‘Sound Portraits From Bulgaria: A Journey To A Vanished World’

Martin Koenig: “Sound Portraits from Bulgaria and the Balkans: Photographs and Recordings”

Princeton Library
Wednesday, October 23, 6:30 pm
8:30 pm
65 Witherspoon Street
Princeton, NJ 08542 United States
Phone:609-924-9529
https://princetonlibrary.org/event/martin-koenig-sound-portraits-from-bulgaria-and-the-balkans-photographs-and-recordings/

Smithsonian Folkways Presents  ‘Sound Portraits From Bulgaria: A Journey To A Vanished World’ (Out Nov. 1)

Martin Koenig arrived in Bulgaria in 1966 at age 27 with letters of recommendation from fellow recordist Alan Lomax and anthropologist Margaret Mead, an educator and cultural documentarian determined to study the folk dances of rural communities throughout the country. As he travelled, absorbing the culture and speaking with the people he encountered, Koenig became captivated by the earthy and ancient, yet very much alive, music he heard all around him. He recorded the music he was exposed to, and took photographs of not only dancers, but the village singers and musicians as well as those going about their daily lives around these hotbeds of creative expression. Enraptured with the people of Bulgaria, their way of life and the art they made, he returned several times between 1966 and ‘79, documenting everything he could.
Press Release

Sound Portraits from Bulgaria: A Journey to a Vanished World
Thursday, October 17, 2019, 6 p.m.

Program Locations:
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center, Bruno Walter Auditorium
https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2019/10/17/sound-portraits-bulgaria-journey-vanished-world

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Free – Online Reservation required

For over two decades, starting in the mid-1960s, ethnographer and Balkan dance specialist, Martin Koenig researched and documented traditional Bulgarian music and dance forms in their original settings. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, Koenig comes to the Library to reveal a forgotten and vanishing culture with archival photographs and audio.

Reserve your general admission seat HERE starting  September 17th, 2019.

Free General Admission Ticket
FM assistive listening devices available upon request with one week minimum advance notice.
Call 212-340-0918 or 212-340-0951 to request these devices.
ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request. Please submit your request at least two weeks in advance by emailing accessibility@nypl.org.

more on Traditional Dance

Roots of Folkdance
Hoedowns are the roots of southern square dancing. Jamison
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Arts/Dance.html

Roots of Folkdance
other world cultures. ROOTS OF MODERN DANCE Performing Arts Dance
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Arts/Traditional_Arts.html

Educational CyberPlayGround: TRAUDE SCHRATTENECKER and Karen Ellis Biographical…
Toronto starting in 1970. Dance creates and develops rhythmical
https://edu-cyberpg.com/AboutUs/bioTraude.html

Educational CyberPlayGround: Motivating children towards music by Greta Pedersen
in the marching band and dance band music of the day, which was
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Music/History_Of_Jazz.html

The beginning of cloud music streaming technology

The beginning of cloud based music streaming technology starts in 1899.

There is Nothing new under the sun, so if you were born after 1985 this may sound like fossil hunting, however this really happened!

Swing Hostess is a  comedy that shows a fictional company named Jukebox Emporium Company using the real technology – serving music from vinyl records through the telephone wire that allowed Jukebox users to hear the requested songs.

Watch Swing Hostess 1944 Comedy 

Women’s Work

Lots of sexist, nasty comments about “those kind of women”

33:38 Jukebox User Request to the operator:
How About the Cook Stove Special?
Yeah, you know Home on the Range. 🙂

14:00 The Job Training explains the “File” system
In the beginning of Wired Music technology, you ordered your song to play by telephone. The company service had a central office with operators who loaded disks onto record players. It only served a limited area of office buildings and other businesses. The bandwidth of the premium phone lines was better than a standard phone line (300-3000 Hz), but still not exactly “hi-fi”, but for 78 records it was good enough.

► 34:00 Get the marines! we’ve got a war to wage.

► 34:24  The company phone operator receives a phone call from the Juke Box “User” who has paid .25¢, .10¢, or .05¢ cents to hear the vinyl record spin the requested song through the telephone wire to the customer/user who paid to hear it.

► From vinyl records, cassettes, CDs, Napster files, mp3, mp4, wav etc, ipod players, cell phones to Streaming companies where it is no longer necessary to own the file.

Now we pay $10.00 monthly for all you can eat modern cloud based streaming tech companies when a user can choose from millions of files.

The Shyvers Multiphone, released in 1939 by Kenneth C. Shyvers, was an early model of a coin-operated phonograph (also known as a jukebox). It allowed patrons at restaurants, cafes and bars to play music at their table, and worked through telephone lines. The user inserted the necessary amount of coins, and was connected to a team of all-female disc jockeys in Seattle, who manually put on the selected song on a phonograph, playing the music through the telephone connection. At the height of the product’s popularity, the 8,000 Multiphones were used in various establishments primarily on the west coast.
– Shyvers’ 1947 patent for his music box design
– Development of Telephone Line Broadcasting Systems
-A Centralized Music Library

The Multiphone was a music selection device that operated over telephone lines mostly in Seattle, Tacoma and Olympia, Washington from 1939 to 1959.

It was created by Kenneth and Lois Shyvers of the Seattle, Washington area. This man also invented the pinball machine. The Multiphone is a version of a jukebox wall box.

These units were typically placed on tables, counters or bars. A patron could deposit a coin and speak with a telephone operator standing at a turntable at the Central Music studio, who would then play a selection in the speaker at the bottom of the Multiphone. These units became popular because they had a record range of 170 whereas jukeboxes only had a record range of 20-48.

How it worked

These units sat on tables, counters, and bars. The system required two leased telephone lines, one for the multiphone, one for the loudspeakers on the wall that were connected to the record playing station. First you would select from the 170 choices of tunes, drop the correct amount of dimes in the coin slot at the top of the machine, for your selections. The two lights in the middle of the unit would then light up, and thru one of the leased telephone lines the disc jockey would be alerted and then they would talk direct to you thru the speaker in the top of the unit to find out your choices. You would give the numbered choices, they would then be played, with the sound coming thru the four inch speaker in the bottom of the unit. These units became popular because they had a record range of 170 whereas jukeboxes only had 20-24. The jukebox was remodeled to play 180 45 rpm records and the multiphone could not compete and went out of business in 1959. This unit is buffed cast aluminum and has been rewired to plug in and see the lights work. There is also speaker wire attached to hook up to your unit if so desired. The condition is excellent for its age. All original except the cord, no dents, no rust and no pitting. …
Empire State Building Shyvers Jukebox Selector Pic 

The Multiphone
played an important role in the evolution of the jukebox, an invention that grew to become a staple of its time and is still often used in cafes and restaurants to recreate the temporality of the mid 20th century.
The first recorded coin operated phonograph was presented in 1889, in a public demonstration at the Palais Royal Restaurant in San Francisco on November 23, 1889.

Louis T. Glass, the operator of this initial model, is credited as “the father of the concept.” Before delving into the phonograph world, Glass worked as a telegraph operator at Western Union, but then left the company with the advent of the telephone, investing in various telephone companies in Oakland and San Francisco. He eventually became the general manager of the Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Co. After his successful investments, he then partnered with businessman William S. Arnold to further develop the coin-operated phonograph.

Though Glass is considered to be the “father” of the jukebox, he and Arnold only filed a patent for the “Coin Actuated Attachment for Phonographs,” not a completely functional coin-operated phonograph in 1889.

The people of the 1930s and 1940s had coin-operated music players.

The Multiphone and jukeboxes created a new “social practice” of listening to the same music together as media scholar Jose van Dijck says in his article

“Record and Hold: Popular Music between personal and Collective memory.”

According to Dijck, a listener’s memory of music cannot be removed from the context in which it was experienced. For the people during the age of the Multiphone and jukeboxes, the conversations at bars and diners about selecting a song to play made a special place in listeners’ minds. More importantly, this very practice of going to a public place to listen to music is the effect of the technology’s power to create new rituals and thinking as media scholar, Marshall McLuhan discusses in his pivotal work, “The Medium Is The Message.”

2019 The Music Modernization Act passes

Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) ruled to increase royalty payments to songwriters and music publishers from music streaming companies by nearly 44 percent, the biggest rate increase granted in CRB history. These rates will go into effect for interactive streaming and limited download services like Amazon, Apple, Google, and Spotify for the years 2018-2022, and will transform how songwriters are paid by these interactive streaming services.

Largest Ever Copyright Royalty Board Ruling Transforms How Songwriters are Paid

This was a hearing pitting songwriters and music publishers against five technology companies, including three of the largest companies in the world (Apple, Amazon and Google), which sought to reduce the already low rate of royalties that they pay to songwriters for the use of their music on their streaming services. [monopolies vs. antitrust law]
Even though the songwriters were looking for a per-stream rate, that they did not get, the digital services were fighting to reduce rates, so it is still a victory for them. Streamlined rate terms replace calculations with a simplified formula based on the “greater of” concept. This, under previous conditions, may have involved dozens of computations involving different offerings has been reduced to two variables. Originally, songwriters asked the CRB to grant the greater of 15 cents per 100 streams or $1.06 per user per month, but they did gain ground. Over the last decade, since the beginning of music streaming, writer royalties had been strictly based on a percentage of each streaming service’s revenue, putting them at the mercy of subjective corporate decision-making.

Streaming Revenues

► Broadcasts are considered a public performance, and garner a higher performance license rate. For instance, Rodney Jerkins illustrated the discrepancy in September at the Recording Academy’s District Advocacy Day in Los Angeles by sharing an accounting statement for “As Long As You Love Me,” a top 10 hit for Justin Bieber in 2012. By 2013, Jerkins’ stake in the song generated $146,000 in performance royalties, while streaming revenue from the same period garnered $278 for 38 million Pandora plays and $218 for 34 million YouTube streams.

The US Government Is Forcing Streaming Services to Pay Songwriters 43.8% 2018

The CRB ruling legitimizes and secures higher rates while also allowing for the possible removal of a contested provision in the controversial Music Modernization Act.

1) For the next five years (from 2018 – 2022) the per-stream royalty rate for mechanical royalties will increase incrementally from the current 10.5% of Gross revenue to 15.1% of Gross revenue. For example, in the current model, if a music service made $100 in Gross Revenue, then 10.5% of $100 is the pot of money being paid for all the compositions, an amount of $10.50.   If there are 100 streams in that one month, the service divides $10.50 by 100 streams to get a per stream rate of $0.105 per stream Under the new model, by 2022, the 10.5% will increase to 15.1%.  Doing the same calculation means each stream is now worth $0.151 per stream, an increase of about 40%.

2) If the music services pay the royalties late, they will be charged a late fee.

3) If a record label negotiates a higher rate with Spotify for the recording (as there is no government regulation or rate for recordings), then the royalty rate for the composition can also increase, but with a limit. For example, if a record label gets 70% of Gross Revenue, then the amount being paid for the composition could theoretically increase to above 15.1%.

HOW LONG HAS THIS BEEN GOING ON?

The Telephone Line Music Systems were an interesting but short-lived feature in the history of the jukebox.

► 2019 The CRB mandated 15.1% rate, phasing in over the next five years, is one of the highest rates in the world and is now a rate that must be met under the law.

► 1927 The jukebox business gets a National Automatic Music Company
License http://jukeboxlicense.org/Q_A.htm

►  The first recorded coin operated phonograph was presented in 1889, in a public demonstration at the Palais Royal Restaurant in San Francisco on November 23, 1889.

1888 – 1998 History of the Coin-Operated Phonographs pdf by Gert J. Almind

©®¢÷×¼½¾µ±¤¢%#%+=<>©®¢÷×¼½¾µ±¤¢

 2019 ARSC CONFERENCE The Outreach Committee of the Association for Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC)

53rd annual ARSC Conference, May 8-11, 2019, in Portland, Oregon.

The conference programs will take place at the Benson Hotel, an historic hotel located within walking distance of shopping, dining, and entertainment in the Pearl District, Pioneer Square, and downtown Portland. It is within striking distance of several of the city’s many record stores and Powell’s City of Books. Museums include the Portland Art Museum, Oregon Historical Society, and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry.

The pre-conference workshop, “All Things Digital: Digital Audio Workstation Basics,” will be held on May 8, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., at the Crystal Ballroom, in the Benson Hotel.

A block of rooms has been reserved at special rates for ARSC conference attendees. ARSC’s contracted dates extend from May 7-11. Additionally, the group rate will be honored three days before and three days after, based on availability. The deadline for reservations at the group rate is April 12. After that date, reservations will be accepted on a space available basis at the prevailing rate.

Information about the hotel, room rates, and reservations:

Register early and save! In order to receive the early registration discount, you must register for the conference by April 19. Registration options are available for members and non-members. A special fee waiver program is available for student members. Online registration is now available at:

Conference Details

For general information about the conference, contact Brenda Nelson-Strauss, Conference Manager: bnelsons—-{[@]} —–indiana.edu

To discuss or arrange sponsorship, exhibits, or advertising, contact Curtis Peoples, Assistant Conference Manager: Curtis.Peoples–{[@]} –ttu.edu

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

The preliminary conference schedule (subject to change) PDF

ARSC is dedicated to the preservation and study of sound recordings — in all genres of music and speech, in all formats, and from all periods. Reflecting this broad mission, the upcoming conference offers talks and sessions that will appeal to both professionals and collectors.

Presenters include representatives from archives across North America and Europe, as well as record collectors, dealers, audio engineers and producers, academics, historians, and musicians.

This year’s plenary sessions are:

  • The Music Modernization Act and You
  • Discogs — Collaboration and Crowdsourcing in the 21st Century

Presentations and session topics include:

  • The Fabulous Wailers and the Founding of the Northwest Rock ’n’ Roll Sound
  • Phil Moore: Portland’s Forgotten Groomer of the Stars and Musical Genius
  • Portland’s Native Son Mel Blanc: “Wascally Wabbit” Making “Wecords” 🙂
  • Recent Developments in Audio Retrieval via Optical Methods
  • Discography, Then and Now
  • Recent Developments in the Preservation of Wire Recordings, Magnabelts, and Dictabelts
  • The First Black-Owned Recording Ventures Reissued: Black Swans
  • Jack Penewell: The Paramount Test Pressings and Private Recordings of the Inventor of the Twin-Six Guitar
  • Lacquers: Playback and Content
  • How to Leverage Open Mass Digitization Audio Projects
  • A Century of Concert Spiritual Recordings: The Pioneers
  • The First Days of Disco
  • Preserving NBC Radio Coverage of the Founding of the United Nations
  • Media Preservation and Digitization Principles and Practices
  • Portland’s DIY Scene: The Punk Underground, and Rock and Roll
  • Mahalia Jackson’s Apollo Recordings
  • How Archiving Challenges of the Past Can Be Used to Shape Future Approaches
  • Laurel and Hardy on the Radio: Rare and Well Done
  • Bob Fass and Radio Unnameable: Saving NYC’s Radical Radio History
  • Surveying Archival Yiddish Audio Collections: A Treasure of Yiddish Songs and Stories
  • Where the Music Matters: KEXP Audio Archives Digitization
  • Inventing the Recording in 1900 Spain: The Era of the Gabinetes Fonográficos

Thursday evening  “Ask the Technical Committee”
Friday evening open to the general public “Collectors’ Roundtable”
Friday evening, join Mark Cantor for the music-on-film event, “Music is Where You Find It.” Most fans of music on film are well aware of the riches to be found within feature films, short subjects, SOUNDIES, and television broadcasts. But popular music — jazz, blues, country, ethnic, and just plain “pop” — can be found in many other film genres. In this session, we will explore some of the other sources — often neglected when music on film is discussed — where great performances can be found: fund raising films, industrial shorts, television commercials, raw newsreel footage, experimental and independent films, propaganda pieces, animated cartoons, and home movies. This program is drawn from the Celluloid Improvisations Music Film Archive, perhaps the largest private collection of musical content where 16mm sound film is the primary source. Join us for a session of rarities that includes appearances from Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, Helen Humes, Don Shirley, Big Bill Broonzy, “Cannonball” Adderley, Spade Cooley, Eddie Lang, and many more!

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOP

“All Things Digital: Digital Audio Workstation Basics” is a full-day, hands-on workshop on May 8, at the Benson Hotel. The workshop will give attendees a practical overview of digital audio workstation use for archival applications. It is intended for archivists, collection managers, researchers, students, and anyone who needs to have a working knowledge of digital audio. No previous experience necessary. The workshop is limited to 50 attendees.

OPTIONAL PRE-CONFERENCE TOUR
On May 8, tour Cascade Record Pressing, the first large-production, automated record pressing plant in the Pacific Northwest. It is Oregon’s only vinyl record pressing plant, and produces high-quality records for discerning artists and labels. Learn about all aspects of the record pressing process. Cascade Record Pressing is located about 20 minutes southeast of downtown Portland in Milwaukie. Grace Krause, Project Manager at Cascade Record Pressing, is generously offering a pre-conference tour for a limited number of participants (maximum: 15). Participants meet in the Benson Hotel lobby at 1:15 p.m. for 1:30 p.m. departure for the tour. Transportation will be by shared Uber vehicles. Participants return to hotel at 3:30 p.m. Fee applies (covers transportation).

NEWCOMER ORIENTATION and MENTORING PROGRAM
ARSC invites first-time conference attendees and conference veterans to participate in the Conference Mentoring Program. The program pairs newcomers with long-time members, based on their shared interests. Mentors provide mentees with an orientation to the conference, the association, and its participants in informal meetings over the course of the conference. Only ARSC veterans who are committed to the mentoring program should volunteer.

AWARDS BANQUET

The conference will conclude on Saturday evening with the annual Awards Banquet. Winners of the 2018 Awards for Excellence and 2019 Lifetime Achievement and Distinguished Service awards will be honored. Finalists for the 2019 Awards for Excellence will be announced.

The Association for Recorded Sound Collections is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and study of sound recordings — in all genres of music and speech, in all formats, and from all periods. ARSC is unique in bringing together private individuals and institutional professionals — everyone with a serious interest in recorded sound.

K12Playground.com- GOVERNANCE

K12PlayGround.com
FIND YOUR K12 SCHOOL AND SUBMIT /EDIT YOUR K12 SCHOOL INFORMATION
FOLLOW  http://twitter.com K12PlayGround.com

► “When they substitute their knowledge for ours, we grow angry because they have robbed us of our agency.”

@weeklystandard @smarick Trends in governing have eroded the beliefs, norms and processes by which we learn to be accommodating citizens in a pluralistic, deliberative democracy. By manufacturing rights that limit democratic decision-making, centralizing power in Washington far from citizens’…

►  January 2019 “Within period of 72 hours, Nixon was inaugurated for second term, LBJ died, Roe v. Wade was decided, Vietnam War settlement was announced–all 46 years ago this month. ~ @BeschlossDC

Ajit Pai Refuses to Brief Congress About Why Bounty Hunters Can Buy Cell Phone Location Data

Ex-RNC Chair Puts Trump-Supporting Senators On Notice: ‘It’s All Collusion’

► Former Trump Tax Attorney Ed Burke’s Office Raided by Feds
It was reported in 2016 that Ald. Ed Burke’s firm helped Donald Trump trim $11.7M off his property taxes
https://news.wttw.com/2016/05/03/ald-burkes-law-firm-helps-trump-trim-117m-property-taxes

Here’s What I’m Telling US Congress about Data Breaches

► “Your regular reminder that Equifax still exists. Everyone who was running the company when 148 million Americans’ data was stolen is still rich, and now their former lawyer is running the office at the Federal Trade Commission that’s supposed to investigate them.”

►  Montgomery County PA Announces Purchase of New Voting Machines

Songwriters Score Win Over Streaming Services With Pay Hike

National Music Publishers’ Association
The Copyright Royalty Board ruled that songwriters will get at least a 15.1% share of streaming revenues over the next five years, from a previous 10.5%. The CRB’s decision will require streaming services to pay 15.1 percent of revenue to songwriters and publishers, up from 10.5 percent. The court also issued a ruling regarding a late fee, which will force digital music services to pay songwriters faster, or be subject to a significant penalty.
Amazon, Apple, Google, Pandora and Spotify compelled to pay more for the use of music.
Pryor Cashman who represented NMPA and NSAI in the litigation that resulted in the Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) being ruled to increase royalty payments to songwriters and music publishers from music streaming companies.
This was a hearing pitting songwriters and music publishers against five technology companies, including three of the largest companies in the world (Apple, Amazon and Google), which sought to reduce the already low rate of royalties that they pay to songwriters for the use of their music on their streaming services.

Federal Judge Asks Spotify: ‘How Many Songs Have You Infringed, Anyway?’

cyberplayground

COLUMBUS DAY TEACH HISTORY THROUGH SONG
In fourteen hundred ninety-two Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

Maurice Abravanel was a descendant of Don Isaac Abravanel, born in 1438, who, as finance minister to Queen Esabella of Spain, arranged funding for the first voyage of Christopher Columbus.

Repeat: “U can’t march off 2 war in 3/4” ~ Karen Ellis
MUSIC OF WAR RESOURCES, PATRIOTISM, PROPOGANDA AND PROTEST
First Nation Songs, Civil War, WW1, WW2, Military War music Patriotic, Protest and Union Songs
“President’s Day Activities! Learn the President’s song 
Classroom Music, The State Song: Educational CyberPlayGround
classroom music, teach your state song. Find all 50 state songs

 
 

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround K12 Newsletters May 1

May is celebrated as the Music Month:

MUSIC EDUCATION, CLASSROOM RESOURCES AND MUSIC LAW
IDEAS FOR CLASSROOM USE
THE HISTORY OF JAZZ
Question: Can You Guess who this is?
A Grandson of slaves, a boy was born in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans known as the “Back of Town.” His father abandoned the family when the child was an infant, His mother became a prostitute and the boy and his sister had to live with their grandmother. Early in life he proved to be gifted for music and with three other kids he sang in the streets of New Orleans. His first gains were the coins that were thrown to them. A Jewish family, Karnofsky, who had immigrated from Lithuania to the USA had pity for the 7-year-old boy and brought him into their home. Initially given ‘work’ in the house, to feed this hungry child. There he remained and slept in this Jewish families home where, for the first time in his life he was treated with kindness and tenderness. When he went to bed, Mrs. Karnovsky sang him a Russian Lullaby that he would sing with her. Later, he learned to sing and play several Russian and Jewish songs. Over time, this boy became the adopted son of this family. The Karnofskys gave him money to buy his first musical instrument; as was the custom in the Jewish families.
They sincerely admired his musical talent. Later, when he became a professional musician and composer, he used these Jewish melodies in compositions, such as St. James Infirmary and Go Down Moses. The little black boy grew up and wrote a book about this Jewish family who had adopted him in 1907.
In memory of this family and until the end of his life, he wore a star of David and said that in this family he had learned “how to live real life and determination.”
Answer: You might recognize his name. This little boy was called Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong. Louis Armstrong proudly spoke fluent Yiddish!
New Orleans-based Musicologist John Baron discusses Louis Armstrong’s relationship with the Karnofskys, a New Orleans Jewish family he worked for, and who helped him buy his first musical instrument. Interview by Neil W. Levin.

Have a Great American Thanksgiving and here's your Folkie Music Menu

Each year American Routes americanroutes.org celebrates Thanksgiving weekend with words and music from the National Heritage Fellows Concert in Washington DC. Since 1982 the National Endowment for the Arts has presented the fellowships. It’s America’s highest award in Folk & Traditional Arts. We’ll hear a mix of this year’s fellows live from the stage as well as great recordings of those from years gone by: The Holmes Brothers, Doc Watson, Tremé Brass Band, Michael Doucet with Beausoleil, Boozoo Chavis, Flaco Jimenez, Mavis Staples, Del McCoury, John Cephas & Phil Wiggins, Andy Statman and many more. Blues and jazz, Cajun and zydeco, Téjano and klezmer, bluegrass and gospel as well as Native American voices, make a cornucopia of sounds and stories for the holiday!
All from American Routes, the weekly public radio program devoted to the music and culture of New Orleans, the Gulf South and beyond. American Routes is produced with Tulane University’s School of Liberal Arts and distributed nationally by Public Radio Exchange.
This Week’s Playlist:
Hour 1
The Maryland and Delaware Singing and Praying Bands live performance live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Black Cat on the Line” (Cephas) Cephas and Wiggins From Richmond to Atlanta (Bullseye Blues)
“Big Black Train” (Johnson/Sherry) The Earls of Leicester The Earls of Leicester (Rounder)
“House of the Rising Sun” (Ray/Holmes) Doc & Richard Watson Third Generation Blues (Sugar Hill)
Instrumental: “Fiddler’s Dream/Whistling Rufus/Ragtime Annie” (Trad.) Doc Watson Foundation: The Doc Watson Guitar Instrumental Collection 1964-1998 (Sugar Hill)
Kevin Doyle on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Parlez-Nous A Boire (Speak to Us of Drinking)” (Trad.) Beausoleil Parlez-Nous A Boire & More (Arhoolie)
“Dog Hill” (Chavis/Simien) Boozoo Chavis Boozoo Chavis (Electra Nonesuch)
“Ay Te Dejo en San Antonio” (Jimenez) Flaco Jimenez Ay Te Dejo en San Antonio (Arhoolie)
Instrumental: “Viva Seguin” (Jimenez) Flaco Jimenez Arriba El Norte (Rounder)
“Descarga Cachao” (Lopez) Cachao Descarga Cachao (Epic)
Cowboy Donley live performance and on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Sing On” (Trad.) The Treme Brass Band New Orleans Music! (Mardi Gras)
End Bed: “Tipitina” (Byrd) Allen Toussaint American Routes original recording
Hour 2
Rufus White live performance and on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
Yvonne Walker Keshick on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“On the King’s Highway” (Statman) Andy Statman Old Brooklyn (Shefa)
Vera Nakonechny on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
Instrumental: “One in Nine” (Statman) Andy Statman Old Brooklyn (Shefa)
Henry Arquette on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“Loggin’ Man” (McCoury) The Del McCoury Band The Cold Hard Facts (Rounder)
“John Henry” (Trad.) John Jackson Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down (Arhoolie)
Caroline Mazloomi on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
“I’ll Take You There” (Isbell) The Staple Singers The Muscle Shoals Sound (Rhino)
Instrumental: “Opus de Soul” (Thomas/Isbell) Albert King, Steve Cropper, Pops Staples Jammed Together (Stax)
The Holmes Brothers live performance and on-stage interview live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014
End Bed: “Will the Circle Be Unbroken” (Carter) 2014 NEA Heritage Fellows live recording at NEA Heritage Concert 2014

Girls change the world and can do anything

Educational CyberPlayGround: Websites for Girls and Young Women who want to be involved with Technology
WEBSITES FOR GIRLS AND YOUNG WOMEN
How to help girls get into technology.
Real women engineers and other role models for girls.
Changing Girls’ Attitudes About Computers

“Don’t worry your pretty little head over it.”
Special Edition
Computer Wonder Women
National Women’s History Month
GIRLS WHO CODE: GIRLS CAN DO ANYTHING – GIRLS CAN CHANGE THE WORD
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr6b4nwo-5k

Reaching Inner City Youth through the Arts 2014

“TRANSFORMATIONAL!”
Professional Development
for K-16 and Community
Based Educators
Community Works Journal—Online Magazine for Educators
REGISTER TODAY, SPECIAL RATES Through June 15th  Curriculum Planning, Teaching Tools, and Inspiring Collaboration 2014 SUMMER INSTITUTES for K-16 EDUCATORS Place, Service-Learning, and Sustainable Communities Los Angeles and Vermont
City Hearts: Reaching Inner City Youth through the Arts 2014 SUMMER INSTITUTES for K-16 EDUCATORS Place, Service-Learning, and Sustainable Communities
 
“City Hearts: Kids Say Yes to the Arts” is an Arts enrichment program in the Los Angeles County area that was founded by Sherry and Bob Jason in 1984 and began offering classes in 1985. City Hearts hires teachers from Los Angeles’ Arts community to teach dance, acting, circus arts, musical theatre, Shakespeare, singing, crafts, and photography free to the community’s most impoverished children. The list of arts and artists continues to grow, connecting thousands of underprivileged students with professionals to inspire learning and integrate disaffected youth back into the community through the Arts. The following is a recent interview with founder Sherry Jason.
snip
The Arts Should Be for Everyone
“I began teaching ballet at the age of eleven in my garage, charging 50 cents a class. Even then there was a family—the father was a schoolteacher, and the mother worked in Bob’s Big Boy as a car hop. They had three kids, and ballet lessons for their two girls would have cost their lunch money. Right then and there I decided that art should be provided to every child, regardless of their ability to pay. I waived their fee.”
snip
 
SUGGESTED RESOURCES  For further reading about the importance of the arts in brain development and interconnections between the arts and learning, see the following resources. –eds.
 

The Calypsonians of Panama

The Calypsonians of Panama

The Hot Cool of Panamanian Calypso
 
Leslie George
Ethnomusicology professor Leslie George founded Grupo Amistad in 1990 with four members, which later ballooned to eight, featuring a guitar, bass, conga drum, ukulele and saxophones.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yuzaA-cW2Pw]
 

Los Beachers de Panama

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkuuLzS_B-Q]

Truisms by Bob Lefsetz

Educational CyberPlayGround loves and highlights Bob !! Subscribe to his newsletter.
Truisms
by Bob Lefsetz – March 1st, 2014, 3:00pm
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/index.php/archives/2014/02/27/truisms
subscribe
http://www.lefsetz.com/lists/?p=subscribe&id=1
Tumblr is for porn.
Facebook is for the wannabe famous.
Instagram is for those who are too lazy to write.
Texting is social currency. It doesn’t matter how many likes or friends or followers you’ve got, but how many people text you and how regularly, that’s how popularity is judged today.
Pinterest is inexplicable to guys.
Samsung is for those who hate Apple and those too cheap to buy an iPhone (not necessarily the same thing, Apple-haters will buy the most expensive Galaxy).
iPhone 4s means you’re almost at the end of your contract or you’re too cheap to upgrade.
Tesla means you’re more interested in status than utility, or you never drive far from home.
iPhone 5c means you think iPhones really cost a hundred bucks, not north of five hundred.
Windows means you got your computer from work or you’re too cheap to buy a Mac. Argue all you want, perception is everything, and perception is reality.
Hip-hop is the rock and roll of the Millennials. With a dollop of Gen-X’ers thrown in.
Rock and roll is the music of the baby boomers, who believe everything they’re into should last forever, but it doesn’t, just like them.
Books get a lot of publicity, but barely sell. Sure, there are exceptions, but very few.
Sales are irrelevant, streams are everything, but newspapers are only trumpeting Spotify plays when all the action’s on YouTube.
Albums are for the creators, no one else cares, except for a cadre of extremely vocal fans.
Terrestrial radio is an advertiser-laden medium for poor people. Anybody with an income is listening to satellite or streaming from their mobile device.
Baby boomers buy Japanese automobiles because they remember how bad their parents’ Detroit iron was. In other words, despite all the press that GM, Ford and Chrysler are improving, boomers are sticking to Toyota and Honda, at least in California, and trends still start in California, don’t ever forget it.
Binge viewing is a badge of honor. Telling everybody you stayed home to watch all the episodes of _______ garners more status than saying you went to the show, and there’s more to talk about!
The Millennials want to be famous, just watch Douglas Rushkoff’s documentary “Generation Like“.
Newspapers insist on fat profit margins and head for decrepitude while online sites focus on user experience first and profits last. In other words, it’s the product, stupid!
Companies are constantly fighting for awareness.
Ignorance reigns. Education comes through word of mouth, which also spreads falsehoods. He who knows the most truth wins. We live in an information society, what’s in your brain is paramount.
Without relationships you cannot succeed.
Here today, gone tomorrow, welcome to the twenty first century. You can only combat this by constantly producing. U2 released a single during the Super Bowl, it’s already been forgotten, assuming you knew its name to begin with.
No one cares if Shia LaBeouf wears a bag on his head, it’s a trumped up media story.
Robin Thicke will screw everything that moves, wake up and realize his career is over and lament the loss of his wife.
Alec Baldwin was right about Harvey Levin, but if you think he’s retiring from public life, you believe Kim Kardashian is all natural. That’s what Alec does, turn it on in the public eye, without this oxygen he’s dead, so he’ll be back, just like Scott Shannon, ha! (“Alec Baldwin: Good-bye, Public Life“)
Just because you get press for your celebrity cook/lifestyle book, don’t think we care, you’re just another loser like us. In other words, just because you promote it, that does not mean it will sell.
Bitcoin may not be forever, but digital currency is.
Marc Andreesen is a borderline blowhard who is pontificating on tech better than most, pay attention to what he says.
You know Twitter is in crisis when regular tweeters like Michael Moore don’t.
Apple is not going to revolutionize television. Content owners won’t let them.
Manhattan is losing steam as an arts center, it’s just too expensive to live there. In other words, bankers can prop up institutions, but they cannot drive them forward.
Millennials are not mad that technologists are crowding them out of San Francisco as much as they are that they too are not rich.
Bill Gates cannot save Microsoft. Samsung is a better me-too company. Vision is everything today.
Amazon, Apple, Google, Facebook. They control the world, consolidation has taken hold, it’s the next hot topic and you don’t know it yet.
People give up when no one’s paying attention, whether it be music, MySpace, Facebook, Twitter… Like hula-hoops, they’re fads, interesting for a while, then abandoned.
Just because something makes money, that does not mean it does not suck.
 
<more>