cyberplayground

1958 National Defense Education Act, PL85-864 (graduate fellowship program and the National Defense Student Loan Program (NDSL), the precursor to the Perkins Loan Program, first Federal student aid program for low-income students)
http://nndb.com/
Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act
Carl Dewey Perkins (October 15, 1912 – August 3, 1984, a Democrat, was a politician and member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Kentucky.
Perkins, Carl Dewey (1912-1984) — also known as Carl D. Perkins — of Hindman, Knott County, Ky. Born in Hindman, Knott County, Ky., October 15, 1912. Democrat. Lawyer; member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1940; served in the U.S. Army during World War II; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1949-84; died in office 1984. Member, American Legion; Freemasons. Died in Lexington, Fayette County, Ky., August 3, 1984 (age 71 years, 293 days). Interment at Perkins Cemetery, Leburn, Ky.
Relatives: Father of Carl Christopher Perkins (1954-).
http://www.nndb.com/people/288/000129898/
Perkins, Carl Christopher (b. 1954) — also known as Carl C. Perkins;
Chris Perkins — of Leburn, Knott County, Ky. Born in Washington, D.C., August 6, 1954. Democrat. Member of Kentucky state house of representatives, 1981-84; U.S. Representative from Kentucky 7th District, 1985-93; minister. Baptist; later Presbyterian. Pleaded guilty in 1994 to bank fraud in connection with the House banking scandal; he wrote overdrafts totaling about $300,000 (covered by the House bank) and made false statements to obtain loans from commercial banks; also pleaded guilty to charges of filing false statements with the Federal Election Commission and false financial disclosure reports. Sentenced to 21 months in prison. In March 2000, pleaded guilty to criminal contempt of court for lying to a federal probation officer about his income. Still living as of 2013.
http://politicalgraveyard.com/bio/perkins.html
1986 Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (added Congressional Methodology as a second federal need analysis methodology, gave financial aid administrators broad discretion through “professional judgment”, required financial need for the GSL interest subsidy, NDSL renamed Perkins Loan, created Supplemental Loan to Students (SLS) for graduate, professional and independent students, restricted PLUS loans to parent borrowers, added FFEL consolidation loans)
http://www.finaid.org/educators/history.phtml
A History of Vocational and Career Education in Ohio: 1828-2000
http://www.scribd.com/doc/85309209/A-History-of-Vocational-and-Career-Education-in-Ohio-1828-2000
iUniverse, Inc. New York Lincoln Shanghai
To fulfill an eligibility requirement of the Carl Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act, an assessment was conducted of the public vocational … Carl D Perkins Voc and Appl Techn Educ Act 1990
http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED330816
The Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act was first authorized by the federal government in 1984 and reauthorized in 1998. Named for Carl D. Perkins, the act aims to increase the quality of technical education within the United States in order to help the economy.
On August 12, 2006 President George W Bush signed into law the reauthorization of the Act of 1998. The new law, the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006, was passed almost unanimously by Congress in late July, 2006.
The new law includes three major areas of revision:
1) Using the term “career and technical education” instead of “vocational education”
2) Maintaining the Tech Prep program as a separate federal funding stream within the legislation
3) Maintaining state administrative funding at 5 percent of a state’s allocation
The new law also includes new requirements for “programs of study” that link academic and technical content across secondary and postsecondary education, and strengthened local accountability provisions that will ensure continuous program improvement.
The Perkins Act provides almost $1.3 billion in federal support for career and technical education programs in all 50 States, including support for integrated career pathways programs.
http://www2.ed.gov/policy/sectech/leg/perkins/index.html
http://www.clasp.org/ a national picture of infant-toddler child care policies and finds that, collectively, states could be doing far better meeting the needs of our youngest children and their families
Corilie Perkins
http://web.archive.org/web/20100305131140/http://www.citizendia.org/Episcopal_Church_in_the_United_States_of_America

Dept. of Ed Funding Opportunities

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
 
The Department is currently seeking applications for the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program, the Advanced Placement (AP) Test Fee Program, and the Turnaround School Leaders Program.  The school counseling program provides funding to districts to establish or expand school counseling programs, with special consideration given to applicants that can: demonstrate the greatest need for counseling services in the schools to be served; propose most innovative and promising approaches; and show the greatest potential for replication and dissemination.  Applications are due April 28.  The test fee program awards grants to states to enable them to pay all or a portion of AP test fees on behalf of low-income students.  Applications are due May 8.  The school leadership program supports projects to develop and implement or enhance and implement a critical leadership pipeline that selects, prepares, places, supports, and retains school leaders for School Improvement Grant (SIG) schools or SIG-eligible schools.  Applications are due May 23.
 
Moreover, for the current fiscal year, the Department’s Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII) is conducting13 grant competitions across five program areas: Arts in Education, Charter Schools, Investing in Innovation (i3), Full-Service Community Schools, and Teacher Quality Partnerships.  Four of the competitions are already underway.  Announcements of the other competitions are slated for later this spring.
 
Also, be sure to review the Department’s FY 2014 Grants Forecast (as of March 31), which lists virtually all programs and competitions under which the agency has invited or expects to invite applications for awards and provides actual or estimated dates for the transmittal of applications under these programs. (Note: This document is advisory only and not an official application notice of the Department of Education.)

Skills for the New Economy: Preparing Students for College and Careers

Skills for the New Economy: Preparing Students for College and Careers
http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/budget15/crosscuttingissues/skillsforneweconomy.pdf
 
RETHINKING HIGH SCHOOL
 
On April 7, during his visit to Bladensburg High School in Prince George’s County, Maryland, President Obama announced 24 Youth CareerConnect grants, providing $107 million to local partnerships of school districts, institutions of higher education, workforce investment boards, and employers as they redesign the teaching and learning experience for youth to more fully prepare them with the knowledge, skills, and industry-relevant education needed to get on the pathway to a successful career, including postsecondary education or registered apprenticeship.  “We challenged America’s high schools to…say what they can do to make sure their students learn the skills that businesses are looking for in high-demand fields,” the President said.  “And we asked high schools to develop partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on real life applications for the fields of the future — fields like science and technology and engineering and math….  The winners across the board are doing the kinds of things that will allow other schools to start duplicating what they’re doing…. And that’s what we want for all the young people here.  We want an education that engages you…that equips you with the rigorous and relevant skills for college and for a career” (blog post, with remarks and video).
 
The Youth CareerConnect program was established this year by the Labor Department, in collaboration with the Education Department, using one-time revenues from the H-1B visa program.  Grants range from $2.2 million to $7 million.  The program wholly complements additional proposals in the President’s Fiscal Year 2015 budget to ensure high school students graduate ready for college and career success and to help the U.S., once again, lead the world in college attainment.
 
Bladensburg High School was part of a three-school team from the county that won a $7 million grant.  It offers several career academies with high school curricula aligned with college-level entrance requirements for Maryland’s state university system.  Through a collaborative effort with local partners, it will expand the capacity of its Health and Biosciences Academy to better prepare more students for one of the region’s highest growth industries.  Students who concentrate in health professions will be able to earn industry-recognized certifications in the fields of nursing and pharmacy.  Biomedical students will be able to earn college credit from the University of Maryland at Baltimore County and the Rochester Institute of Technology.  All students will have access to individualized college and career counseling designed to improve preparation for college-level coursework and the attainment of industry-recognized credentials.  Students will also have the ability to receive postsecondary credit while still in high school and have access to paid work experiences with employer partners such as Lockheed Martin.  Overall, the grant will help prepare 2,500 graduates at Bladensburg and other schools across the county to succeed academically and graduate career-ready in the high-demand fields of health care and information technology.
 
On the same day, the Departments of Education and Labor launched the Registered Apprenticeship-College Consortium, a new effort that will allow graduates of registered apprenticeship programs to turn their years of rigorous on-the-job and classroom training into college credits toward an associate’s or bachelor’s degree.  Registered apprenticeship programs are sponsored by joint employer and labor groups, individual employers, or employer associations.  Currently, the registered apprenticeship system includes a network of more than 19,000 programs nationwide — offering nearly 1,000 different career opportunities.  Participating sponsors will have their programs evaluated by a third-party organization (for example, the American Council on Education or the National College Credit Recommendation Service) to determine the college credit value of the apprenticeship completion certificate.  Graduates will be able to earn up to 60 credits based on their apprenticeship experience.

The Folklore & Education Section now has it's Folklore & Education Newsletter

The Folklore & Education Section now has it’s Folklore & Education Newsletter

The Folklore and Education section produces an annual newsletter, awards the Dorothy Howard Folklore and Education Prize and the Robinson-Roeder-Ward Fellowship, works with partners in the field, and organizes sessions and events at the AFS annual meeting.   The Latest Edition of the Folklore and Education Section Newsletter is available online: Spring 2014 (pdf). (See below for the archive of newsletters dating from 2001.)
The Latest Edition of the Folklore and Education Section Newsletter is available online: Spring 2014 (pdf).
Gregory Hansen Editor
Rosemary Hathaway, the newsletter’s co-editor