The White House Blog and State of the Union

You’ve Never Seen a State of the Union Address Like This

This year we’re trying something new.
You’ve Never Seen a State of the Union Address Like This

As President Obama addresses the Nation, we’ll offer a companion stream of visual aids, including charts and quick stats about what’s happening in the country.  You can view this feature at

THE WHITE HOUSE BLOG
This morning, Senior Advisor to the President David Plouffe sent a reminder to the White House email to tune into President Obama’s State of the Union Address tonight and to watch the live Open for Questions event immediately following the speech.  Check out the email below, and if you didn’t get it, be sure you sign up for the White House email list.

Tonight at 9 p.m. EST, President Obama will deliver the State of the Union Address and outline his vision for putting aside the politics that divide us and moving forward to create jobs, up our game to out-compete in the global economy, and win the future for our children and our country.

This year we’re trying something new.
You’ve Never Seen a State of the Union Address Like This
As President Obama addresses the Nation, we’ll offer a companion stream of visual aids, including charts and quick stats about what’s happening in the country.  You can view this feature at WhiteHouse.gov/SOTU.
The State of the Union Address is a major undertaking here at the
White House. You can learn more about the history and the making of
this annual speech in our brand new “Inside the White House” video:
http://www.whitehouse.gov/Inside-SOTU
VIDEO
Immediately following the speech, stay tuned for our live Open for Questions event with policy experts from the White House answering your questions about key issues in the speech.
Watch the speech and submit your questions:
IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS
Following the President’s Address, senior White House officials will take your questions about issues covered in the speech live from the White House.
From: David Plouffe, The White House
The White House, Washington
Good morning,
Tonight at 9 p.m. EST, President Obama will deliver the State of the
Union Address and outline his vision for putting aside the politics that
divide us and moving forward to create jobs, up our game to out-compete
in the global economy, and win the future for our children and our country.
This year we’re trying something new. As President Obama addresses the
Nation, we’ll offer a companion stream of visual aids, including charts
and quick stats about what’s happening in the country. You can view
this feature at WhiteHouse.gov/SOTU
.
Immediately following the speech, stay tuned for our live Open for
Questions event with policy experts from the White House answering your
questions about key issues in the speech.
Watch the speech and submit your questions:
The State of the Union Address: Watch and Engage
Throughout the week, we’ll have plenty of ways for you to get involved
and ask questions of President Obama and other senior Administration
officials about the State of the Union Address. See a full line-up of
events and find out how to submit your questions:
http://www.WhiteHouse.gov/SOTU
Don’t forget to tune in tonight at 9 p.m. EST!
Sincerely,
David Plouffe
Senior Advisor to the President

One thought on “The White House Blog and State of the Union”

  1. January 23, 2011
    The Competition Myth
    By PAUL KRUGMAN
    Meet the new buzzword, same as the old buzzword. In advance of the State of the Union, President Obama has telegraphed his main theme: competitiveness. The President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board has been renamed the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. And in his Saturday radio address, the president declared that “We can out-compete any other nation on Earth.”
    This may be smart politics. Arguably, Mr. Obama has enlisted an old cliché on behalf of a good cause, as a way to sell a much-needed increase in public investment to a public thoroughly indoctrinated in the view that government spending is a bad thing.
    But let’s not kid ourselves: talking about “competitiveness” as a goal is fundamentally misleading. At best, it’s a misdiagnosis of our problems. At worst, it could lead to policies based on the false idea that what’s good for corporations is good for America.
    About that misdiagnosis: What sense does it make to view our current woes as stemming from lack of competitiveness?
    It’s true that we’d have more jobs if we exported more and imported less. But the same is true of Europe and Japan, which also have depressed economies. And we can’t all export more while importing less, unless we can find another planet to sell to. Yes, we could demand that China shrink its trade surplus — but if confronting China is what Mr. Obama is proposing, he should say that plainly.
    Furthermore, while America is running a trade deficit, this deficit is smaller than it was before the Great Recession began. It would help if we could make it smaller still. But ultimately, we’re in a mess because we had a financial crisis, not because American companies have lost their ability to compete with foreign rivals.
    But isn’t it at least somewhat useful to think of our nation as if it were America Inc., competing in the global marketplace? No.
    Consider: A corporate leader who increases profits by slashing his work force is thought to be successful. Well, that’s more or less what has happened in America recently: employment is way down, but profits are hitting new records. Who, exactly, considers this economic success?
    Still, you might say that talk of competitiveness helps Mr. Obama quiet claims that he’s anti-business. That’s fine, as long as he realizes that the interests of nominally “American” corporations and the interests of the nation, which were never the same, are now less aligned than ever before.
    Take the case of General Electric, whose chief executive, Jeffrey Immelt, has just been appointed to head that renamed advisory board. I have nothing against either G.E. or Mr. Immelt. But with fewer than half its workers based in the United States and less than half its revenues coming from U.S. operations, G.E.’s fortunes have very little to do with U.S. prosperity.
    [snip]

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