Bezos is the most disgusting and dirtiest person on earth!

Jeff Bezos
richest man
in America
with his 157 Billion

feels free to
Destroy the Earth

BEZOS admits that limitless growth—the growth that made him the richest man in the world—is incompatible with a habitable earth.

But instead of announcing investments in renewable energy or public infrastructure, Bezos pitches an escape from earth.

HE WANTS TO THROW YOU OFF THE EARTH – HE AND HIS MONEY GETS TO STAY.

His whole focus towards the reality of capitalism, climate change, and the intractable connections between those two things is to make more money by planning the great escape from earth !!!!!

He’s wrong.

Jeff Bezos Is a Post-Earth Capitalist

Bezos admits that the limitless growth that made him the world’s richest man is incompatible with a habitable Earth.

Bezos argues that a capitalist logic of endless growth is the way to save the Earth from poverty, homelessness, and environmental catastrophe. (Bezos does not say “climate change” or “global warming” but “pollution.”) However, capitalism is an economic system that is inextricably tied with colonial history, enslaving people and exploiting laborers, and extracting and stripping as much away from the Earth as possible in order to fuel growth. Capitalism is not the solution to the problems that Bezos describes. It’s the root of the problem.

Bezos Who Sent 20 Dic Pics To His Mistress Is Going To Conquer Space? LOL!

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/3k3kwb/jeff-bezos-is-a-post-earth-capitalist

The richest boys merely engage in their space toy pissing contest instead of saving the planet! Aholes.

NASA Education News

New This Week!
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA Kentucky EPSCoR Research Area 2015-2016 Request for Proposals
Audience: Higher Education Institutions in Kentucky
Optional Pre-Proposal Teleconference: Sept. 3, 2015, at 4 p.m. EDT
Required Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 9, 2015
Send Your Name to Mars on NASA’s Next Red Planet Mission!
Audience: Educators and Students Worldwide
Deadline: Sept. 8, 2015
Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Sept. 8, 2015, at 6 p.m. EDT
Undergraduate Student Instrument Project — 2015 Flight Research Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Optional Pre-Proposal Teleconference: Sept. 10, 2015, at 2 p.m. EDT
Required Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 1, 2015
NASA’s Digital Learning Network Series — International Observe the Moon Night
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Sept. 14-18, 2015
NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat With The Martian Author Andy Weir and NASA Experts
Audience: Grades 8-12, Higher Education and Informal Education
Event Date: Sept. 17, 2015, 1-2 p.m. EDT
NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium 2015-2016 Request for Proposals
Audience: NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium Affiliate Institutions
Application Deadline: Oct. 8, 2015
NASA Kentucky EPSCoR 2015-2016 Request for Proposals

Audience: Higher Education Institutions in Kentucky
Application Deadline: Oct. 15, 2015
Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2016-2017 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 19, 2015, at 8 p.m. EST
2016 CubeSat Launch Initiative Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 24, 2015
Army Educational Outreach Program’s eCYBERMISSION Competition
Audience: Students in Grades 6-9
Registration Deadline: Dec. 17, 2015
U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 9-12
Registration Open: Sept. 30, 2015 to Feb. 4, 2016
Infographic Submission Deadline: March 4, 2016

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Louisiana Tech University Online Course — Steps to STEM: NASA Education Resources for STEM Engagement
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-9
Application Deadline: Sept. 4, 2015
National Climate Game Jam
Audience: All Educators and Students
Local Site Sign-Up Deadline: Sept. 4, 2015
Date: Aug. Oct. 2-4, 2015
“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest
Audience: All Educators and Students
Deadline: Ongoing Through March 2016
#WhySpaceMatters Photography Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Deadline: Sept. 10, 2015
2015 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Next Lecture Date: Sept. 10, 2015, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Sept. 12, 2015
Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: Sept. 12, 2015, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT
MAVEN Workshops — ‘Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!’
Audience: Elementary Educators
Colorado Springs Workshop Date: Sept. 12, 2015
Portland Workshop Date: Sept. 19, 2015
Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates Professional Development Program
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Sept. 14, 2015
Cast Your Vote in the Ceres “Bright Spot” Mystery Poll
Audience: All Educators and Students
Second Annual NASA HBCUs/MSIs Partnerships Meeting
Audience: Representatives from Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Serving Institutions
Event Date: Sept. 16, 2015
International Observe the Moon Night
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 19, 2015
Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations
Available While Supplies Last
2016 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 23, 2015
Entry Deadline: Oct. 3, 2015
Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops — Fall/Winter 2015-16
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Event Date: September 26-27, 2015
Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix A
Audience: Graduate Students and Established Researchers
Proposal Deadline: Sept. 30, 2015
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html
Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?
Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NEW THIS WEEK!
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA Kentucky EPSCoR Research Area 2015-2016 Request for Proposals
The NASA Kentucky EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) program is seeking proposals to establish research activities that will make significant contributions to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of NASA’s mission directorates. The research activities should also contribute to the overall research infrastructure, science and technology capabilities, higher education, and economic development of Kentucky.
The NASA Kentucky EPSCoR programs strengthen research capability in the state in areas of importance to NASA and Kentucky by promoting development of research infrastructure, improving capabilities to gain support outside of EPSCoR, and developing partnerships with NASA.
Interested institutions must submit a Notice of Intent by email by 11:59 p.m. EDT, Sept. 9, 2015. Pre-proposals are due on Oct. 22, 2015. Pre-proposals will be accepted from institutions of higher education in Kentucky.
For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://nasa.engr.uky.edu/files/2015/08/RFP-16-003.pdf or the NASA Kentucky website at http://nasa.engr.uky.edu.
An optional teleconference for those interested in submitting proposals will take place on Sept. 3, 2015, at 4 p.m. EDT. Visit the link above for details.
Please direct questions about this request to Jacob Owen at Jacob.Owen@uky.edu.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Send Your Name to Mars on NASA’s Next Red Planet Mission!
Mars enthusiasts around the world can participate in NASA’s journey to Mars by adding their names to a silicon microchip headed to the Red Planet aboard NASA’s InSight Mars lander! InSight will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California in March 2016 and land on Mars on Sept. 28, 2016.
The mission is the first dedicated to investigating the planet’s deep interior. InSight will place the first seismometer directly on the surface of Mars to measure Martian quakes and use seismic waves to learn about the planet’s interior. The lander also will deploy a self-hammering heat probe that will burrow deeper into the ground than any device on the Red Planet has done previously. These and other InSight investigations will improve our understanding about the formation and evolution of all rocky planets, including Earth.
Submissions will be accepted until Sept. 8, 2015. To send your name to Mars aboard InSight, go to http://go.usa.gov/3Aj3G.
To learn more about the InSight mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/insight/main/index.html.
Direct questions about this opportunity to http://mars.nasa.gov/feedback/.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. Simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description to register.
NASA Elementary STEM Inquiry: Experiencing Water Exploration
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-6
Event Date: Sept. 8, 2015, at 6 p.m. EDT
NASA collaborates with GLOBE to introduce water in a hands-on STEM inquiry-based experience. Learn how NASA missions collect data about the water cycle. Explore the Elementary GLOBE resources including teacher guides, storybooks and related STEM activities designed for grades K-5. The activities promote problem solving, communication skills and teamwork while engaging the students in learning that is both fun and relevant to their everyday lives. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/139045
Mission to Mars Series: Curiosity, On Target!
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: Sept. 9, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) Mission and training in an engineering design activity from the On the Moon educator guide, which has been modified to model the Curiosity landing parameters. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standard ETS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/137602
Mission to Mars Series: Engineering Our Way to Mars
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Sept. 10, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a NASA engineer? In this online presentation, learn how to design and build an airbag system that will safely land a payload on Mars. Science concepts covered will be force, potential, and kinetic and mechanical energy. The activity also meets Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Math Standards. Register online to participate.https://www.etouches.com/138909
Mission to Mars Series: Comparing Earth and Mars
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Sept 14, 2015, at 6 p.m. EDT
NASA’s Mars and Earth educator guide offers educators nine activities focusing on the geologic features and models of the two planets. The lessons are perfect for educators looking for short, focused activities using engineering design and science. Important Problem Based Learning strategies will be implemented. The webinar will focus on three important questions: How do we make a model? Why do NASA engineers and scientists use models? What are the important characteristics of a model?
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/133768
Art and the Cosmic Connection
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-16
Event Date: Sept. 15, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Geology meets art! Let your inner geologist use art to recreate craters, mountains, rivers, windswept landscapes and more. Learn to read planetary images as well as Earth images. Activities meet Next Generation Science Standards for Earth’s Place in the Universe, Earth Systems and Social Studies integrations.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/137336

Using NASA to Teach About Gravity

Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Sept. 16, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of resources for teaching concepts of gravity and microgravity to students in grades 5-8. Discussion will include modifications of activities and accommodations. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards PS2 and PS3.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/138134
Rockets 2 Racecars: Session 1 — Train Like an Astronaut
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-9
Event Date: Sept. 17, 2015, at 4 p.m. EDT
Get your students revved up with NASA’s Rockets 2 Racecars STEM education webinar series! Educators will discover correlations between stock car drivers and astronauts that include muscle strength and endurance, reaction time, and effects to your brain when exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide. There is a special opportunity for 12 educators to work alongside NASA specialists during an event at the Dover Speedway on the weekend of Oct. 2, 2015.
Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/138932
For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.
Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Undergraduate Student Instrument Project — 2015 Flight Research Opportunity
NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, in collaboration with the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program, is seeking proposals from U.S. institutions of higher education for the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project’s Student Flight Research Opportunity. Proposals should outline plans to develop an undergraduate-led project team that will fly a science and/or technology payload relevant to NASA’s strategic goals and objectives on a sounding rocket, balloon, aircraft, suborbital reusable launch vehicle or CubeSat launched on an orbital launch vehicle.
Funding is available to all U.S. institutions of higher education (e.g., universities, four-year colleges, community colleges, or two-year institutions) and to institutions involved in the Space Grant program. Prospective project teams can be composed only of undergraduate students from U.S. institutions of higher education. Graduate students are not eligible to be project team members; however, they are encouraged to serve as mentors to the undergraduate student team and are permitted to request a mentoring stipend.
Interested institutions must submit a Notice of Intent by email by 11:59 p.m. EDT, Oct. 1, 2015. Proposals are due on Nov. 20, 2015.
For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1WR586S .
An optional teleconference for those interested in submitting proposals will take place on Sept. 10, 2015, at 2 p.m. EDT. Visit the link above for details.
Please direct questions about this request to David Pierce at david.l.pierce@nasa.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Series — International Observe the Moon Night
NASA’s Digital Learning Network at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is presenting a series of educational videoconferences in support of International Observe the Moon Night. The six videoconferences will take place Sept. 14-18, 2015.
The videoconferences will cover topics from the DLN classroom module “The Moon,” resources found on the International Observe the Moon website, and interviews with NASA scientists working at Marshall. Schools must register to participate in the videoconferences.
In addition, a webcast will take place on Sept. 18, 2015. It will be open to all schools interested in tuning in.
For details about this series of events, please visit the DLN Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/NASADLN.
Please direct questions about this series of events to Scott Anderson at scott.c.anderson@nasa.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat With The Martian Author Andy Weir and NASA Experts
As NASA prepares for humans’ first steps on Mars in the 2030s, it becomes critical to understand what is needed for people to survive and thrive on Mars. On Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, NASA’s Johnson Space Center will connect with NASA’s Ames Research Center to discuss Surviving and Thriving on Mars.
Join the discussion by asking questions through NASA’s Digital Learning Network of The Martian author Andy Weir, planetary scientist Chris McKay and astronaut Ricky Arnold. A representative from NASA will moderate questions during the program.
Submit questions via Twitter using #AskNASA or via email starting Sept. 10, 2015, to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.
The hourlong event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Sept. 17, 2015, at 1 p.m. EDT.
For more information, visit http://dln.nasa.gov.
Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium 2015-2016 Request for Proposals
The NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium is seeking proposals for programs supporting STEM areas that are of interest to NASA and Kentucky. Space Grant promotes networking and cooperation among education, industry, and local, state and federal government. Space Grant also focuses on the recruitment and training of U.S. citizens, especially women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities, for careers in aerospace science and technology.
Space Grant Consortium programs support faculty, students and outreach through graduate fellowships, undergraduate fellowships, team fellowships, research initiation and mini-grant awards.
Proposals will be accepted from NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium Affiliate Institutions. A list of these affiliate institutions may be found at http://nasa.engr.uky.edu/space-grant.
Applications are due Oct. 8, 2015.
For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://nasa.engr.uky.edu/files/2015/08/RFP-16-001.pdf.
Please direct questions about this request to Jacob Owen at Jacob.Owen@uky.edu.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA Kentucky EPSCoR 2015-2016 Request for Proposals
The NASA Kentucky EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research) programs strengthen research capability in the state in areas of importance to NASA and Kentucky by promoting development of research infrastructure, improving capabilities to gain support outside EPSCoR, and developing partnerships with NASA.
Proposals will be accepted from institutions of higher education in Kentucky for Research Infrastructure Development Grants, or RIDG, with a funding level of $50,000 and for Workshop/Conference/Seminar, or WCS, Awards with funding levels of up to $3,000.
Applications are due Oct. 15, 2015.
For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://nasa.engr.uky.edu/files/2015/08/RFP-16-002.pdf or the NASA Kentucky website at http://nasa.engr.uky.edu.
Please direct questions about this request to Jacob Owen at Jacob.Owen@uky.edu.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2016-2017 Fellowship Year
The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office and bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.
To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.
Current sponsoring agencies include NASA, the Department of Energy, and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.
The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science’s Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and other partners.
Program applications are due Nov. 19, 2015, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.
Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.
Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2016 CubeSat Launch Initiative Opportunity
NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts that can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.
The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. The initiative also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.
Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 24, 2015. NASA plans to select the payloads by Feb. 19, 2016, but selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Selected experiments will fly as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2016 and running through 2019. NASA does not provide funding for the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and accredited educational organizations.
For additional information about this opportunity and NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-opens-new-cubesat-opportunities-for-low-cost-space-exploration andhttp://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/home/CubeSats_initiative.html.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Army Educational Outreach Program’s eCYBERMISSION Competition
Registration is open for the Army Educational Outreach Program’s new eCYBERMISSION competition. This Web-based competition, free to students in grades 6–9, challenges teams to compete for state, regional and national awards while working to solve real problems in their community. Teams compete for awards up to $9,000 in U.S. savings bonds.
Registration for student teams is open until Dec. 17, 2015. Teams have until Feb. 25, 2016, to submit their science project, commonly referred to as the Mission Folder — the official write-up of their project. During this period, eCYBERMISSION provides a wealth of online resources for student teams and team advisors to assist with project completion. Included in available online resources are eCYBERMISSION CyberGuide Live Chats, which allow teams to ask questions about their projects virtually to volunteer STEM experts who answer in real-time.
Registration is also open to professionals who are interested in participating as volunteers — Virtual Judges, Ambassadors, and/or CyberGuides — to help build students’ interest in STEM.
For more information, visit http://www.ecybermission.com/.
Please direct questions about this competition to missioncontrol@eCYBERMISSION.com.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge
Registration opens soon for the U.S. Department of Energy’s new BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This competition challenges teams of high school students to design an infographic that responds to one of four specific cross-curricular bioenergy topics.
Selected infographics will be promoted nationally on the challenge website and via social media. One team of students will be selected to present their infographic at the Bioenergy Technologies Office’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.
To make the challenge easy and effective, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Library of Congress have provided a resource guide with steps for doing research, along with valuable links and references to help students learn about bioenergy topics. Participants also have access to rubrics and guides for creating infographics and designing social media campaigns. Students can participate in this interdisciplinary STEM-focused challenge through classroom learning or informal education programs.
Registration for student teams is open from Sept. 30, 2015 to Feb. 4, 2016, and teams have until March 4, 2016, to submit their infographics.
For more information, visit http://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge.
Please direct questions about this challenge to BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Louisiana Tech University Online Course — Steps to STEM: NASA Education Resources for STEM Engagement
Louisiana Tech University is teaming up with NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center to offer a 10-week course for educators interested in putting a space-themed twist on learning. The course is a self-paced, online professional development experience focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education resources available from NASA. These resources have application methods for grades 4-9 with the goal of advancing high-quality STEM education using NASA’s unique capabilities.
Applications are due Sept. 4, 2015.
For more information and to enroll in the course, visithttp://education.latech.edu/departments/science_technology_education_center/opeo.php.
Please direct requests for a course syllabus and additional information to Amy McDowell at amy.mcdowell@nasa.gov.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Climate Game Jam

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is announcing a national climate game jam that will be held in multiple sites around the U.S. on Oct. 2-4, 2015. This event offers a unique opportunity for educators, students, scientists, game designers and interested members of the public to work together on the development of climate game jam prototypes that span a range of platforms, topics and audiences.
In December 2014, the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy launched a Climate Education and Literacy Initiative to help connect U.S students and citizens with the best available science-based information about climate change. Federal and nongovernmental experts are collaborating to harness the promise of educational games and interactive media to enhance understanding and awareness of climate change impacts and solutions.
The Climate Game Jam will encourage the creation of new game prototypes that allow players to learn about climate change and resilience through science-based interactive experience. Promising prototypes will be made available for teachers and students to use in the classroom and for lifelong learners to use in science centers or at home. Selected prototypes may be highlighted at a climate game showcase in December 2015.
At the present time, NOAA is recruiting host sites for the game jam around the country. Each site can establish limits to hours and audience. More information about the responsibilities of a site can be found at http://climategamejam.org. A kick-off event featuring Ken Eklund, a well-known game designer, will take place via webcast on Friday, Oct. 2, 2015.
For more information, visit http://climategamejam.org.
If you are interested in hosting a local site, please sign up at http://tinyurl.com/climategamejam by Sept. 4, 2015.
Please direct questions about this event to Peg Steffen at Peg.Steffen@noaa.gov.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“Where Over the World Is Astronaut Scott Kelly?” Geography From Space Trivia Contest
During his year-long stay on the International Space Station, astronaut Scott Kelly wants to test your knowledge of the world through a geography trivia game on Twitter. Traveling more than 220 miles above Earth, and at 17,500 miles per hour, he circumnavigates the globe more than a dozen times a day. This gives Kelly the opportunity to see and photograph various geographical locations on Earth. In fact, part of his job while in space is to capture images of Earth for scientific observations.
Follow @StationCDRKelly on Twitter. Each Wednesday, Kelly will tweet a picture and ask the public to identify the place depicted in the photo. The first person to identify the place correctly will win an autographed copy of the picture. Kelly plans to continue posting weekly contest photos until he returns from the space station in March 2016.
For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/feature/where-over-the-world-is-astronaut-scott-kelly.
To learn more about the One-Year Mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/one-year-crew.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

#WhySpaceMatters Photography Competition
NASA and the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs, or UNOOSA, have launched a global photography competition to highlight how the vantage point of space helps us better understand our home planet, improve lives, and safeguard our future by aiding sustainable development on Earth.
To highlight the role of space-based science and technologies and their applications on Earth, NASA and UNOOSA are inviting the public to submit photos depicting why space matters to us all in our daily lives. To participate, post a picture and description on Instagram using the hashtag #whyspacematters and tagging @UNOOSA.
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, who is three months into a one-year mission aboard the International Space Station, will announce the winning photo each month by posting it from his Instagram account @StationCDRKelly.
For more information about the competition, visit http://www.unoosa.org/oosa/contests/whyspacematters/index.html.
For more information about the International Space Station and the One-Year Mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/one-year-crew.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2015 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, share the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.
Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are also streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.
The next lecture in the series is:
The Birth of Planets Around the Sun and Other Stars
Event Date:
Sept. 10 and Sept. 11, 2015, at 7 pm. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2015&month=9
With thousands of planets now known around other stars, it’s natural to wonder why so many planetary systems are quite different from our own. Join Dr. Neal Turner for a discussion about new images shedding light on the diversity of planet systems and a few of the 3-D computer models astronomers are using to try to learn how planets are born into such diversity.
For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visithttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.
Questions about this series should be directed to the http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Free Tours of Facilities at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is offering tours that take visitors behind the scenes and inside certain research facilities. Glenn scientists and engineers serve as guides. Tours will be offered each month through October 2015. Tours are free of charge for groups and individuals on an advance reservation basis. Visitor parking is also available free of charge.
A tour bus departs from Glenn’s main gate every hour beginning at 10 a.m. The last tour departs at 1 p.m. Each tour lasts about 45 minutes and is followed by a stop at Glenn’s Gift Shop.
Glenn’s 2015 Tour Schedule

Sept. 12, 2015 — Go to the Extreme: Join us on a tour through Glenn’s Extreme Environments Rig, or GEER. As NASA ventures through the solar system and beyond, spacecraft will experience hostile environments of Venus and other planetary bodies. Temperatures can reach hundreds of degrees. Air pressure is crushing, and the toxic atmosphere is thick. GEER is designed to simulate those temperatures and pressure extremes and accurately reproduce the atmospheric compositions of bodies in the solar system. GEER is currently in its commissioning phase for operations simulating Venus’ surface temperature, pressure and chemistry.
Oct. 3, 2015 — Explore Locomotion on Planets: Come explore the Simulated Lunar Operations facility, which is home to a 60-foot-long, 20-foot-wide sandpit filled with simulated lunar soil and a lunar rover test bed. Other areas simulate Martian soil conditions. Research in this facility will help NASA develop the components of rovers capable of traveling long distances and investigating planetary surfaces during future human and robotic missions to keep NASA’s journey to Mars moving forward.
Tours are open to U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents. To guarantee admission, reservations are required. For more information on tours and how to make reservations, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/events/tours.html.
Questions about the tours should be directed to Sheila Reese at sheila.d.reese@nasa.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum

The National Air and Space Museum’s Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.
Women in Aviation and Space
Sept. 12, 2015, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

From the days of the earliest pilots to today’s space program, women have made significant contributions in aviation and space. During this event, visitors will have the opportunity celebrate these incredible contributions by meeting female role models and learning about the women who inspired them.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/detail.cfm?id=17545
Hispanic Heritage Month: Innovators in Aviation and Space
Oct. 3, 2015, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EDT
National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

Celebrate the contributions of Latinos to aviation and space exploration during this Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day event. Meet Hispanic scientists and engineers — including a NASA astronaut — and participate in bilingual activities.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/detail.cfm?id=17546

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-2214.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MAVEN Workshops — ‘Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!’
The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission began orbiting Mars on Sept. 21, 2014. MAVEN will explore the planet′s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. The mission will provide invaluable insights into the history of Mars′ atmosphere, climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.
Join the MAVEN education team for a one-day workshop on the MAVEN mission and the accompanying elementary program, “Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!” This program features six standards-based lessons that combine science, literacy and art to help students understand planetary habitability and the MAVEN mission. The workshop will introduce participants to these lessons and concepts. The workshop will have a session devoted to Spanish-speaking English Language Learner and English as a Second Language students. Attendees will receive free classroom materials.
This workshop will be offered twice this fall! The first will take place at the Space Foundation Discovery Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on Sept. 12, 2015. The second will be held at the World Forestry Center Museum in Portland, Oregon, on Sept. 19, 2015.
Registration is $15 and includes a continental breakfast and lunch. Participants may bring one guest for no additional charge. Space is limited, so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.
For more information about the workshops and to apply online, visit http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/red-planet/.
Please email any questions about this opportunity to epomail@lasp.colorado.edu.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates Professional Development Program
The Institute for Broadening Participation is accepting applications for the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Geosciences Research Experiences for Undergraduates (MS PHD’S-GEO REU) Professional Development Program.
The MS PHD’S-GEO REU program is designed specifically for underrepresented minority undergraduates who have participated in a recent National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates, or NSF REU, program in one of the following disciplines: Earth sciences, ocean sciences, polar sciences, or atmospheric and geospace sciences. Consideration also will be given to applicants who have completed REUs in other STEM fields (e.g., environmental engineering, ecology, computational mathematics, etc.) and who demonstrate strong interest in the geosciences and articulate potential benefits received as participants in this program.
For Phase I of the program, participants will attend the December 2015 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. During the AGU Fall Meeting, participants will engage in virtual and on-site professional development, and participate in networking, community building and mentoring activities. Financial support to attend the AGU Fall Meeting will be provided.
During Phase II of the program, participants engage in additional virtual and face-to-face activities designed to provide insight and information into geosciences professions and opportunities; promote ongoing engagement with geoscience professionals; and facilitate additional mentoring, professional development and networking opportunities at discipline-specific conferences and meetings.
Applications are due Sept. 14, 2015. For more information and to fill out an application, visit http://www.msphds.org/GEOREU.aspx.
Please direct questions about this opportunity to pdp@msphds.org.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Cast Your Vote in the Ceres “Bright Spot” Mystery Poll
On March 6, 2015, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft began orbiting Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even before the spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet, images revealed mysterious bright spots that captivated scientists and observers alike.
Can you guess what’s creating those unusual bright spots on Ceres? Until Dawn gets a closer look over the next few months, it’s anyone’s guess what those spots could be.
To learn more and to cast your vote, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/dawn/world_ceres/.
For more information about the Dawn mission, visit http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Second Annual NASA HBCUs/MSIs Partnerships Meeting
The NASA Headquarters Office of Small Business Programs is hosting the Second Annual NASA Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Serving Institutions Partnerships Meeting. The event will take place on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. CDT at the Davidson Center in Huntsville, Alabama.
This event is targeting NASA’s immediate and future subcontracting opportunities for HBCUs and MSIs. This is an opportunity to network with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors including Aerojet Rocketdyne, Ch2M Hill, Jacobs, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Orbital ATK, SAIC, Teledyne Brown Engineering, The Boeing Company, United Launch Alliance and Wyle.
Registration is free, and attendance by the entire HBCU/MSI community is encouraged. The one-day event is part of an overall NASA initiative designed to increase prime and subcontract opportunities with HBCU/MSIs.
For more information and to register to attend, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2nd-annual-nasa-historically-black-colleges-universities-hbcusminority-serving-institutions-msis-tickets-17209164073.
Please direct questions about this event to MSFC-SmallBusiness@mail.nasa.gov.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

International Observe the Moon Night
On Sept. 19, 2015, the whole world has the chance to admire and celebrate our moon on International Observe the Moon Night. And you can join in the fun!
Check the map of registered observation events at http://observethemoonnight.org to see if an event is being held near you. If not, please consider registering and hosting one and inviting your community.
You don’t know where to start?
This link walks you through the process of planning an event of any size. See how to host an event in six easy steps:http://observethemoonnight.org/getInvolved.
Do you need suggestions for hands-on activities?
Visit http://observethemoonnight.org/activities/ for ideas.
Are you worried about cloudy weather obscuring your view of the moon?
The “Moon as Art” collection, chosen by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, team, gives the public the opportunity to see the moon as others have seen it for centuries — as an inspirational muse. But this time, also see the moon from the perspective of being in orbit with a series of eyes that see different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Learn more athttp://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/moonartgallery.html.
Additional beautiful, high-resolution images of the moon’s surface taken by LRO’s cameras are available at http://lroc.sese.asu.edu.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Lora.V.Bleacher@nasa.gov.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.
There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visithttp://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2016 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition
NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2016 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as the RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.
The Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to Johnson for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the mission control team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks that include sample collection and acquisition. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s), microphone(s), or other onboard sensors.
Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Sept. 23, 2015, and teams must submit a project plan for their proposed project by Oct. 3, 2015.
The Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in late May 2016. Each of the selected teams will be provided with a $10,000 stipend to develop their rover.
The Robo-Ops competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.
For more information about this competition, visit http://robo-ops.nianet.org.
If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Center for Astronomy Education Teaching Excellence Workshops — Fall/Winter 2015-16
NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of educator workshops for astronomy and space science educators.
These workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies. During many microteaching events, you will have the opportunity to role-play the parts of student and instructor. You will assess and critique each other’s implementation in real time as part of a supportive learning community. You will have the opportunity to use unfamiliar teaching techniques in collaboration with mentors before using them with your students. CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.
Sept. 26-27, 2015 — University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors
Oct. 3, 2015 — Guilford Technical Community College in Jamestown, North Carolina
CAE Southeast Regional Teaching Exchange

Oct. 17, 2015– Everett Community College in Everett, Washington
CAE Northwest Regional Teaching Exchange
November 2015 — American Center for Physics in College Park, Maryland
New Faculty Workshop for Physics and Astronomy
Jan. 3-4, 2016– Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Florida
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop for Current and Future Astronomy and Space Science Instructors
For more information and to register for workshops online, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.
Inquiries about this series of workshops should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Call for Proposals — NASA Research Announcement for Use of the NASA Physical Sciences Informatics System: Appendix A

NASA is seeking ground-based research proposals from graduate students to use NASA’s Physical Sciences Informatics system to develop new analyses and scientific insights. The PSI system is designed to be a resource for researchers to data mine information generated from completed physical sciences experiments performed on the International Space Station or from related ground-based studies.
This solicitation appendix focuses on the following five research areas: combustion science, complex fluids, fluid physics, fundamental physics and materials science.
For graduate students (students working towards an advanced degree), this NASA Research Announcement is soliciting proposals that advance fundamental research in one of the physical sciences disciplines identified above and also assist in the awarding of an advanced degree to the graduate student. This call is open to students who meet the following eligibility requirements:
— The student is pursuing an advanced degree directly related to a physical sciences discipline — only technical degrees are permitted (not degrees in policy or management).
— The student is a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident alien of the U.S., or on a student visa at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission.
— The student is enrolled in a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission, or, if the student is an undergraduate starting their graduate studies, he or she has been accepted to a master’s or doctoral degree program at an accredited U.S. university at the time of application submission and will start during the next academic year.
— The student has an academic graduate advisor who will submit the application for the graduate student. The student must perform the proposed research under the guidance of the assigned graduate advisor.
The agency expects to make approximately 10-15 awards in early 2016, The award for each proposal selected from this Appendix will be $50,000 – $75,000 per year, for a total maximum award amount up to $150,000 for a two-year period. Research and development efforts will take place over two years.
The deadline for submitting proposals is Sept. 30, 2015.
For information concerning this NASA Research Announcement solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1EiCJkv.
For more information about the Physical Science Informatics System, visit http://psi.nasa.gov/home.aspx.
Please direct questions about this NASA Research Announcement to Dr. Francis Chiaramonte at francis.p.chiaramonte@nasa.gov.
Additional technical information about the Physical Science Informatics System for this NASA Research Announcement is available from:
Name: Teresa Miller
Title: Physical Sciences Informatics System – Technical POC
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
Email: teresa.y.miller@nasa.gov
Phone: 256-544-7815

NASA opportunities for the K12 education

Registration Now Open for NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015
Audience: Higher Education Educators & Students
Event Date: May 18-22, 2015
NASA Rockets 2 Racecars Educator Professional Development Opportunity at Richmond International Raceway 2014
Audience: All Educators
Event Dates: Sept. 5-6, 2014
International Observe the Moon Night
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 6, 2014
Free Education Webinar From NASA Educator Professional Development — Microbes in Space
Audience: K-12 In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Event Date: Sept. 9, 2014, at 7 p.m. EDT
Free Webinar — Secrets to Fundraising for Competing in NASA Challenges
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Webinar Date: Sept. 10, 2014
Family Day Event at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 13, 2014
Call for Papers — The NACA Centenary: A Symposium on 100 Years of Aerospace Research and Development
Audience: Scholars and Graduate Students
Submission Deadline: Sept. 15, 2014
MAVEN Workshop — Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!
Audience: Elementary Educators
Application Deadline: Sept. 15, 2014
Workshop Date: Sept. 21, 2014
Second Annual Astrobiology Symposium at the Library of Congress
Audience: All Educators and 9-Higher Education Students
Symposium Dates: Sept. 18-19, 2014
Launch Opportunity: RockSat-C and RockSat-X Programs
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 19, 2014
2015 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Notice of Intent Requested by Sept. 19, 2014
Proposal Deadline: Oct. 10, 2014
NASA Family Education Night at Kennedy Space Center
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Sept. 20, 2014
National Mars Education Conference — Mars and the Comet: How to Use Natural Events as NGSS-Aligned Teachable Moments in Your Classroom
Audience: All Educators
Application Deadline: Sept. 23, 2014
Conference Date: Sept. 27, 2014
Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2014
Audience: 9-12 Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: Sept. 24, 2014
Send Your Name to the Asteroid Bennu!
Audience: Educators and Students Worldwide
Deadline: Sept. 30, 2014
Presidential Management Fellows Program: STEM Opportunity
Audience: Graduate Students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Disciplines
Application Period Will Open Sept. or Oct. 2014
OSSI NIFS — Spring 2015 Opportunities
Audience: Higher Education Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 12, 2014
Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces 2014 Fall Missions
Audience: Middle School Educators and Students, and the Informal Education Community
Mission Dates: Oct. 21-24, 2014, and Nov. 18-21, 2014
2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix
Audience: Minority Universities
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 12, 2014
2014 Humans in Space Art Video Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Early Career Professionals
Deadline: Nov. 15, 2014
What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website
Audience: K-6 Educators
Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Registration Now Open for NASA Robotic Mining Competition 2015

The Sixth Annual NASA Robotic Mining Competition will be held at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center May 18-22, 2015. NASA’s Robotic Mining Competition is for university-level students, enrolled in a U.S. college or university. Teams are challenged to design and build a mining robot that can traverse the simulated Martian chaotic terrain, excavate Martian regolith and deposit the regolith into a collector bin within 10 minutes. There is particular relevance to NASA’s recently announced mission to find an asteroid by 2016 and then bring it to cislunar space. NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative excavation concepts from universities, which may result in ideas and solutions that could be applied to an actual excavation device or payload.
The winning team will receive the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence trophy, KSC launch invitations, team certificates for each member and a monetary team scholarship. Awards for other categories include monetary team scholarships, a school trophy or plaque, team and individual certificates, and KSC launch invitations.
Design teams must include at least one college or university faculty member and at least two undergraduate or graduate students. NASA has not set an upper limit on team members. A team should have a sufficient number of members to successfully operate their mining robot. Teams will compete in up to five major competition categories, including onsite mining, systems engineering paper, outreach project, slide presentation and demonstration (optional) and team spirit (optional).
Registration opened on Sept. 3, 2014, and is limited to 50 teams.
For more information, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/technology/nasarmc.html.
Follow the NASA Robotic Mining Competition on Twitter athttps://twitter.com/NASARMC.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Bethanné Hull at Bethanne.Hull@nasa.gov.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________
NASA Rockets 2 Racecars Educator Professional Development Opportunity at Richmond International Raceway 2014

Calling all science and math teachers — Come to Richmond International Raceway on Fri., Sept. 5, 2014, from noon to 7 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 6, 2014, from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. and become an ambassador of NASA content on NASA-inspired activities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Team up with NASA education specialists in the VA529 Kid Zone and earn hours of professional development for every hour spent at the track. Participating teachers will receive a free ticket for the NASCAR Nationwide Race on Fri., Sept. 5, 2014.
Learn about all the different NASA-inspired hands-on activities by visiting http://tinyurl.com/NASAR2RatRIR2014.
Register today by sending an email to NASA Education Specialists Marilé Colón Robles at marile.colonrobles@nasa.gov or Bonnie Murray at bonnie.murray@nasa.gov.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

International Observe the Moon Night

On Sept. 6, 2014, the whole world has the chance to admire and celebrate our moon on International Observe the Moon Night. And you can join in the fun!
Check the map of registered observation events athttp://observethemoonnight.org to see if there is an event being held near you. If not, please consider registering and hosting one and inviting your family, friends or neighbors.
Don’t know where to start?
This link walks you through the process of planning an event of any size. How to host an event in six easy steps:http://observethemoonnight.org/getInvolved/.
Need suggestions for hands-on activities?
Visit http://observethemoonnight.org/activities/ for ideas.
Worried about cloudy weather obscuring your view of the moon?
The “Moon as Art” collection, chosen by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, team, gives the public the opportunity to see the moon as others have seen it for centuries — as an inspirational muse — but this time from the perspective of being in orbit with a series of eyes that see in different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Learn more at http://lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov/moonartgallery.html.
Additional beautiful, high-resolution images of the moon’s surface taken by LRO’s cameras are available at http://lroc.sese.asu.edu.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed toLora.V.Bleacher@nasa.gov.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Free Education Webinar From NASA Educator Professional Development — Microbes in Space

Join NASA Educator Professional Development on Sept. 9, 2014, at 7 p.m. EDT, for a look at some of the big questions concerning life science. How do scientists classify living things? What role do universal ancestors play in classification? What would life look like on other worlds? Participants in this hourlong webinar will discuss the answers to these questions and more.
For more information and to register online, visit https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1088539485/en/events/event/shared/1097653603/event_landing.html?sco-id=1214580293.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Free Webinar — Secrets to Fundraising for Competing in NASA Challenges

NASA has several exciting technical challenges open for universities and colleges. The challenges include the Student Launch, the Robotic Mining Competition, the Human Exploration Rover Challenge, the X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge, as well other challenges. In order to be successful, teams not only need to master engineering and technical obstacles, they must also raise the funding necessary for equipment and travel expenses.
To help all universities and colleges interested in competing, the NASA Minority Innovation Challenges Institute, or MICI, is hosting a free webinar on Sept. 10, 2014, at 3 p.m. EDT. Topics covered during the session will include:
— Fundraising practices utilized by teams that competed in the 2014 NASA Robotic Mining Competition.
— How to locate potential donors, and the best way to land contributions.
— How to use crowdfunding websites to expand fundraising efforts to regional and national levels.
— Grant opportunities that are open and receptive to funding university teams.
The webinar will be hosted by a certified fundraising executive along with two certified grant writers.
To sign up for this webinar and gain access to MICI’s other free webinars, visit http://nasamici.com/upcoming-sessions.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Mary Baker atmary@nasamici.com.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Family Day Event at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum

The Smithsonian’s family day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events are free and open to the public.
Women in Aviation and Space
Sept. 13, 2014, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT
Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, District of Columbia

From the days of the earliest pilots to today’s space program, women have been making significant contributions. Celebrate the incredible contributions of women in aviation and space exploration at the “Women in Aviation and Space” family day. During this event, visitors will have the opportunity to meet female role models and learn about the women who inspired them.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/detail.cfm?id=11599

Questions about this series of events should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-1000.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Call for Papers — The NACA Centenary: A Symposium on 100 Years of Aerospace Research and Development

The Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum, or NASM, and NASA’s History Program Office invite proposals for papers to a special symposium commemorating a century of aerospace research and development. On March 3, 1915, the U.S. Congress established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA, “to separate the real from the imagined and make known the overlooked and unexpected” in the quest for flight. In honor of that centennial, NASA and NASM will team to present a symposium on the history of the NACA. This historical symposium will be held in Washington, District of Columbia, on March 3-4, 2015.
All are invited to submit proposals. Major themes to be addressed in the symposium include:
— The NACA organizational and institutional structure and evolution.
— The NACA model of public/private partnerships in aerospace research.
— The NACA’s contributions to aerospace theory, ground research and flight operations.
— Individual projects.
— Broad themes in the history of the agency.
— Research projects versus other structural attributes.
— The social, economic and/or political history of the NACA.
— The NACA culture and its evolution.
— The relationship of the NACA to other entities, both private and public.
— Innovation in aerospace research.
— Models of partnership.
Possible topics are not restricted to these major themes. All papers are envisioned as scholarly contributions exploring broad thematic issues and questions.
Contributions from international scholars and graduate students with an interest in this history are welcome.
Some travel support scholarships may be available for international scholars and graduate students. Please indicate your interest in a need statement included with your paper proposal.
We intend that a subset of the papers will merit publication.
Proposals for papers should include a title and an abstract, as well as the author’s curriculum vita, and travel support need statement (as appropriate). Please send all proposals, in the form of a 300-word abstract and a brief vita electronically to Dr. William P. Barry, NASA chief historian, at bill.barry@nasa.gov, and Dr. Roger D. Launius, associate director for Collections and Curatorial Affairs at the National Air and Space Museum, launiusr@si.edu. The deadline for abstract submissions is Sept. 15, 2014.
Decisions about acceptance and support will be made by Nov. 1, 2014.
For more information about the Call for Papers, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/naca100years/.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MAVEN Workshop — Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!

The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission is set to arrive at Mars on Sept. 21, 2014. Celebrate the arrival with the MAVEN education team at this one-day workshop about the mission and the accompanying elementary program, Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore! The program features six standards-based lessons that combine science, literacy and art to help students understand planetary habitability and the MAVEN mission.
The workshop will include dinner and lectures by MAVEN scientists. Following the workshop, participants will watch the NASA TV broadcast of the MAVEN spacecraft’s arrival at Mars.
The workshop will take place on Sept. 21, 2014, in Boulder, Colorado. Registration is $20 and includes coffee, snacks and dinner. Applications are due Sept. 15, 2014, but space is limited so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.
For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visithttp://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/red-planet/boulder-workshop/.
Please email any questions about this opportunity toepomail@lasp.colorado.edu.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Second Annual Astrobiology Symposium at the Library of Congress
The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, in cooperation with the NASA Astrobiology Program, is hosting the second annual Astrobiology Symposium on Sept. 18-19, 2014.
“Preparing for Discovery: A Rational Approach to the Impact of Finding Microbial, Complex or Intelligent Life Beyond Earth,” is a two-day symposium featuring panel discussions, lectures and audience question-and-answer sessions. Panel members include professors, scientists, philosophers and astronomers representing various universities and organizations including NASA, the SETI Institute and the Library of Congress.
The event is free and open to the public. No pre-registration is required. For those unable to attend the symposium in person, the two-day event will be streamed live via webcast athttps://ac.arc.nasa.gov/loc/.
For more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/nasa-program-2014.html.
Questions about the symposium should be directed to Jason Steinhauer at jste@loc.gov.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Launch Opportunity: RockSat-C and RockSat-X Programs

NASA, in partnership with the Colorado Space Grant Consortium, is offering the opportunity for university instructors and students to participate in three programs designed for everyone from the novice to the more experienced space researcher.
RockSat-C is a competitive program for university and community college students to design and build a sounding rocket payload, and then launch the payload on a sounding rocket at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The program actively engages students through full design-process mentoring, with assistance through the design phase throughout the fall semester. During the spring semester, teams are lead through testing and integration reviews, along with a launch readiness review.
RockSat-X pushes the RockSat-C concept to new extremes by providing participants with full access to the space environment, more in-flight resources and less restrictive design space. Deployable items are even allowed. In addition, payloads will be provided power and a live telemetry feed for real-time data acquisition during the flight. These amenities allow experimenters to focus more on the science and leave power and data handling to the Wallops rocket team.
Selected RockSat-C experiments will launch in June 2015. RockSat-X experiments are expected to launch later in the summer.
Student teams who are up to the challenge are invited to submit an intent to fly form before Sept. 19, 2014.
To learn more about Rocket-C and to see experiments selected for previous flights, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rs-c-2015-home.
Questions about the RockSat-C program should be directed to Becca Lidvall by email at rocksatprogram@gmail.com.
To learn more about RockSat-X and to see experiments selected for previous flights, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rs-x-2015-home.
Questions about the RockSat-X program should be directed to Jesse Austin by email at rocksatx@gmail.com.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2015 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering or science students.
The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to Johnson Space Center for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the mission control team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks that include sample collection and acquisition. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboard sensors.
Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Sept. 19, 2014, and teams must submit a project plan for their proposed projects by Oct. 10, 2014. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2015, providing each selected team with a $10,000 stipend to develop its rover. $12,000 in cash awards is available to the winning teams.
The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.
For more information about this competition, visithttp://www.nianet.org/RoboOps.
If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears atshelley.spears@nianet.org.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA Family Education Night at Kennedy Space Center
NASA is hosting the annual NASA Family Education Night on Sept. 20, 2014, from 2 – 6 p.m. EDT at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
The event, targeted for first- through sixth-grade students and their parents, will focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, with the theme Technology Drives Exploration. Educational activities and demonstrations will highlight the future of America’s space program and allow children to apply critical thinking skills, make and launch rockets and talk with a former astronaut.
For more information, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/centers/kennedy/home/index.html.
Questions about the event should be directed to Joshua Santora atjoshua.santora@nasa.gov.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Mars Education Conference — Mars and the Comet: How to Use Natural Events as NGSS-Aligned Teachable Moments in Your Classroom

Mars and the Comet…Close Encounters of the Natural Kind!
Have you ever wondered how to turn natural events into rich, teachable science moments in your classroom? Join NASA’s Mars Education team to learn Next Generation Science Standards-aligned strategies to use natural events as timely learning opportunities. The conference will focus on a fantastic, dramatic natural event that is taking place very soon — Comet Siding Spring is on track to have a close encounter with Mars on Oct. 19, 2014!
Mars Program Chief Scientist Dr. Richard Zurek from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory will be the featured guest speaker. He will provide educators with the latest information about how NASA will address this challenging natural event.
Find out how Mars related activities can enhance your curriculum. Learn about the newest Red Planet discoveries and new classroom science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, tools. In addition, attendees will be introduced to NGSS STEM hands-on activities and ways to extend students’ learning with critical thinking and project-based learning challenges. Conference participants will receive lesson plans, NASA materials and a certificate with 6 ½ professional development hours.
Applications are due Sept. 23, 2014.
For more information, visit http://marsed.asu.edu/naturalevents.
Questions about the conference should be directed to Sheri Klug Boonstra at sklug@asu.edu or marsed@asu.edu.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

REGISTRATION OPEN: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2014

The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2014 will take place this fall, offering U. S. high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space.
Zero Robotics challenges high school student teams to write their own algorithms to fly the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The competition starts online where teams compete to solve an annual challenge guided by mentors. Students can create, edit, share, save, simulate and submit code from a Web browser. After several phases of virtual competition, finalists will be selected to compete in a live championship aboard the International Space Station.
Registration for the competition closes on Sept. 24, 2014. The competition begins with a live webcast kickoff event from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Sept. 6, 2014. To be an official competitor, code for the 2D Practice competition must be submitted by Sept. 26, 2014.
For more information about the tournament and to register your team to participate, visit http://www.zerorobotics.mit.edu.
Zero Robotics is organized by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Space Systems Laboratory, Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and TopCoder, and is sponsored by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, NASA and the Center for Advancement of Science in Space.
Please email any questions about this opportunity tozerorobotics@mit.edu.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Send Your Name to the Asteroid Bennu!
NASA is inviting people around the world to submit their names to be etched on a microchip aboard a spacecraft headed to the asteroid Bennu in 2016.
The “Messages to Bennu!” microchip will travel to the asteroid aboard the Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer, or OSIRIS-REx, spacecraft. The robotic mission will spend more than two years at the asteroid, which has a width of approximately 1,760 feet (500 meters). The spacecraft will collect a sample of Bennu’s surface and return it to Earth in a sample return capsule.
The deadline to submit names online is Sept. 30, 2014. Participants who submit their names to the “Messages to Bennu!” campaign will be able to print a certificate of appreciation to document their involvement.
For more information and to submit your name, visithttp://planetary.org/bennu.
Participants who “follow” or “like” the mission on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/OSIRISREx) will receive updates on the location of their names in space from launch time until the asteroid samples return to Earth in 2023. Facebook fans also will receive mission progress and late-breaking news through regular status updates.
For more information about the OSIRIS-REx mission, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/osiris-rex and http://osiris-rex.lpl.arizona.edu.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed totps@planetary.org.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Presidential Management Fellows Program: STEM Opportunity
NASA and other federal agencies are always looking for the best and brightest science and engineering talent. To help agencies find those talented individuals, the Office of Personnel Management, or OPM, has developed and piloted a track of the Presidential Management Fellows program focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM.
The Presidential Management Fellows, or PMF, program is a federal-wide, flagship leadership development program for advanced degree candidates. The program attracts and selects the best candidates possible and is designed with a focus on developing a cadre of potential government leaders. The PMF-STEM track seeks to identify the best future government leaders in STEM disciplines and place them in entry-level positions in federal agencies around the country. PMF-STEM was piloted last year with a low-key rollout.
This year, OPM would like to expand the PMF-STEM track to continue to support the STEM needs of the federal government.
— The PMF-STEM program is open to graduate students in STEM fields (degree must be confirmed by Aug. 31, 2015).
— Applicants must be U.S. citizens.
— The annual call for applications comes out in the fall (September – October) on www.USAJobs.gov and is generally open for two weeks.
— Applicants must apply through www.USAJobs.gov.
— More information about the program and application process, including a detailed list of eligibility requirements, can be found atwww.pmf.gov, and information on the PMF-STEM track can be found at http://www.pmf.gov/the-opportunity/pmf-stem.aspx.
Federal agencies hire PMF-STEM finalists into paid, entry-level, two-year fellowship positions. At the end of the fellowship, finalists have two years of federal work experience and may be noncompetitively converted into permanent positions within the federal government. NASA participated in the 2014 pilot and intends to actively consider PMF-STEM candidates for the 2015 program.
Questions about this opportunity may be directed to pmf@opm.gov.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

OSSI NIFS — Spring 2015 Opportunities

NASA’s One Stop Shopping Initiative for Internships, Fellowships and Scholarships, or OSSI NIFS, strives to provide high school students and undergraduate and graduate students at all institutions of higher education access to a portfolio of internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities offered by NASA mission directorates and centers.
Visit the Office of Education Infrastructure Division LaunchPad to find information on internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities. The site features the OSSI NIFS online application for recruiting NASA interns, fellows and scholars. This innovative system allows students to search and apply for all types of higher education NASA internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities in one location. A single application places the student in the applicant pool for consideration by all NASA mentors.
Applications for spring 2015 opportunities are due Oct. 12, 2014.
To find available opportunities and to fill out an online application, visithttps://intern.nasa.gov/index.html.
Inquiries about OSSI NIFS should be submitted viahttps://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces 2014 Fall Missions

Students and educators have two chances to participate in Sally Ride EarthKAM this fall. The 2014 fall missions are scheduled to take placeOct. 21-24, 2014, and Nov. 18-21, 2014. Guide your students in hands-on research as they program a camera aboard the International Space Station to take pictures of specific locations on Earth. The optional online curricula at the Sally Ride EarthKAM website are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.
For more information and to register for an upcoming mission, visit the Sally Ride EarthKAM home page at https://earthkam.ucsd.edu/.
If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please email ek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New Appendix

NASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.
Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.
Proposals are due Nov. 12, 2014.
For more information regarding the MIRO solicitation, please visit theNASA EONS page on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at:http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open .
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2014 Humans in Space Art Video Challenge

The Humans in Space Art Program and NASA’s International Space Station Program have teamed up to launch the international Humans in Space Art Challenge. How will humans use space science and technology to benefit humanity? College students and early career professionals are invited to ponder this question and to express an answer creatively in a video less than three minutes long. Video artwork can be of any style, featuring original animation, sketches, music, live action drama, poetry, dance, Rube Goldberg machines, apps, etc. Younger students may also participate, but all artwork will be judged in one age category.
Individuals or teams of participants should include one clear reference to the International Space Station in their videos and may use space station footage if desired.
An interdisciplinary team of space representatives and art experts will evaluate the videos. NASA and the Humans in Space Art program will make the highest scoring artwork visible worldwide through online and local touring events. NASA will also take the winning video on a trip into orbit on the International Space Station and provide montages with flown patches for winners.
Submissions must be received by Nov. 15, 2014.
For additional information and a complete list of guidelines, visithttp://www.lpi.usra.edu/humansinspaceart/challenge/.
Inquiries about this opportunity should be directed tohumansinspaceart@lpi.usra.edu.
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

What’s New at NASA’s Space Place Website

It’s that time again — the beginning of a new school year! Here at the Space Place, we know that it can be a stressful time for educators. That’s why we think it’s a great idea to remind you of all the helpful resources we have developed specifically for you. Do you want material presented in visual, written and animated formats for reading exercises in line with the Common Core? Look no further than our new “Space Place in a Snap” series. Do you want a handy way to provide Space Place activities to all your students even if they don’t have a computer? We’ve made all of them available in PDF! Struggling to come up with material relevant to the Next Generation Science Standards, or NGSS? Check out our helpful NGSS search feature in the educators’ section. While you are there, be sure to check out all the other great resources we provide.

What’s New? Jupiter!
From massive planets, long distances and extreme forces, it’s a challenge for educators — let alone students — to fully grasp the sizes and scales behind astronomical and planetary science. The Space Place grapples with just this issue in one of its latest additions — a new article titled “What’s it like inside Jupiter?” Building up from the pressure you might feel at the bottom of a pool all the way to the pressure felt in Jupiter’s core, this article uses midsize sedans as its primary unit of measurement. It comes with a fun animation, too. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/jupiter.
What’s New? Tectonics ‘Snap!’
We’ve got a new release in our popular series “Space Place in a Snap.” This time the combined poster and animation presentation tackles the concepts behind plate tectonics and the shifting nature of Earth’s crust. This is a great resource for any earth science curriculum. Check it out at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/tectonics-snap.
Spotlight on Space Place Activities
With the arrival of the new school year, it’s a good time to remember that our popular make-and-do activities are now available to download as easy-to-hand-out, ready-to-print PDF files. Perfect for the classroom or afterschool programs, these activities are a great way to bring the Space Place to all your students even if there are a limited number of computers or Internet connections. Check out popular activities like “Build Your Own Spacecraft,” “Make Oreo Moon Phases” and “Get Your Gummy Greenhouse Gases.” The downloads are sorted by topic and can be found athttp://spaceplace.nasa.gov/make-do-pdf/.
For the Classroom
What better way to decorate your classroom than with the Space Place calendar? It’s now available for the 2014-2015 school year! The calendar has beautiful images and a plethora of fascinating NASA facts and trivia. You can download it month by month, or as a complete set, at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/calendar.
For Outside the Classroom
Everybody loves a good story. Why not read an educational one? We’ve posted an entertaining new article on the discovery of Uranus. Despite being visible to the naked eye in the night sky, it was discovered thousands of years after the other visible planets of our solar system. Find out the reasons why and learn the story behind this much-delayed discovery at http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/uranus.
Special Days

Sept. 5: National Cheese Pizza Day.
Make a galactic mobile with the cardboard from your pizza.http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/galactic-mobile
Sept. 13: Positive-Thinking Day
Make your positive ions outnumber your negative ions when you do the “Ions in Action” experiment. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/ion-balloons
Sept. 16: Collect Rocks Day
Asteroids are big rocks in space. But how are they different from comets? http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/posters/#solarsystem
Sept. 18: Voyager I took first full frame photo of Earth and Moon together, 1977.
Check out other photos of the solar system at the Space Place.http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/gallery-solar-system
Oct. 4: First satellite, Sputnik, launched by Soviet Union, 1957.
Do comets or asteroids do more than explode or kill off dinosaurs?http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/comet-ocean/en/.
Oct. 14: Dessert Day.
Make yummy El Niño Pudding for dessert today.http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/el-nino
Oct. 29: Internet Day.
Celebrate by downloading some Space Place wallpaper for your computer desktop. http://spaceplace.nasa.gov/wallpaper

Dr. Kristin Yvonne Rozier – No More Helicopter Parenting: Intelligent Autonomous UAS's

Congratualtions Kristin Yvonne Rozier

Dr. Kristin Yvonne Rozier – No More Helicopter Parenting: Intelligent Autonomous UAS’s

NASA’s efforts to promote careers in STEM

Jul 28, 2014

Safety is NASA’s top priority! The search for innovative new ways to validate and verify is vital for the development of safety-critical systems. Such techniques have been successfully used to assure systems for air traffic control, airplane separation assurance, autopilots, logic designs, medical devices, and other functions that ensure human safety. Safety is important to ensure at all stages of a system’s lifetime, from design time to run time.
We take a look at an exciting recent advancement in run time System Health Management (SHM) for totally autonomous Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) tasked with important missions like wild-fire surveillance and earthquake response.
Our real-time, Realizable, Responsive, Unobtrusive Unit (rt-R2U2) meets the emerging needs for SHM of new safety-critical embedded systems like automated vehicles, UAS, or small satellites. SHM for these systems must be able to handle unexpected situations and adapt specifications quickly during flight testing between closely-timed consecutive missions, and must enable more advanced probabilistic reasoning for diagnostics and prognostics while running aboard limited hardware without affecting the certified on-board software.
Come learn about the new technologies that can enable a fire-fighting UAS to fly!
The series is presented by the Office of the Chief Scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center as part of the Center’s 75th anniversary celebration.
 
LOVE FROM THE CYBERPLAYGROUND!!!
GO SYSTER GO

NASA – MEET ED STONE Intersteller Human Race space traveler

Through the Eyes of Scientists — Meet Edward Stone

Edward Stone describes how he was always interested in what was new as a young man and how space physics got his attention.
When the Atomic Age Began it was a lot of fun!
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KsJhvm7D_Q&w=560&h=315]
Aug 4, 2013
INTERVIEW WITH DR. ED STONE (Project Scientist)
Professor of Physics and Project Scientist Dr. Ed Stone discusses the success of the Voyager mission.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJ1sKKQQKQc&w=560&h=315]
 

Congrats to Ed Stone who took USA to Interstellar Space

Voyager Project Scientist Honored by NASA–Via Stephen Colbert

MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
PASADENA, CALIF. 91109 TELEPHONE 818-354-5011
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

2013-349
December 4, 2013

VOYAGER PROJECT SCIENTIST HONORED BY NASA–VIA STEPHEN COLBERT

Galactic commander and talk show host Stephen "Tiberius" Colbert presented Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA's Voyager mission, with a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Stone was a guest on Colbert's show on Dec. 3, 2013.

Galactic commander and talk show host Stephen “Tiberius” Colbert presented Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA’s Voyager mission, with a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Stone was a guest on Colbert’s show on Dec. 3, 2013. Image Credit: Courtesy of K. Long › larger image

Against the backdrop of an image of Saturn's rings taken by NASA's Voyager mission, project scientist Ed Stone describes the 36-year journey of the two Voyager spacecraft. Stone was a guest on the Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013.

Against the backdrop of an image of Saturn’s rings taken by NASA’s Voyager mission, project scientist Ed Stone describes the 36-year journey of the two Voyager spacecraft. Stone was a guest on the Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013. Image Credit: Courtesy of K. Long › larger image

Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA's Voyager mission, stands with his NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and accompanying certificate. He received the award on the talk show The Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013.

Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA’s Voyager mission, stands with his NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and accompanying certificate. He received the award on the talk show The Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013. Image Credit: Courtesy of K. Long › larger image

As if NASA’s Voyager mission didn’t have enough firsts in its 36-year journey, what with sending the first spacecraft to Uranus, Neptune and, most recently, interstellar space! Now, it has another first back here on Earth: on last night’s episode of the Colbert Report (12/3/13), host Stephen Colbert floated across the stage in a spacesuit worthy of a1950s-era sci-fi movie and presented Voyager Project Scientist Ed Stone with a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. The prestigious award honors Stone for his work as project scientist of the venerable Voyager spacecraft since 1972.
“I was on the Colbert Report to talk about what I think of as humankind’s greatest — and certainly most extensive — journey of exploration, and I certainly didn’t expect the host to hand me an award,” said Stone, a professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology and former director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. “That surprise on my face was real.”
The NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal is the highest honor for a non-government individual. The citation, put forth by NASA’s associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, John Grunsfeld, commended Stone “for a lifetime of extraordinary scientific achievement and outstanding leadership of space science missions, and for his exemplary sharing of the exciting results with the public.”
Stone grew up in Burlington, Iowa, and attended Burlington Junior College and the University of Chicago. He was inspired to enter the fields of planetary science and space exploration by the launch of Sputnik in 1957, and his career has spanned the space age.
Stone has been a member of the Caltech faculty since 1967. In 1972, he became the Voyager project scientist, and he has the distinction of serving as Voyager’s one-and-only project scientist. He has seen the two spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, through the planetary encounters of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune and is now eagerly poring through the data coming back from Voyager 1, now exploring interstellar space.
While serving as director of JPL from 1991 to 2001, Stone oversaw numerous NASA projects, such as Galileo’s mission around Jupiter, the launch of the Cassini mission to Saturn, a new generation of Earth science satellites and the successful Pathfinder landing on Mars.
Stone’s current projects also include serving as vice chair of the board of directors of the Thirty Meter Telescope project, which is preparing to build the most advanced and powerful optical telescope to date.
A clip of last night’s show is online at: http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/430941/december-03-2013/ed-stone . The clip showing Ed Stone receiving the award is athttp://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/430942/december-03-2013/sign-off—honoring-ed-stone.
A Q&A about Stone and Voyager 1’s arrival in interstellar space is online at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/interstellarvoyager/q-and-a/
The Voyager spacecraft were built and continue to be operated by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, Calif. Caltech manages JPL for NASA. The Voyager missions are a part of NASA’s Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.
For more information about Voyager, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.
Jia-Rui Cook 818-354-0850
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
jccook@jpl.nasa.gov
Silent Ambassador

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround NASA STEM Education

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Curious about our nearest star, water on Mars, the first trip to Pluto and other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. ET and is followed by a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take place at 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 7, 2013 — Oh, Swear Not by the Inconstant Sun
For 50 years, the Smithsonian monitored changes in the sun’s power. Secretary Charles Greeley Abbott asserted that solar variations could influence weather patterns and crop yields. What was he detecting? Dr. David DeVorkin will explore the inconstant nature of the sun.
Dec. 14, 2013 — First Mission to Pluto: The Origins and Voyage of New Horizons
In July 2015, New Horizons will become the first spacecraft to fly through the Pluto system. Dr. Michael Neufeld will discuss the goal of this mission and the promise of new science from it.
Jan. 11, 2014 — Solar Loops: Tackling a 40-Year-Old Mystery
The loops that cover the sun’s outer atmosphere have been studied for over 40 years, but their basic properties remain unknown. Astrophysicist Henry “Trae” Winter will discuss the attempts to unravel these mysteries.
For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visithttp://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.
Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.
The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is made possible by a grant from NASA.
__________________________________________________________


2014 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2014 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.
The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to Johnson Space Center for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the mission control team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks that include sample collection and acquisition. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboard sensors.
Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed project by Dec. 8, 2013. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select as many as eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2014.
The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.
For more information about this competition, visithttp://www.nianet.org/RoboOps.
If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.
__________________________________________________________
Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA Education Specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.
Exploring the Engineering Design Process: An Introduction
Audience:
 Grades 3-8 and Informal
Event Date: 
Dec. 9, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Attend this 60-minute webinar and learn how to engage students in the engineering design process through NASA resources. The resources provide opportunities for addressing national science and mathematics learning standards as well as the Next Generation Science Standards.
Earth and Mars: An Atmospheric Perspective
Audience: 
In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Event Date: Dec. 11, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Attend this 60-minute Web seminar and learn the key components of atmospheres that NASA used to safely land the newest and largest rover, Curiosity, on the surface of Mars.
Physics Resources for Elementary Educators
Audience: 
K-5 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 12, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore grades K-5 NASA resources designed to help you teach physics concepts.
For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.
Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to John Entwistle at john.d.entwistle@nasa.gov.
__________________________________________________________
NES Web Seminar — Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space
NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 10, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST. The seminar focuses on human physiology. Obtain information about the effect microgravity has on the physiology of astronauts and learn about the countermeasures NASA uses to help overcome these effects when they return to Earth.
Outer space is an exciting part of our lives and promises to be an even more exciting part of the future for your students. It provides scientists with a unique laboratory, allowing scientific studies never possible in the history of civilization. Future space missions will continue to involve sending humans into space. But after extended stays in microgravity, astronauts must return safely to Earth and lead normal, healthy lives.
This seminar will provide instruction on how to integrate the Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space lesson into your curriculum. There are two classroom activities in this lesson focusing on the effects of spaceflight on human physiology.
Both activities provide opportunities for incorporating national science, technology, and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum as well as addressing high school Next Generation Science Standards.
This seminar will be repeated on March 4, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visithttp://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar28.aspx.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
__________________________________________________________


Green Strides Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Education presents the Green Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from various federal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled throughout the 2013-2014 school year.
The next webinar takes place on Dec. 11, 2013, at 4 p.m. EST.
For more information and registration, visithttp://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/green-strides/webinar.html.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed toGreen.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.
__________________________________________________________


National Air and Space Museum Super Science Saturday Events
Join the National Air and Space Museum on the second Saturday of each month during 2013 for Super Science Saturday at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Through demonstrations and hands-on activities, visitors of all ages will become immersed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics topics related to aviation and space exploration. Each event takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Admission is free, and parking is $15.
Upcoming topics include:
Dec. 14, 2013 — The Wright Brothers
Jan. 11, 2014 — From the Wright Brothers to the Right Stuff
Feb. 8, 2014 — Scientists & Inventors
March 8, 2014 — Space Shuttle
For more information, visithttp://airandspace.si.edu/events/superscience/.
Questions about this series of lectures should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.
__________________________________________________________
NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Small Bodies: Comets ISON

Fly-by asteroids, asteroids disintegrating over Earth, fly-by comets have made 2013 an exciting year for studying and observing small solar system bodies. Join NASA’s Dr. Claudia Alexander, Rosetta project scientist as she discusses Comet ISON and the Rosetta mission in a live teleconference on Dec. 18, 2013, at 1 p.m. EST. Dr. Alexander will discuss different types of small bodies and answer student questions.
If your class is interested in participating in this event via live video conferencing, contact Lyle Tavernier atlyle.tavernier@jpl.nasa.gov.
To view a live webcast of the event and submit questions via email, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/webcast/webcast.html.
__________________________________________________________
Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions, museums and other organizations to screen and request historical artifacts of significance to spaceflight. This is the 20th screening of artifacts since 2009.
Eligible schools, universities, museums, libraries and planetariums may view the artifacts and request specific items through Dec. 23, 2013. Online registrations should include an assigned Department of Education number. Registration also can be made through the State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) office in their state. For instructions, registration, and to view and make requests for artifacts online, visithttp://gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm.
The artifacts are free of charge and are offered “as-is.” Organizations must cover shipping costs and any handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive, while larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs. NASA will work closely with eligible organizations to address any unique handling costs.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed toGSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.
__________________________________________________________
2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP, 2014. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.
The program takes place in summer 2014. Preparatory information and data analysis will take place at the University of California, Irvine. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif.
Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Round-trip travel to California, housing and transportation will be provided.
The deadline for applications is Feb. 7, 2014.
For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2014.
Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2014@nserc.und.edu.
__________________________________________________________
2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM, fields.
Applicants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Student stipends and research support totaling $4,000 during the academic year and $4,500 during a summer semester are available.
These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.
The deadline for submitting applications is Feb.10, 2014.
For more information, visithttp://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.
__________________________________________________________


2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $5,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, research fellowship opportunity is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.
Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory academic and research progress.
This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit recognizing high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.
The deadline for submitting applications is Feb.10, 2014.
For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions about this opportunity torkashiri@odu.edu.
__________________________________________________________
2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, is offering renewable scholarships to sophomore undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000 and are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.
The STEM Bridge Program bridges students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s Mission.
This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit, quality of interest essay as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to students’ interest in STEM areas.
The deadline for submitting applications is March 17, 2014.
For more information, visithttp://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.
__________________________________________________________


2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarship opportunities to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System, or VCCS.
These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA’s missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.
Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the VCCS.
The deadline for submitting applications is March 17, 2014.
For more information, visithttp://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.
__________________________________________________________
NASA Exploration Design Challenge
Students from Kindergarten through 12th grade will have the opportunity to play a unique role in the future of human spaceflight through participation in NASA’s Exploration Design Challenge, or EDC. NASA EDC invites students around the world to think and act like scientists in order to overcome one of the major hurdles of deep space long-duration exploration — the dangers associated with space radiation. Students taking part in the challenge will discover how to plan and design improved radiation shielding aboard the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, currently being developed by NASA, Lockheed Martin and other partners to carry astronauts to space, venturing farther than humans have ever gone before.
Through a series of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, engagement activities, students in grades K-8 will analyze different materials that simulate space radiation shielding and recommend materials that best block radiation and protect astronauts. Students in grades 9-12 will think and act like engineers as they apply what they learn to design shielding to protect a sensor on the Orion crew module from space radiation. After a review of the design solutions submitted by teams in the grades 9-12 challenge, five finalist teams will be selected and matched with a mentor from NASA to test their designs in a virtual simulator. The winning team will build a prototype radiation shield that will be analyzed and submitted to Lockheed Martin for flight certification on the inaugural flight of the Orion Exploration Flight Test, or EFT-1.
The five U.S. finalist teams from the grades 9-12 challenge will be invited to attend the EFT-1 launch, currently scheduled for November 2014. The names of all students, grades K-12, participating in the NASA EDC will fly aboard the spacecraft as honorary virtual crewmembers for Orion’s first flight. The deadline to register students for the virtual crew is July 31, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/spacelife/explorationdesign/overview/index.html#.UdLvoBZU3dI.
For more information about Orion, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/orion.
Email any questions about this opportunity tonasaedc@nianet.org.
__________________________________________________________


MissionSTEM Diversity & Inclusion Leadership Video Series Topic 2
On behalf of NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, the NASA Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is pleased to post the second set of videos in the MissionSTEM Diversity & Inclusion Leadership Series.
This new set of videos features top university leaders describing specific strategies they have used to increase the participation of underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. The video series supports the national goal of educating one million STEM graduates needed in the coming decades to bolster innovation and productivity, educate our citizens and expand our economy.
Over the coming months, the Series will offer several additional diversity and inclusion perspectives and promising practices. Each new set of videos will emphasize a new topic, with previous topics still available on the website. NASA invites you to watch the videos and offer your comments and/or ideas on this critical area for national discussion. By sharing these success stories, NASA strives to help create more diverse STEM education communities and, in turn, advance our Nation’s leadership role in cutting edge technology.
For more information and to view the video series, visit http://missionstem.nasa.gov/diversityInclusionLeadrshp.html.

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround K12 Newsletter: NASA Education

NASA Education

NES Web Seminar — Linear Equations: NASA CONNECT — Breaking Barriers
NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Nov. 21, 2013, at 7:30 p.m. EST. During this professional development session, participants will receive information about the applications of linear equations at NASA and learn how to implement the “Breaking Barriers” student activity. “Breaking Barriers” provides students with an opportunity to step into the shoes of a NASA engineer to design, build and test an X-1 balloon.
The featured activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into curricula as well as addressing middle school Next Generation Science Standards.
This seminar will be repeated on May 28, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar22.aspx.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@nasa.gov.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2014 NASA Student Launch
NASA’s Student Launch is accepting proposals from colleges and universities across the nation. Student Launch is a research-based, competitive and experiential exploration project that provides relevant and cost-effective research and development to support the Space Launch System, or SLS. The project involves teams in an eight-month commitment to design, build and fly payloads or vehicle components that support SLS on high-power rockets.
Proposals are due Nov. 22, 2013, by 9 a.m. EST.
For more information, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/descriptions/Student_Launch.html.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Julie Clift atjulie.d.clift@nasa.gov.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Discover Mapping with NASA
For over 50 years, NASA earth science has transformed the way we look at our planet. Celebrate Geography Awareness Week (Nov. 17-23) and discover a world of resources for real NASA images and data so you and your students can explore the most pressing Earth mysteries.
GeoWeek is an annual public awareness program established in 1987 to highlight geography as a discipline and as a part of everyday life. On Nov. 22, 2013, participate in a Spanish-language webinar and find out how ocean data collected from space can answer questions about processes on Earth.
Find details about these events, NASA educational resources, articles, blog posts and more related to how NASA contributes to the world of mapping on
http://climate.nasa.gov/esw2013.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Science Foundation — East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes

The National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, program provides U.S. graduate students an opportunity to spend eight weeks (10 weeks for Japan) during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific: Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between the National Science Foundation and counterpart agencies in each host location.
EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master’s or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a field of science, engineering or STEM education supported by NSF, including Engineering; Computer and Information Science and Engineering; Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Biological Sciences; Geosciences; Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences; Education (STEM); and Multidisciplinary Research in these fields.
The National Science Foundation provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. Our foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations (arrangements vary by host location).
The application submission deadline for summer 2014 institutes is Nov. 25, 2013.
For additional information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/eapsi.
Please email any questions about this opportunity to oiia-ise-eapsi@nsf.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“Animal Collections” IGES Art Contest
The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, or IGES, invites young scientists and artists to explore groups of animals. Students in grades 2-4 are encouraged to think about their favorite animal group and find the collective noun that describes it. Examples include an army of ants, a lounge of lizards, a parliament of owls and a school of sharks.
After completing their research, students should create a piece of artwork (no larger than 16″x20″) to show what they have learned. Winning artists will receive gift cards, framed color certificates and have their artwork showcased on the IGES website.
The entry deadline has been extended. Entries now must be postmarked byNov. 25, 2013.
For full details on the contest, resources on animal groups and to download an entry form, visit http://strategies.org/education/student-contests/art-contest/2013-animal-collections/.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Emily McLaughlin at
emily_mclaughlin@strategies.org.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA CubeSat Space Missions
NASA is now accepting proposals for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. Proposals must be submitted electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST Nov. 26, 2013.
From the submissions, NASA will select the best proposals by Feb. 7, 2014. Developers whose proposals are selected may have the opportunity to see their creations launched as an auxiliary payload on a mission between 2014 and 2017. NASA will not provide funding for the development of the small satellites and selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity.
CubeSats are a class of cube-shaped research spacecraft called nanosatellites. They are approximately 4 inches long, have a volume of about 1 quart and weigh less than 3 pounds.
CubeSat investigations should be consistent with NASA’s strategic plan and educational vision and goals. The research should address specific aspects of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations.
From the first four rounds of the NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative, 89 payloads from 25 U.S. states made the short list for launch opportunities in 2011 through 2016. Of the selected CubeSats, 12 satellites have already launched. Twenty-one Cubesats are scheduled for launch later this year.
For additional information on NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/directorates/heo/home/CubeSats_initiative.html.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NES Web Seminar — Electromagnetic Spectrum: Remote Sensing Ices on Mars

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences, the NASA Explorer Schools project and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Nov. 26, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EDT. Learn how to use authentic NASA mission data to investigate the composition and distribution of ice in the high-latitude regions of Mars through analysis of visible light, infrared light and gamma rays. The seminar includes information about a unique student extension activity, where students access a free computer simulation illustrating how gamma rays are used to determine the chemical composition of Mars.
The featured activity provides many opportunities for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum as well as addressing high school Next Generation Science Standards.
This seminar will be repeated on March 20, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar9.aspx.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2013 National Community College Aerospace Scholars Program
National Community College Aerospace Scholars, or NCAS, is an interactive online learning experience featuring engineering career possibilities. It is highlighted by an onsite experience where selected students are encouraged to study mathematics, science, engineering or computer science by interacting with engineers at NASA.
The only cost to participants is a $30 registration fee. NASA covers travel, food and lodging. NCAS is open to community college students throughout the United States. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have access to the Internet.
Applications are due Nov. 26, 2013.
For more information and to apply online, visit http://ncas.aerospacescholars.org/.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to jsc-ncas@mail.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2013-2014 National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition

The National Student Solar Spectrograph Competition is the Montana Space Grant Consortium’s Education Program for NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, or IRIS, mission. IRIS will use spectrography and imaging in ultraviolet wavelengths to reveal the dynamics of the sun’s chromospheres and transition region.
This yearly competition is open to undergraduate interdisciplinary teams from colleges and universities across the U.S. Teams are challenged to design and build a working ground-based solar spectrograph and demonstrate the capabilities of the spectrograph as defined by their science goal. Typical teams have three to six students and must have a faculty advisor.
Both substantial scholarship prizes and travel prizes will be given in four categories: best design, best build, best science observations and best presentation of results. Teams may apply for funding of $2,000 per team for project materials. Priority for build funds will be given to minority-serving institutions, community colleges and institutions with less aerospace activity.
Applications for build awards and registrations are due on Nov. 30, 2013.
The competition will be held May 14-16, 2014, in Bozeman, Mont.
For more information and to register online, visit
http://www.spacegrant.montana.edu/IRIS/index.html.
Please email any questions about this competition to Randy Larimer atrlarimer@ece.montana.edu.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement Mission — “Unique Perspectives” Photo and Video Contest

NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission announces the “Unique Perspectives” photo and video contest.
There are many ways to view precipitation. Rain gauges collect water as it hits the ground. Weather radars detect rain and snow as it falls through the air. Research aircraft can measure moisture while flying through clouds, and satellites like the GPM Core Observatory can view precipitation from space.
The GPM team wants to see your photos and videos of precipitation from unique perspectives. Check out weather from all angles — far away, up close, above, below and inside — the more creative and unique, the better.
All entrants must be 13 years old or older. The deadline for submitting photos and videos is Dec. 1, 2013.
For more information and instructions for submitting an entry, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/gpm-unique-perspectives-photo-and-video-contest/.
Questions about this contest should be emailed to Jacob Reed atjacob.b.reed@nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Cassini Scientist for a Day

NASA’s Digital Learning Network is hosting an education event featuring the winners of the Cassini Scientist for a Day essay contest. The contest winners will be given the opportunity to ask questions of Cassini science team members.
Students from around the country were asked to tell scientists which of three targets they would look at with the Cassini spacecraft — Saturn, or one of two of its moons, Dione or Iapetus — and why. Scientists and education specialists selected the winning essays.
Join the webcast on Dec. 3, 2013, at 12:30 p.m. EST to see the winners and to become inspired to enter future contests.
For more information, visit http://dln.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Science Foundation Webinar — Advanced Informal STEM Learning Solicitation
The Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, solicitation was released by the National Science Foundation on Sept. 30, 2013. The AISL program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and develop understanding of deeper learning by participants.
AISL program officers are holding a “102 Digging Deeper into the Solicitation” webinar to provide background and more depth related to key elements of the solicitation. The webinar will also address commonly asked questions compiled from earlier 101 webinars. Notes from the 101 webinars are available online.
The AISL 102 webinar will take place on Dec. 3, 2013, at 3 p.m. EST.
For more information, visit
http://www.nsf.gov/events/event_summ.jsp?cntn_id=129439&WT.mc_id=USNSF_13&WT.mc_ev=click.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to DRLAISL@nsf.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Green Strides Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Education presents the Green Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from various federal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled throughout the 2013-2014 school year.
The next webinar takes place on Dec. 4, 2013, at 3 p.m. EST.
For more information and registration, visit
http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/green-strides/webinar.html.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to
Green.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2014-15 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship
Applications are currently available for the 2014-15 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program. This program is open to current public or private elementary and secondary mathematics, technology, engineering and science classroom teachers with demonstrated excellence in teaching. Applications are due 5 p.m. EST Dec. 4, 2013.
Selected teachers spend a school year in Washington, D.C., sharing their expertise with policy makers and program managers. Einstein Fellows may serve with one of several government agency sponsors, such as the Department of Energy, NASA or the National Science Foundation.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens and be currently employed full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching in a STEM field full time for at least five of the last seven years.
For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit
http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.
Inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program should be directed to Brian O’Donnell at sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NES Web Seminar — Geometry: Space Math Problems — Solar Storms
As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar on Dec. 4, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. EST. Solar Storms provides teachers with a unique opportunity to have students use their knowledge of geometry and trigonometry to analyze NASA images of a solar tsunami. During this seminar, you will get an overview of the problem sets, preview a video about solar storms, suggestions for implementing best practices and learn about some extension activities.
Participants will receive an overview of the problem set and learn how the problems align to the Common Core State Standards.
This web seminar will be repeated on March 26, 2014.

For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar18.aspx.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visithttp://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity toNASA.Explorer.Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Reduced Gravity Education Flight Opportunity for Students at Minority Serving Institutions

NASA is offering undergraduate students from minority serving institutions an opportunity to test experiments in microgravity aboard NASA’s reduced gravity aircraft.
This opportunity is a partnership between the Minority University Research and Education Program and NASA’s Reduced Gravity Education Flight Program, which gives aspiring explorers a chance to propose, design and fabricate a reduced-gravity experiment. Selected teams will test and evaluate their experiments aboard NASA’s reduced-gravity airplane. The aircraft flies about 30 roller-coaster-like climbs and dips during experiment flights to produce periods of weightlessness and hypergravity ranging from 0 gravity, or g, to 2 g.
Proposals are due Dec. 4, 2013.
All applicants must be full-time undergraduate students, U.S. citizens and at least 18 years old.
For more information, visit https://microgravityuniversity.jsc.nasa.gov/murep/.
Questions about this opportunity should be emailed to jsc-reducedgravity@nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NES Web Seminar –Temperature and Earth Climate: Modeling Hot and Cold Planets
As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, the NASA Explorer Schools project is hosting a 90-minute Web seminar on Dec. 5, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST. Use NASA mission data collected from NASA satellites to see how a planet’s climate is determined. Attend this session and discover how you can incorporate authentic NASA data into your classroom to provide a real-world connection for your students.
This is the only time this seminar will be offered during the current school year.
The featured activity provides an opportunity for incorporating national science, technology and mathematics learning standards into curricula as well as addressing high school Next Generation Science Standards.
For more information and to register online, visit
http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar29.aspx.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit
http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity to NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Curious about our nearest star, water on Mars, the first trip to Pluto and other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. ET and is followed by a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take place at 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 7, 2013 — Oh, Swear Not by the Inconstant Sun
For 50 years, the Smithsonian monitored changes in the sun’s power. Secretary Charles Greeley Abbott asserted that solar variations could influence weather patterns and crop yields. What was he detecting? Dr. David DeVorkin will explore the inconstant nature of the sun.
Dec. 14, 2013 — First Mission to Pluto: The Origins and Voyage of New Horizons
In July 2015, New Horizons will become the first spacecraft to fly through the Pluto system. Dr. Michael Neufeld will discuss the goal of this mission and the promise of new science from it.
For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visit
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.
Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.
The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is made possible by a grant from NASA.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2014 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2014 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.
The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to Johnson Space Center for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the mission control team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks that include sample collection and acquisition. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboard sensors.
Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed project by Dec. 8, 2013. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select as many as eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2014.
The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.
For more information about this competition, visit
http://www.nianet.org/RoboOps.
If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees atstacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MAVEN Workshop — Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore!
The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission will explore the planet’s upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the solar wind. Set to arrive at Mars in 2014, the mission will provide invaluable insights into the history of Mars’ atmosphere and climate, liquid water and planetary habitability.
Join the MAVEN education team for a one-day workshop on the MAVEN mission, and the accompanying elementary program, Red Planet: Read, Write, Explore! This program features six standards-based lessons that combine science, literacy and art to help students understand planetary habitability and the MAVEN mission. The workshop will introduce participants to these lessons and concepts. The workshop will also have a session devoted to Spanish speaking English Language Learner and English as a Second Language students. Attendees will receive free classroom materials.
The workshop will take place on Jan. 25, 2014, in Houston, Texas. Registration is $15 and includes a continental breakfast and lunch. Applications are due Jan. 17, 2014, but space is limited so interested educators are encouraged to apply early.
For more information about the workshop and to apply online, visit
http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/education-outreach/for-educators/red-planet/houston-workshop/.
Please email any questions about this opportunity toepomail@lasp.colorado.edu.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2014 NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars Program
The NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars, or CAS, is accepting applications for its spring 2014 workshop. CAS is an interactive online learning experience for community college students in Texas.
CAS students participate in graded Web-based modules. Based on grades and completed applications, qualified students are chosen to attend a three-day experience at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston in spring 2014.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens, residents of Texas and have access to the Internet.
Applications are due Jan. 21, 2014.
For more information and to apply online, visit
http://cas.aerospacescholars.org/.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to jsc-ae-cas@mail.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP, 2014. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.
The program takes place in summer 2014. Preparatory information and data analysis will take place at the University of California, Irvine. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif.
Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Round-trip travel to California, housing and transportation will be provided.
The deadline for applications is Feb. 7, 2014.
For more information and to download the program application, visit
http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2014.
Specific questions about the program should be directed to
SARP2014@nserc.und.edu.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA Exploration Design Challenge
Students from Kindergarten through 12th grade will have the opportunity to play a unique role in the future of human spaceflight through participation in NASA’s Exploration Design Challenge, or EDC. NASA EDC invites students around the world to think and act like scientists in order to overcome one of the major hurdles of deep space long-duration exploration — the dangers associated with space radiation. Students taking part in the challenge will discover how to plan and design improved radiation shielding aboard the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, currently being developed by NASA, Lockheed Martin and other partners to carry astronauts to space, venturing farther than humans have ever gone before.
Through a series of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, engagement activities, students in grades K-8 will analyze different materials that simulate space radiation shielding and recommend materials that best block radiation and protect astronauts. Students in grades 9-12 will think and act like engineers as they apply what they learn to design shielding to protect a sensor on the Orion crew module from space radiation. After a review of the design solutions submitted by teams in the grades 9-12 challenge, five finalist teams will be selected and matched with a mentor from NASA to test their designs in a virtual simulator. The winning team will build a prototype radiation shield that will be analyzed and submitted to Lockheed Martin for flight certification on the inaugural flight of the Orion Exploration Flight Test, or EFT-1.
The five U.S. finalist teams from the grades 9-12 challenge will be invited to attend the EFT-1 launch, currently scheduled for November 2014. The names of all students, grades K-12, participating in the NASA EDC will fly aboard the spacecraft as honorary virtual crewmembers for Orion’s first flight. The deadline to register students for the virtual crew is July 31, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/spacelife/explorationdesign/overview/index.html.
For more information about Orion, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion.
Email any questions about this opportunity to nasaedc@nianet.org.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

New NASA eClips Videos Segments on the SMAP Mission Available

This month, NASA eClips™ presents:
— Our World: What is Soil? (Grades K-5)
Learn about soil and how different kinds of soil hold moisture. See how NASA plans to use measurements from the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission, or SMAP, to make our world a better place to live.
— Real World: What is Soil Moisture? (Grades 6-8)
What is the connection between water, soil and carbon cycles? The answer may be in the soil beneath your feet. See how NASA plans to measure soil moisture from space with the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission, or SMAP. Learn to calculate soil moisture in your own backyard and discover the real world applications for this data.
— Launchpad: Space Age Technologies Measure Soil (Grades 9-12)
Learn how NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission, or SMAP, will use new technologies to help answer questions raised in the National Research Councils’ Decadal Survey. See what kind of modeling and forecasting applications the data from this mission will provide as it measures the soil moisture that cools Earth’s surface and provides water to the atmosphere and plants.

[ECP] K12 Newsletters : NASA Education Opportunities

Free Education Webinar Series from the Aerospace Education Services Project
The Aerospace Education Services Project is presenting a series of free webinars throughout September 2013. All webinars can be accessed online. Join aerospace education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.
Here an Earth, There an Earth, Everywhere an Earth: The Kepler Telescope’s Search for Habitable Planets Beyond Our Solar System (Grades 6-12)
Sept. 19, 2013,
at 7 – 8 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Steve Culivan will discuss NASA’s Kepler telescope and its search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars. Participants will learn how to use Johannes Kepler’s Third Law and actual Kepler telescope data to construct graphs to record and interpret data that determine if a planet orbiting a star in another solar system is a possible candidate to support life.
Applying the Engineering Design Process to STEM Content (Grades 3-8)
Sept. 23, 2013, at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Join aerospace education specialist John Weis as he discusses ways to modify lessons to teach the engineering process while still covering required content. Upon completion, participants will be able to modify lessons and units to incorporate engineering design into any science, technology, engineering and mathematics subject as recommended in the Common Core standards.
Weather and Climate Introduction (Grades 3-8)
Sept. 24, 2013,
at 4 – 5 p.m. EDT
Aerospace education specialist Marilé Colón Robles will discuss the differences in scope between weather and climate. Participants will gain a better understanding of the components of weather that are measured and how long-term weather measurement relates to climate change.
For more information about these webinars, and to see a full list of webinars taking place through September 2013, visit http://aesp.psu.edu/programs/webinars/.
Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Chris Gamrat at gamrat@psu.edu.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Teach for America Event With STEM BrainTrust

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network, or DLN, for a live education webcast event on Sept. 20, 2013, from 9 a.m. – Noon EDT. Learn more about how to close the achievement gap and strengthen the workforce through Teach for America’s partnership with STEM BrainTrust, which encourages students of color to strive for STEM jobs.
This event is in support of Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson and the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, both advocates for Teach for America. As a national nonprofit dedicated to confronting the educational inequity in this country, Teach For America sees the value of embedding itself in communities of color, where the disparities disproportionately have had the greatest negative impact, to let those communities know that we want to work with them in a holistic way to address needs to employ people of color in STEM fields.
NASA’s DLN will webcast this event on location, enabling viewers to watch as students make presentations about their experiences and to hear various speakers address the issues of opportunities of employment in STEM fields.
To view a live webcast of the event, visit http://dln.nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Centaur Design Challenge
Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Centaur rocket with an educational engineering design challenge featuring key elements of the rocket’s capabilities. Dubbed “America’s Workhorse in Space,” the Centaur rocket has been used for more than 200 unmanned missions.
NASA’s Glenn Research Center’s Educational Programs Office is challenging teams of 7th- through 9th-grade students in the Cleveland, Ohio, area to design an air-propelled vehicle with a 25-gram payload that will travel along the ground from a launch site to a rendezvous point with a required mid-course correction.
An educator professional development session will be held on Sept. 24, 2013, to discuss the challenge and for participants to discover how to implement the challenge in their classrooms. Registration for the session closes on Sept. 20, 2013.
Registration for the design challenge opens on Oct. 1, 2013, and runs through Nov. 1, 2013.
On Nov. 22, 2013, NASA’s Glenn Research Center will host a Student Design Challenge Event. During this event, students will represent their schools and present their solutions to a panel of NASA judges. Prizes will be awarded to top-scoring teams.
To learn more about the challenge, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/centaur-design-challenge.
Please email any questions about this challenge to Angela Surgenor at Angela.D.Surgenor@nasa.gov.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Heritage Family Day Events at Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum
The 2013 Heritage Family Day event series celebrates the diverse ethnic and cultural communities that have contributed to aviation and space exploration. Events will commemorate historic and current contributions through presentations and activities for the entire family. The events will take place at the Smithsonian’s Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., and at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. The events are free and open to the public.
Hispanic Heritage Month: Innovators in Air and Space
Sept. 21, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EDT
Celebrate Latin America’s historical contributions to aviation and space exploration. Meet current Hispanic scientists and engineers through the Smithsonian Latinos in STEM initiative. Listen to bilingual stories and participate in hands-on activities.
http://airandspace.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=4837
To see a list of all upcoming Heritage Family Days events, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/heritage-days/.
Questions about this series of events should be directed to the Visitor Service line at 202-633-1000.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Green Strides Webinar Series
The U.S. Department of Education presents the Green Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from various federal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled throughout the 2013-2014 school year.
The next webinar takes place on Sept. 25, 2013, at 3 p.m. EDT.
For more information and registration, visit http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/green-strides/webinar.html.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Green.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NES Web Seminar — Algebraic Equations: Transit Tracks — Finding Habitable Planets

As part of a series of electronic professional development experiences for educators, NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Sept. 25, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EDT.
Seminar participants will receive an in-depth view of the featured student activity, “Finding Habitable Planets.” In this engaging activity, students analyze NASA’s Kepler Mission light curve data on planetary systems and determine the orbital period, orbital radius, size and habitability of a planet. The seminar includes a description of how the activity addresses Earth’s place in the universe performance expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and the lesson’s alignment to the high school Common Core Mathematics Standards for functions and equations.
For more information and to register online, visit http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar2.aspx.
This seminar will be repeated on Dec. 18, 2013.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity to the NES Help Desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@nasa.gov.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Earthzine Essay Contest: Science Technology for Observing Earth’s Climate

Earthzine invites undergraduate and graduate students from around the world to submit an essay to its 2013 Student Essay Contest on “Science Technology for Observing Earth’s Climate.” The 2013 Student Essay Contest is a platform to share views on earth science technology, which includes hardware for data collection, computer infrastructures for data management and software and algorithms for data analysis.
Accepted essays will be published at http://www.Earthzine.org and judged by a panel of experts. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top entries.
Essays should not exceed 1000 words, and must include at least one image with caption and credit information. The author must have the rights or permission to use the image.
Submissions are due Sept. 26, 2013. Winners will be announced on Oct.18, 2013.
For more information, visit http://www.earthzine.org/2013/07/02/earthzine-seeks-student-essays-on-science-technology-for-observing-earths-climate-for-international-contest/.
Please email any questions about this contest to Barbara Hofer at bhofer@earthzine.org.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Radio Astronomy in the Classroom

Join NASA’s Dr. Steve Levin, project scientist for the Juno mission to Jupiter, for a live interactive education event on Sept. 27, 2013, at 1 p.m. EDT. Levin will share information about the Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope program and how students can participate in real research using a 34-meter radio telescope. Students and teachers who have participated in the program also will take part in the discussion.
If your class is interested in participating in this event via live video conferencing, contact Lyle Tavernier at lyle.tavernier@jpl.nasa.gov.
To view a live webcast of the event and submit questions via email, visit http://dln.nasa.gov.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

REGISTRATION EXTENDED: Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2013

The Zero Robotics High School Tournament 2013 offers high school students the opportunity to design experiments that will be tested in space.
Zero Robotics challenges high school student teams to write their own algorithms to fly the Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES. The competition starts online where teams compete to solve an annual challenge guided by mentors. Students can create, edit, share, save, simulate and submit code, all from a Web browser. After several phases of virtual competition, finalists are selected to compete in a live championship aboard the International Space Station!
A limited number of mini-grants are available to new teams that join and to existing teams that recruit new teams. Sign up for this opportunity when you register your team.
Teams may register now:
1) Go to http://www.zerorobotics.org.
2) Log in or create an account. (Note: You can start programming in the online integrated development environment at this point!)
3) Click Tournaments and register for the High School Tournament 2013.
4) Create a team and invite other users.
5) Visit Resources to get started.
The practice round of the competition is underway! Registration remains open through Sept. 27, 2013.All teams must submit code to the practice competition by Sept 29, 2013,. to continue.
Zero Robotics is organized by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Space Systems Laboratory, Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and TopCoder, and is sponsored by The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, NASA and the Center for Advancement of Science in Space.
Please email any questions about this opportunity to zerorobotics@mit.edu.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mars Educator Conference at Arizona State University

Are you looking for ideas on how to transform your classroom to align with Common Core and the Next Gen Science Standards? Are you curious about how NASA themes can fit into your curriculum and help you meet these new expectations? To find out, join the Arizona State University Mars Education Program for the “Transforming Your Classroom: Red Planet Resources and Lessons Aligned to Common Core and Next Gen Science Standards” conference.
During the conference, Mars geologist Dr. Phil Christensen will share the latest news from the current missions exploring the Red Planet. Join our education experts as they showcase NASA’s Mars lessons that are newly and fully aligned to Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards and the 21st Century Skills and find out how to teach this content thematically in your classroom.
The conference will take place on Sept. 28, 2013, at the Arizona State University main campus in Tempe, Ariz.
The conference is free, but registration is required. A certificate for 6.5 hours of professional development will be given for this conference. Participants will receive lesson plans, NASA materials and other resources.
For more information and to register for the conference, visit http://marsed.asu.edu/transforming_your_classroom_registration.
Questions about the conference should be directed to marsed@asu.edu.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Solar System Ambassadors Program Accepting Applications

The NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Solar System Ambassadors, or SSA, Program, a nationwide network of space enthusiast volunteers, will accept applications from Sept. 1 through Sept. 30, 2012.
Highly motivated individuals will be given the opportunity to represent NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory as volunteer Solar System Ambassadors to the public for a one-year, renewable term beginning Jan. 1, 2014.
While applications are being sought nationwide, interested parties from the following states are especially encouraged to apply: Alaska, Delaware, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, West Virginia, Wyoming and the District of Columbia. SSA hopes to add 100 new volunteers to the program in 2014.
To learn more about the Solar System Ambassador Program and to apply online, visit http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/. The Announcement of Opportunity and application form will be available beginning Sept. 1, 2013.
If you have questions about this opportunity, contact Kay Ferrari, SSA Coordinator, by email at ambassad@jpl.nasa.gov.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Robert Noyce Fellowship in Informal STEM Learning
Applications are being accepted for the Robert Noyce Fellowship in Informal Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, or STEM, Learning. This two-year fellowship at the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Innovation and Improvement will begin in fall 2013.
Candidates for the fellowship should have substantial experience in the field of informal and out-of-school time STEM learning. This can include academic work, as well as expertise gained through direct work with afterschool programs, K-12 schools, museums, libraries, foundations, companies and others that are involved in STEM education. A strong network within informal STEM learning is essential. Familiarity with federal education policy and the ability to build strong partnerships inside and outside government are also desired.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens. An undergraduate degree is required, and a graduate degree is strongly preferred.
Applications are due Oct. 1, 2013.
For more information about this fellowship opportunity or to submit a resume, please contact Sara Spiegel at sara@noycefdn.org.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

OSSI — Spring 2014 Opportunities

The NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative, or OSSI, strives to provide students at all institutions of higher education access to a portfolio of internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities offered by NASA mission directorates and centers.
Visit the Office of Education Infrastructure Division LaunchPad to find information on internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities. The site features the OSSI online application for recruiting NASA Interns, Fellows and Scholars, or NIFS. This innovative system allows students to search and apply for all types of higher-education NASA internship, fellowship and scholarship opportunities in one location. A single application places the student in the applicant pool for consideration by all NASA mentors.
Applications for spring 2014 opportunities are due Oct. 11, 2013.
To find available opportunities and to fill out an OSSI online application for recruiting NIFS, visit https://intern.nasa.gov.
Inquiries about the OSSI should be submitted via https://intern.nasa.gov/oic/.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2014 GLOBE Calendar Art Competition

The Global Learning and Observation to Benefit the Environment, or GLOBE, Program is sponsoring an international art competition to encourage students to highlight and document GLOBE communities around the world. GLOBE is asking students to draw, paint or show via some other artistic medium how their local community is unique. Do not send photographs, please!
The GLOBE calendar is viewed by students, teachers, scientists and community members from around the world. This is an opportunity for students to show off their local environment!
Winning entries will be featured in the 2014 GLOBE calendar. All participants will receive a calendar.
Entries are due Oct. 15, 2013. For full contest details and rules, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/scrc/overview/competitions/calendar-competition-2014-calendar/.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed to science@globe.gov.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Celebrate Solar Week — Fall 2013
Solar Week, Oct. 21-25, 2013, provides a weeklong series of Web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. Students in upper elementary, middle and high school students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons.
Solar Week is ideal for students studying the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Many lessons are suitable for fun computer lab activities as well. After doing the activities, students can interact on the bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research. Solar Week is great for learning about our nearest star, the sun.
To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.
Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Science Foundation — East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes

The National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, program provides U.S. graduate students an opportunity to spend eight weeks (10 weeks for Japan) during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific: Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between the National Science Foundation and counterpart agencies in each host location.
EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master’s or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a field of science, engineering or STEM education supported by NSF, including Engineering; Computer and Information Science and Engineering; Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Biological Sciences; Geosciences; Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences; Education (STEM); and Multidisciplinary Research in these fields.
The National Science Foundation provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. Our foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations (arrangements vary by host location).
The application submission deadline for summer 2014 institutes is Nov. 25, 2013.
For additional information, visit http://www.nsf.gov/eapsi.
Please email any questions about this opportunity to oiia-ise-eapsi@nsf.gov.

NASA confirms Voyager 1 has left the solar system

NASA confirms Voyager 1 has left the solar system

http://www.latimes.com/la-sci-sn-nasa-confirms-voyager-1-has-exited-the-solar-system-20130912,0,6990209.story
By Monte Morin
September 12, 2013, 11:00 a.m.
After 36 years of space travel and months of heated debate among scientists, NASA confirmed Thursday that Voyager 1 has indeed left our solar system and had entered interstellar space more than a year ago. “Voyager has boldly gone where no probe has gone before, marking one of the most significant technological achievements in the annals of the history of science,” said John Grunsfeld, NASA’s associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate.
At a Thursday news conference in Washington, D.C., officials said the belated confirmation was based on new “key” evidence involving space plasma density. The evidence was outlined in a paper published online Thursday in the journal Science. Lead author Don Gurnett, an Iowa State plasma physicist and a Voyager project scientist, said the data showed conclusively that Voyager 1 had exited the heliopause — the bubble of hot, energetic particles that surrounds our sun and planets — and entered into a region of cold, dark space called the interstellar medium.
“When we got that data, I and my colleagues just looked at each other and said, ‘We’re in the interstellar medium.’ It was just that clear to us,” Gurnett said. Gurnett calculated that Voyager crossed the edge of the heliosphere, or heliopause, at or around Aug. 25, 2012. “Even though it took 36 years, it’s just an amazing thing to me,” said study coauthor Bill Kurth, a radio and plasma researcher at the University of Iowa.
wide V shape. The antennas, which are connected to a radio transmitter, detect the oscillation, or vibration, of excited plasma particles. The device will convert the oscillations into an audible noise that is recorded on Voyager’s vintage eight-track tape recorder.
The frequency of the noise is associated with a specific density of plasma. The higher the frequency, the denser the plasma.
The only trouble is that something has to excite the plasma for it to “ring,” something like a large solar flare. Waiting for a solar flare can take years during a solar minimum (a period of low solar activity).
<SNIP>