Be A Flu Fighter!

Be A Flu Fighter! Protect Yourself and Others

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/partners/flu-fighters.htm

Call the CDC 800-232-4636

Every year people around the world work to study, track, and prevent flu. This page profiles some of these flu fighters and the work they are doing to contribute to flu prevention in the U.S. and around the world!

The National Influenza Prevention and Vaccination Campaign aims to increase flu vaccination rates among all people 6 months of age and older across the United States, with a special focus on health care professionals and those populations at high risk of flu complications including pregnant women, people with chronic diseases, seniors, and young children.

It's National Influenza Vaccination Week (NIVW)! Did you know that flu season can begin as early as October, it usually peaks between December and February, and it can last as late as May? As long as flu virsues are spreading, it's not too late to get a flu vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones through fall, winter and into spring. #GetAFluVax

Join the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and campaign partners in promoting vaccination messages using various digital platforms and partner resources.

For more involved partnership request, email fluinbox@cdc.gov

It’s Not Too Late!

It’s that time of year again — flu season. As family and friends are gathering for the holidays, flu activity is increasing. Get a flu vaccine now if you have not gotten vaccinated yet this season.

There are many reasons to get a flu vaccine. Flu vaccination can reduce your risk of flu illness, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu. Even if you are vaccinated and still get sick, flu vaccine can reduce the severity of your illness. Flu vaccination also can help protect women during and after pregnancy and protect the baby born to a vaccinated mom for several months after birth. Flu vaccine also has been shown to save children’s lives, prevent serious events associated with chronic lung disease, diabetes and heart disease, and prevent flu-related hospitalization among working age adults and older adults. Getting vaccinated isn’t just about keeping you healthy; it’s also about helping to protect others around you who may be vulnerable to becoming very sick, such as babies, older adults, and pregnant women.

It’s not too late to get a flu vaccine to protect yourself and your loved ones this flu season! Find a place near you to get a flu vaccine with the

HealthMap Vaccine Finder  https://vaccinefinder.org/

On Estonia’s Isle of Women a Colorful Folkloric Way of Life Survives

On Estonia’s Isle of Women a Colorful Folkloric Way of Life Survives

Welcome to Estonia’s Isle of Women
What would life be like without men? On this tiny Baltic island, it’s business as usual. But its colorful, folkloric way of life is threatened by a dwindling population.


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/02/travel/kihnu-estonia-women-unesco-folk-culture-tourism.html

‘Sound Portraits From Bulgaria: A Journey To A Vanished World’

Martin Koenig: “Sound Portraits from Bulgaria and the Balkans: Photographs and Recordings”

Princeton Library
Wednesday, October 23, 6:30 pm
8:30 pm
65 Witherspoon Street
Princeton, NJ 08542 United States
Phone:609-924-9529
https://princetonlibrary.org/event/martin-koenig-sound-portraits-from-bulgaria-and-the-balkans-photographs-and-recordings/

Smithsonian Folkways Presents  ‘Sound Portraits From Bulgaria: A Journey To A Vanished World’ (Out Nov. 1)

Martin Koenig arrived in Bulgaria in 1966 at age 27 with letters of recommendation from fellow recordist Alan Lomax and anthropologist Margaret Mead, an educator and cultural documentarian determined to study the folk dances of rural communities throughout the country. As he travelled, absorbing the culture and speaking with the people he encountered, Koenig became captivated by the earthy and ancient, yet very much alive, music he heard all around him. He recorded the music he was exposed to, and took photographs of not only dancers, but the village singers and musicians as well as those going about their daily lives around these hotbeds of creative expression. Enraptured with the people of Bulgaria, their way of life and the art they made, he returned several times between 1966 and ‘79, documenting everything he could.
Press Release

Sound Portraits from Bulgaria: A Journey to a Vanished World
Thursday, October 17, 2019, 6 p.m.

Program Locations:
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center, Bruno Walter Auditorium
https://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2019/10/17/sound-portraits-bulgaria-journey-vanished-world

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Free – Online Reservation required

For over two decades, starting in the mid-1960s, ethnographer and Balkan dance specialist, Martin Koenig researched and documented traditional Bulgarian music and dance forms in their original settings. To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, Koenig comes to the Library to reveal a forgotten and vanishing culture with archival photographs and audio.

Reserve your general admission seat HERE starting  September 17th, 2019.

Free General Admission Ticket
FM assistive listening devices available upon request with one week minimum advance notice.
Call 212-340-0918 or 212-340-0951 to request these devices.
ASL interpretation and real-time (CART) captioning available upon request. Please submit your request at least two weeks in advance by emailing accessibility@nypl.org.

more on Traditional Dance

Roots of Folkdance
Hoedowns are the roots of southern square dancing. Jamison
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Arts/Dance.html

Roots of Folkdance
other world cultures. ROOTS OF MODERN DANCE Performing Arts Dance
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Arts/Traditional_Arts.html

Educational CyberPlayGround: TRAUDE SCHRATTENECKER and Karen Ellis Biographical…
Toronto starting in 1970. Dance creates and develops rhythmical
https://edu-cyberpg.com/AboutUs/bioTraude.html

Educational CyberPlayGround: Motivating children towards music by Greta Pedersen
in the marching band and dance band music of the day, which was
https://edu-cyberpg.com/Music/History_Of_Jazz.html

ECP: Linguistics – Why are some languages spoken faster than others?

ECP – Linguistics

https://edu-cyberpg.com/Linguistics/

Educational CyberPlayGround provides Linguistic information and resources for learning about languages like Creole, Irish American Vernacular, Black English, AAVE African American Vernacular,
Creole Dialect Speakers, ESL, Ebonics, and Pidgin.
Promote and improve the teaching and learning of languages, identify and solve problems related to language and culture, and serve as a resource for information about language and culture.

6/25/16 KE ~ “Language like Music is a Virus and it can infect broad swaths of the public rapidly.” If there’s no virality, if it’s not spreading, it’s not happening.

Language is the most massive and inclusive art we know, a mountainous and anonymous work of unconscious generations.” ~ Edward Sapir

“There are nine different words for the color blue in the Spanish Maya dictionary,” writes Earl Shorris, “but just three Spanish translations, leaving six [blue] butterflies that can be seen only by the Maya, proving that when a language dies six butterflies disappear from the consciousness of the earth.”

Why are some languages spoken faster than others?
New research suggests that different tongues, regardless of speed, transmit information at roughly the same rate
Sep 28 2019
<https://www.economist.com/graphic-detail/2019/09/28/why-are-some-languages-spoken-faster-than-others>

WERE THIS article written in Japanese, it would be longer. A Thai translation, meanwhile, would be shorter. And yet those reading it aloud, in either language or in its original English, would finish at roughly the same time. This peculiar phenomenon is the subject of new research which finds that languages face a trade-off between complexity and speed. Those packed with information are spoken slower, while simpler ones are spoken faster. As a result, most languages are equally efficient at conveying information.

In a study published this month in Science Advances, Christophe Coupé, Yoon Mi Oh, Dan Dediu and François Pellegrino start by quantifying the information density of 17 Eurasian languages, as measured by the ease with which each syllable can be guessed based on the preceding one. Next, they record the rate at which 170 native speakers read 15 texts out loud. Finally, armed with data about the information contained in a piece of text and the speed at which it can be spoken, the authors derive the rate at which information is communicated.

The results suggest that there is an optimal range of speeds within which the brain can process information most efficiently. Speakers of simple languages pick up the pace to keep conversations brief. Speakers of complex languages exert more effort planning sentences and articulating syllables, causing discussions to drag on. Yet in both cases, information is conveyed at about the same pace. “It is like bird wings,” says Dr Coupé, one of the authors, “you may have big ones that need few beats per second or you have to really flap the little ones you got, but the result is pretty much the same in terms of flying.”

[snip]