and Caribbean English creoles are historically connected, and several other pidgins/creoles are known to have spawned several daughter languages (e.g. the different Melanesian Pidgin Englishes).
One goal of Creolistics X is to bring together the field of creole studies together with that of sign linguistics so as to establish possible connections between the two types of languages, centering around the theme of innovations. Specifically, the development from pidgin to creole as compared to that from home-signs to full-fledged sign language offers an interesting and potentially fruitful research venue, with possible implications for, among others, general theoretical linguistics and evolutionary linguistics.
 
Call for papers
For this workshop, we would like to invite contributions from scholars working on creoles and sign languages from a diachronic or synchronic perspective. We welcome especially papers that deal with outcomes of contact situations where innovative expansions of the grammatical system can be observed, compared to earlier stages or to the contributing languages. We define innovations here broadly so as to encompass any distinction that is found neither in the lexifier, nor in the substrate languages.
Particularly welcome are contributions which touch upon the commonalities between sign languages and creoles, so that possible underlying cognitive mechanisms common to both language types, regardless of the modality they use, can be identified. Other topics of potential interest include, but are not limited to, how innovations spread and diffuse within a community (from ontogeny to phylogeny), or studies that investigate possible links between creole language and sign language genesis.
In the traditional spirit of openness of preceding Creolistics Workshops, other topics in the area of pidgin and creole languages will also be welcome.
 
Abstracts
The length of abstracts should not exceed 500 words. Please send your anonymized abstract to creolisticsX@gmail.com – remember to provide the name(s) of the author(s) and affiliation in the mail itself, not on the abstract. The deadline for submitting your abstract is on October 1, 2014. Notification of acceptance can be expected around November 1, 2014.
 
Homepage
http://www.creolisticsX.dk
On the homepage, you will find pratical information in connection with the event, as well as a bibliography of studies linking sign languages and creoles.
 
Sign language interpretation will be available for presenters at the conference.
Local organization
Julie Bakken Jepsen
Peter Bakker
Finn Borchsenius
Aymeric Daval-Markussen
Carsten Levisen
Eeva Sippola
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CreoleTALK Mailing List
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Linguistics/