In Pennsylvania School Districts Stockpiling Huge budget surplus accounts, while still raising property taxes every year

In Pennsylvania School Districts Stockpiling Huge budget surplus accounts, while still raising property taxes every year

School Districts Stockpiling Huge budget surplus accounts, while still raising property taxes every year Above Act 1 Index (2008-18) http://haverford.k12.pa.us Springfield SD Delaware Delaware 9 REQUESTS $10,031,384 Haverford Township SD Delaware 8 REQUESTS $10,968,904

NBC10 INVESTIGATES OUR REAL ESTATE SCHOOL TAXES

or

AN ALGORHYTHM DOESN’T CHECK TO KNOW HOW MANY YEARS IN A ROW THE SUPERINTENDENT RAISED OUR TAXES

THE ALGORHYTHM DOESN’T KNOW HOW MUCH THEY ARE HOARDING AWAY IN A BANK ACCOUNT

YOU CAN’T KNOW OR FIND OUT

THERE IS NO ACCOUNTABILITY OR TRANSPARENCY

Superintendent certifies accuracy of data
No one sees the Data submitted by the Superintendent.
They are never audited  – no one looks
Tax payers never know what us going on
Nobody checks what the superintendent asks for or the accuracy of the data
Tax payers dont know what the superintendant is asking for no penalty for wrong data bad data we want public data frOm superintendent
Citizens need to rely on the School board  to fix It. They want the money to pay for Charter and Online Schools.

School Districts Stockpiling Huge ‘Rainy Day’ Funds

Some school districts in the Philadelphia suburbs and Lehigh Valley have amassed large “rainy day” funds, or budget surplus accounts, while still raising property taxes every year

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/investigations/School-Districts-Stockpiling-Huge-_Rainy-Day_-Funds_Philadelphia-509550082.html

School Districts Stockpiling Huge budget surplus accounts, while still raising property taxes every year Above Act 1 Index (2008-18)

1) Delaware School district needs to get permission to raise taxes from the state Dept of Education
2) When the Superintendent says they need more money they automatically get permission and our taxes are raised.
3) There is no audit of any data given to justify the increase in the tax request by the state or school board or anyone on the planet.

HAVERFORD Township SD MADE 8 REQUESTS $10,968,904

THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF HAVERFORD TOWNSHIP
Maureen Reusche @MaureenReusche
https://twitter.com/MaureenReusche

Dr. Maureen Reusche, Superintendent of the School District of Haverford Township
50 East Eagle Road
Havertown, PA 19083
610-853-5900
https://twitter.com/MaureenReusche
https://twitter.com/haverfordsd

Superintendent SDHT
https://mobile.twitter.com/PSBAAdvocacyAm1

Benjamin T. Hanft
Chief Division of Subsidy Data and Administration
runs Department of education  subsidy data and  administration division
ra-CAD@pa.gov or (717) 787-5423 option 1
Division of Subsidy Administration
Bureau of Budget and Fiscal Management
Pennsylvania Department of Education
https://www.education.pa.gov/Teachers%20-%20Administrators/School%20Finances/Pages/Contact.aspx
Bureau of Budget and Fiscal Management
333 Market Street | Harrisburg, PA 17126 |
717.787.5423 | www.education.pa.gov

A statement containing specific, collection-based data elements that must be verified and signed by the statewide, longitudinal data system that manages, analyzes, disaggregates, and uses individual student data for each student served by Pennsylvania’s Pre-K through grade 12 public education system</p>” data-tiptheme=”tipthemeflatdarklight” data-tipdelayclose=”500″ data-tipeventout=”mouseout” data-tipmouseleave=”false”>PIMS Administrator, data administrator, and Chief School Officer of a Local Education Agency (LEA) before being sent to the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). http://dataqualitynetwork.net/index.php?option=com_seoglossary&view=glossary&catid=1&id=97

School districts Data
https://www.education.pa.gov/Pages/Right-To-Know.aspx

Right to Know Law Policy, Pennsylvania Department of Education
the Department of General Services publishes many solicitations, awards and contracts on its website at http://www.emarketplace.state.pa.us/
Uploads of contracts to the Department of Treasury website, pursuant to the requirements of Chapter 17 of the RTKL, 65 P.S.§§67.1701-1702, may be found at http://www.patreasury.gov/newsMediaRTK.html

role=”link” href=”https://mobile.twitter.com/hashtag/ADVOCATE4PublicEd?src=hashtag_click” data-focusable=”true”>#ADVOCATE4PublicEd

Retweeted Haverford SD @haverfordsd

Republicans move expanded private school tax credits through Pa. state House https://twitter.com/WTAE – https://twitter.com/AP” data-mentioned-user-id=”51241574″@AP #HB800

In 2016-17, taxpayers in House Ed Committee member .@RepBrownPA Rosemary Brown’s school districts in Monroe and Pike Counties had to send over $14.5 million to chronically underperforming cybers that they never authorized. #SB34 (Schwank) or #HB526 (Sonney) could change that.

House passes $100 million expansion of private school scholarship tax credit

https://www.wtae.com/article/republicans-move-expanded-private-school-tax-credits-through-pa-state-house/27396655

PA House just voted to nearly double EITC funding for private and religious schools to $100M with a 10% annual escalator.

Hopefully the legislators who supported this proposal will also support major investments in our public schools & public school employees.

https://www.penncapital-star.com/education/eitc/

In 2016-17, taxpayers in House Ed Committee member

https://twitter.com/RepBrownPA @RepBrownPA Rosemary Brown’s school districts in Monroe and Pike Counties had to send over $14.5 million to chronically underperforming cybers that they never authorized. #SB34 (Schwank) or #HB526 (Sonney) could change that.

https://twitter.com/lfeinberg/status/1126126675580866561

The Haverford Township School District Education Foundation awarded a $20,000 grant for continued BASIS (Belonging and Sociocultural Identities in Schools) work in the district at the School Board Meeting. <href=”https://twitter.com/hashtag/HPride?src=hashtag_click” data-focusable=”true”>#HPride and <href=”https://mobile.twitter.com/hashtag/community?src=hashtag_click” data-focusable=”true”>#community

  • 10,000,000 plus hoard already
  • Why school taxes are so high?
  • Algorhythm school district superintendent certifies its accurate
  • No penalty if certification is wrong
  • School board has to fix the tax mistake

@mitchreports

 

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/investigations/NBC10-Investigators_-Tracking-Philly-City-Council_s-Multi-Million-Dollar-Money-Pot_Philadelphia-509602172.html

Above and Beyond: Exemptions to School Spending Limits School districts that have sought exemptions to limits on annual tax increases at least five of the last 10 years.
https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/investigations/Here-Are-Pennsylvania-School-Districts-Stockpiling-Cash-509535961.html

* Requests to Raise Taxes Above Act 1 Index (2008-18)

Springfield SD Delaware Delaware 9 REQUESTS $10,031,384
Haverford Township SD Delaware 8 REQUESTS $10,968,904
Marple Newtown SD Delaware 7 REQUESTS $13,003,380
Radnor Township SD Delaware 7 REQUESTS $19,186,506
Garnet Valley SD Delaware 6 REQUESTS $8,767,370
Upper Darby SD Delaware 5 REQUESTS $23,522,521
Wallingford-Swarthmore SD Delaware 5 REQUESTS $9,238,193

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/investigations/Here-Are-Pennsylvania-School-Districts-Stockpiling-Cash-509535961.html

NOTICES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Index Calculation Required by Special Session Act 1 of 2006 [48 Pa.B. 5748] [Saturday, September 15, 2018]
Under section 333(l) of the Taxpayer Relief (53 P.S. § 6926.333(l)), the Department of Education (Department) has calculated the index for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019-2020.
The index is the average of the percentage increase in the Statewide average weekly wage and the Employment Cost Index. For FY 2019-2020, the base index is 2.3%.
For school districts with a market value/income aid ratio greater than 0.4000, an adjusted index will be posted on the Department’s web site at www.education.pa.gov by September 30, 2018.
https://www.pabulletin.com/secure/data/vol48/48-37/1455.html

Delaware County School District has amassed a large budget surplus accounts, while still raising property taxes every year.

The state Department of Education sets an annual cap on the amount district can raise in new taxes, but their regulations can be circumvented by districts. Here’s how.

A list of school districts in the Philly burbs and Lehigh Valley that have most often sought state approval to circumvent limits on school tax increases.

“Pennsylvanians have the right to know if their school districts are holding millions in reserve while asking for even more of their hard-earned money,” Paul said. “It’s one thing for districts to plan responsibly for the future; it’s quite another to expect taxpayers to fund massive cash stockpiles that do little to educate students.”  Districts can apply for exemptions for three reasons: construction spending, pension liability and special education. According to state law, the districts then have to spend the money raised above the cap on those specific expenses. NBC10 was provided each district’s approved waiver applications by the Department of Education.

“Since Act 1’s passage, however, virtually no districts have sought voter approval,” the group said in a statement with its report, adding that legislation called SB 909, introduced by Sen. Donald White, would require voter permission for any tax increase. STILL IN THE Senate Appropriations Committee

The bill would require a referendum on all local proposed tax increases, regardless of the amount.

One in three districts in Pennsylvania received exemptions to raise property taxes above their state-mandated caps this year, according to documents provided to NBC10.com by the state DOE.

The number of districts that received approvals, 178 this year, has increased from 165 in 2014-2015 and 173 in 2015-2016, the documents show. It is unclear how many used the exemptions to raise taxes above their caps.

Lower Merion is one of the numerous districts to be allowed tax increases above the state cap each of the last three years, despite having more than $55 million in reserve funds.
In total, the state’s 500 districts had $4.3 billion in reserve accounts as of the 2014-2015 school year, according to analysis by the Commonwealth Foundation, a conservative think tank.  The group released a report Wednesday that found 46 districts, including Lower Merion and Springfield, have applied for and been granted cap exemptions in at least 8 of the last 10 years.

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Pennsylvanias-School-Tax-Limit-Simply-Ways-Around-It-396859121.html

https://www.education.pa.gov/Teachers%20-%20Administrators/Property%20Tax%20Relief/Pages/Property-Tax-Reduction-Allocations.aspx

 

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/investigations/Here-Are-Pennsylvania-School-Districts-Stockpiling-Cash-509535961.html

Since 2006, when state lawmakers adopted a law limiting local school taxes.

But some end-arounds still exist, giving local school boards the ability to go above the Index cap because of school construction projects, pension obligations and special education costs. Earlier this decade, the number of districts seeking exemptions to the cap rose. But the trend has taken a downward turn in recent years.

2019-2020 Fiscal Year
Pennsylvania will continue its broad-based property tax relief in 2019-20 based on Special Session Act 1 of 2006. As required by law, the Commonwealth’s Budget Secretary certified on April 15, 2019, that $620,500,000 in state-funded local tax relief will be available in 2019-20. When combined with the senior citizen Property Tax/Rent Rebate program, total state-funded property tax relief will be $766.8 million next year.

Each school district will determine the actual amount of property tax relief for each homestead and farmstead after determining its 2019-20 real estate tax rate. The files directly below include the total state-funded property tax relief that will be available for each school district, the number of approved homesteads and farmsteads as of May 1, and a property tax relief estimate for each homestead and farmstead property.
https://www.education.pa.gov/Teachers%20-%20Administrators/Property%20Tax%20Relief/Pages/Property-Tax-Reduction-Allocations.aspx

The Act 1 Index
https://www.education.pa.gov/Teachers%20-%20Administrators/Property%20Tax%20Relief/Pages/default.aspx

as it’s known, sets a cap on yearly increases.

PA Bulletin Notice Regarding 2019-20 Base Index
https://www.pabulletin.com/secure/data/vol48/48-37/1455.html

2019-20 School District Adjusted Index Listing Excel downloard
https://www.education.pa.gov/Documents/Teachers-Administrators/Property%20Tax%20Relief/SSAct1_AdjIndex_2019-20.xlsx

But some end-arounds still exist, giving local school boards the ability to go above the Index cap because of school construction projects, pension obligations and special education costs. Earlier this decade, the number of districts seeking exemptions to the cap rose.

AND SECURITY???? FORGET IT

When School Districts Buy From Amazon, Are They Getting the Best Deal? Maybe Not.

Among the concerns raised in the report, published by the nonprofit Institute for Local Self-Reliance, are that the company uses its dynamic pricing model in a large public-sector contract—and that, ultimately, school districts risk not getting the best prices and local competitors lose out on business.

First, a recap. In 2017, Amazon won a five-year public sector contract with U.S. Communities, a cooperative purchasing program for local governments and school districts, with the option to renew for three additional two year periods. The contract covers office and classroom supplies as well as library books, technology and more. The report authors write that U.S. Communities estimated that the contract’s value could be worth $5.5 billion over a potential 11-year period.

Typically, these contracts set fixed prices for hundreds of commonly-purchased items. Yet according to the report authors, the contract with Amazon does not guarantee prices for any items. Instead, it uses dynamic pricing, which is subject to change, and thus could end up costing school districts more in the long run.

WannaCry? Hundreds of US schools still haven’t patched servers
A dive into vulnerability data shows even big districts’ servers still offering up SMB v. 1.

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2019/05/two-years-after-wannacry-us-schools-still-vulnerable-to-eternalblue/

If you’re wondering why ransomware continues to be such a problem for state and local governments and other public institutions, all you have to do to get an answer is poke around the Internet a little. Publicly accessible security-scan data shows that many public organizations have failed to do more than put a bandage over long-standing system vulnerabilities that, if successfully exploited, could bring their operations to a standstill.

While the method by which RobbinHood ransomware infected the network of Baltimore City two weeks ago is still unknown, insiders within city government have pointed to the incomplete efforts by the Office of Information Technology to get a handle on the city’s tangle of software, aging servers, and wide-flung network infrastructure. Baltimore isn’t even the only city to have been hit by ransomware in the last month—Lynn, Massachusetts, and Cartersville, Georgia, both had electronic payment systems taken offline by ransomware this month. Greenville, North Carolina, was struck by the same RobbinHood ransomware affecting Baltimore in April.

But cities aren’t the only highly vulnerable targets to be found by would-be attackers. There are hundreds of thousands of Internet-connected Windows systems in the United States that still appear to be vulnerable to an exploit of Microsoft Windows’ Server Message Block version 1 (SMB v. 1) file sharing protocol, despite repeated public warnings to patch systems following the worldwide outbreak of the WannaCry cryptographic malware two years ago. And based on data from the Shodan search engine and other public sources, hundreds of them—if not thousands—are servers in use at US public school systems. Even in cases where Microsoft’s patch of SMB v. 1 has been applied, the protocol remains a potential security problem—one that some organizations can’t completely close because some vendors still require the protocol for applications such as networked copiers and scanners.

While conducting research as a follow-up to our coverage of Baltimore City’s ongoing ransomware attack, Ars discovered that neighboring Baltimore County’s public school system had eight publicly accessible servers that still were running in configurations that indicated they were vulnerable to EternalBlue, the Equation Group exploit exposed by Shadow Brokers in April 2017 and then used as part of the WannaCry malware a month later. The exploit is now packaged as part of multiple malware kits, according to security researchers.

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