The coming wireless spectrum apocalypse and how it hits you

TELCO why the largest wireless operators are spending millions of dollars each year in lobbying to make sure rules for new spectrum auctions are written in a way that favors their interests,

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57488596-94/the-coming-wireless-spectrum-apocalypse-and-how-it-hits-you/?tag=nl.e703

The coming wireless spectrum apocalypse and how it hits you

Small carriers are worried about getting snuffed by the deep pockets of AT&T and Verizon Wireless, and they want help. What judges and regulators decide to do could impact your wallet for years to come.
by Marguerite Reardon
August 13, 2012 12:01 AM PDT Follow @maggie_reardon
C Spire Wireless, a small, southern wireless provider formerly known as Cellular South, has an ambitious plan to build a fast, 4G LTE network to reach its 900,000 customers. To do it, C Spire bought $192 million worth of 700 MHz wireless spectrum, which is considered some of the most valuable wireless spectrum that’s still available because it can travel long distances and penetrate obstacles.
But there’s a problem. C Spire claims it hasn’t been able to use this spectrum and hasn’t been able to deploy its 4G network. It says the bigger carriers, especially AT&T, have used their market power to ensure chip designers and device makers make equipment compatible with their flavor of the technology, leaving smaller carriers in the cold. And without devices and network gear, C Spire says it’s been sitting on a costly resource it can’t use — and thus can’t deliver to you, the consumer.
“We will deploy our 4G LTE network,” said Eric Graham, C Spire Wireless’ senior vice president for strategic relations. “But the fact that AT&T is using a different band plan [that is, a set of technical standards for equipment] in the 700 MHz spectrum has slowed things down. At least initially we’ll be using other spectrum other than the 700 MHz spectrum we bought for 4G. But eventually, we are going to need that spectrum to add more capacity to our network.”
In the wireless industry, it seems, you can never have too much spectrum. Even AT&T and Verizon Wireless, which together control about 70 percent of the wireless market, say they need more of it. But even if you have enough spectrum, as C Spire argues, the big guys can use their leverage with suppliers to make it darn difficult for you to use it.
“As we transition to 4G LTE, spectrum is a key part of the strategy and survival of every carrier. And it’s the duty of the regulators to ensure that we don’t end up with a market of spectrum haves and have-nots.”
–Kathleen Ham, VP of federal regulatory affairs, T-Mobile

Can you imagine what would happen if the industry giants further solidified their hold on the market by hoarding even more spectrum? Bad things, those underdogs would assure you, starting with higher costs for consumers and fewer innovations. And that, they say, is why regulators and judges need to intercede.
“We are at a critical time in the evolution of the wireless industry,” said Kathleen Ham, vice president of federal regulatory affairs for T-Mobile, in an interview with CNET. “And as we transition to 4G LTE, spectrum is a key part of the strategy and survival of every carrier. And it’s the duty of the regulators to ensure that we don’t end up with a market of spectrum haves and have-nots.”
But how many competitors are needed in a market? Are two enough, or perhaps three? It’s this question that the Federal Communications Commission is trying to answer as it looks at some of the biggest in front of it today. T-Mobile, whose proposed $39 billion deal to merge with AT&T last year was rejected by the the Federal Communications Commission and the Department of Justice, says the FCC has already spoken to this point. And if it wants to preserve more competition, it had better establish policies that back that up.
“If the government turned down our deal [to merge with AT&T] because it wants us to continue to compete in the market,” T-Mobile’s Ham said, “then we need access to spectrum.”
This fight over spectrum is the battle through which nearly every major move by the wireless carriers must be viewed. It’s the reason that AT&T was willing to pay $39 billion to buy T-Mobile last year. It’s also what’s driving AT&T and Verizon Wireless to change their pricing models, eliminating unlimited data and creating share plans for data usage. It’s why the failure of Philip Falcone’s LightSquared is devastating not just to investors but to smaller wireless providers.
It’s why the largest wireless operators are spending millions of dollars each year in lobbying to make sure rules for new spectrum auctions are written in a way that favors their interests, and it’s why there has been so much wheeling and dealing around Verizon’s move to buy wireless spectrum from a consortium of cable operators.
The companies that come out ahead with valuable spectrum today will be able to dictate what happens in the market as carriers move to 4G LTE services that will provide broadband-like data speeds to wireless consumers. And that scares the daylights out of smaller competitors.
Big carriers with muscle
Getting your hands on spectrum doesn’t mean you’re on easy street. Even carriers that have spectrum they want to use can still be muscled out of the market when AT&T and Verizon throw their weight around.
Because those two companies collectively control the majority of wireless subscribers in the country, smaller carriers say AT&T and Verizon are able to manipulate standards groups and control suppliers to the point where smaller providers are unable to get access to handsets and other network gear that’s commercially available at high volumes to AT&T and Verizon.
C Spire says it’s been a victim of these tactics. In April, it filed an antitrust lawsuit against AT&T and its suppliers for trying to run it out of business. In the lawsuit, C Spire alleges that AT&T collaborated with chip makers and standards bodies to create specifications for devices that run only on its sliver of 700 MHz spectrum.
This is a problem for smaller carriers like C Spire, because they need to use the same specifications for their handsets and networking equipment that a bigger player such as AT&T uses in order to get products to sell to their customers. Without the scale of a company like AT&T, these smaller players simply can’t get manufacturers to build devices at a low enough cost and in a timely enough manner to compete against AT&T.
“AT&T has been abusing its position as a dominant buyer of the Lower 700 MHz wireless devices,” C Spire’s Graham said in a telephone interview.
For its part, AT&T says it created this “spectrum island” for technical reasons. AT&T argues that there are interference issues with the slice of 700 MHz spectrum that smaller carriers like C Spire own, and so to protect its wireless customers, AT&T developed its own “band class.”
An AT&T representative declined to comment on the litigation. But the company has said publicly that C Spire couldn’t prove that it didn’t have legitimate technical reasons for developing its own standard for its wireless spectrum.
Consequences of a concentrated market
C Spire is only one of dozens of smaller providers throughout the U.S. trying to compete with the nation’s two largest wireless providers. And the courts and the FCC are being asked to intervene and ensure competition where, not to put too fine a point on it, a relatively unfettered market has been unable to do so. And, as we said before, imagine the pickle C Spire would be in if the bigger companies were able to hoard even more spectrum?
It’s a similar situation to when a large company or university, which already owns big chunks of real estate in prime neighborhoods decides to buy even more property. The fear is that the big owner will force out the mom-and-pop shoe store and replace it with a Foot Locker. The same fear exists with wireless spectrum. Smaller carriers will not only be prevented from buying spectrum, they may also be forced out of business by bigger players that control the standards used in handsets and network equipment. And they may refuse to strike roaming agreements that would allow smaller carriers to offer a wider footprint of access on their networks.
This regulatory dilemma is coming to a head just as the FCC reviews the biggest transfer of wireless spectrum outside of a merger in the agency’s history.
Last year, Verizon announced a $4 billion bid to buy 20 MHz of valuable Advanced Wireless Service (AWS) spectrum from a consortium of cable companies called SpectrumCo. Verizon, which already owns about 20 MHz of AWS spectrum, says it wants to use the additional cable spectrum as backup spectrum for its 4G LTE network.
Verizon has already begun building its LTE network using a nationwide license of 700 MHz wireless spectrum. And it intends to use its AWS spectrum as well as the cable operators’ AWS spectrum to add capacity to that network as it grows, especially in dense urban areas.
But competing carriers say that Verizon already has enough AWS spectrum in many markets. Competitors such as T-Mobile and MetroPCS initially accused Verizon of “warehousing” spectrum. They say other carriers could put that same spectrum to use much more quickly than Verizon intends to use it.
“Verizon’s plan to acquire spectrum from the cable companies will allow Verizon to further dominate and control the nation’s airwaves.”
–U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.)

In July, T-Mobile struck a spectrum-swapping deal with Verizon. If Verizon’s deal with cable operators is approved by regulators, T-Mobile will buy some of Verizon’s AWS spectrum holdings in certain markets. As a result, T-Mobile has now withdrawn its opposition to the cable deal.
Others who have been critical of this deal say the FCC and Justice Department, which is also reviewing the deal, still need to impose some conditions on the merger to protect consumers. In a letter to the DOJ and the FCC, U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.) in late July pressed the government to adopt conditions that would ensure the partnership between Verizon and cable providers does not harm consumers .
“Verizon’s plan to acquire spectrum from the cable companies will allow Verizon to further dominate and control the nation’s airwaves,” Franken wrote in a letter to FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. “I am concerned that this transaction poses a serious threat to consumers and to competition that will ultimately result in higher prices and less choice for consumers. If your agencies do approve this deal, I urge you to only do so if you are able to adopt stringent conditions to protect competition and the public interest.”
The FCC’s big opportunity
Other stakeholders, such as the Rural Carrier Association, a Washington DC-based lobbying group, expect regulators to approve the deal. And like Franken, they are pushing for conditions. In fact, Steve Berry, the head of RCA, thinks that the FCC can use the Verizon-cable deal as a springboard to impose conditions that will prevent Verizon from gaining too much control over spectrum in any given market. And he thinks carefully crafted conditions could also prevent interoperability issues such as the one that C Spire faces with AT&T.
“The FCC has a unique opportunity with this deal to make a win-win-win for Verizon, the cable operators and the rest of the industry,” Berry said. “This is the largest spectrum deal that the FCC has ever considered, and it makes sense for the FCC to set some competitive policy parameters.”
Speaking at an industry event in June, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson urged regulators to speed up spectrum license transfers. “By 2013 demand [for wireless data services in the U.S.] will outstrip supply. … This isn’t a problem that is six to eight years from now. It’s happening now.”
(Credit: CNET/Marguerite Reardon)
Verizon has already signaled it’s willing to make concessions to get the deal completed. In April, the company said it would sell 700 MHz spectrum in the lower A and B blocks if the deal with the cable operators wins approval from regulators. And at the end of June, it said it had struck a deal with T-Mobile USA to sell big chunks of AWS spectrum it already owns to T-Mobile, if the deal with SpectrumCo is completed.
RCA’s Berry said that this deal with T-Mobile must be examined more closely to make sure that Verizon is still not “warehousing” spectrum in markets where it could be used immediately by other carriers.
“It’s not a cure-all,” he said. “But clearly it gets some of the spectrum in the hands of competitive carriers. Even so, the FCC needs to look very closely at this.”
Why this is important
There’s no question competition keeps prices in check and spurs innovation. But how many competitors are needed in a market? Many believe that a scenario with two players in a market, a so-called duopoly, is just one competitor shy of a monopoly. And policy makers at the FCC have done what they can to avoid such a scenario.
Some consumer advocates say the concentrated power of AT&T and Verizon have in the market has already resulted in higher prices for data services. Two years ago, AT&T eliminated its $30 unlimited data plan, replacing it with a tiered offering. Verizon Wireless followed a year later with its own tiered offering. Now both AT&T and Verizon Wireless have introduced new “share plans,” which allow people on the same family plan to share buckets of data or allows individuals to use their data across multiple devices.
The plans are meant to encourage users to bring additional devices, like tablets to the network, but they will also increase pricing on data services. As part of these new plans, Verizon has cut in half the amount of data it’s offering to consumers at roughly the same price. Verizon now charges $50 for a 1GB data plan that also includes unlimited voice minutes and text messages. Its previous plan offered 2GB of data for $30 a month, and voice minutes and text messaging were sold separately. AT&T offers similarly priced plans
• See also: Help! These data share plans are too confusing (FAQ)
Even though AT&T and Verizon are bundling in unlimited voice and text messaging with the new share packages, consumers are still paying more and receiving less data than they were allotted under the previous plans.
“The cheapest option Verizon now offers smartphone customers is $90 for half as much data as $80 buys you today,” Michael Weinberg, an analyst at Public Knowledge, wrote in a blog post last month. “And in less than 12 months, $30 has gone from buying you unlimited data to not even covering 1 GB…There does not appear to be very much competitive pressure keeping carriers from raising prices for customers — which is part of the reason that we are against even more consolidation in the market.”
Meanwhile, competitors such as Sprint and T-Mobile, along with regional carriers like Leap Wireless and MetroPCS, have not introduced share plans. And they are keeping unlimited data plans, although some like T-Mobile slow down service after a certain threshold is reached. Sprint is the only major carrier that offers unlimited data with no limitations for smartphone customers.
T-Mobile has publicly criticized Verizon’s new pricing plan, stating that it doesn’t offer consumer enough choice and penalizes customers who exceed their limits.
“What wireless customers really want is worry-free plans,” said Harry Thomas, director of segment marketing for T-Mobile. “They don’t want to have to do a lot of calculations to figure out if someone is going to go over their monthly data limit due to excessive usage.”
But there’s an increasingly contrarian viewpoint that says, wait a minute, the government should not be in the business of intervening for market laggards. Yes, we couldn’t finish this piece without giving an enthusiastic proponent of free and unfettered markets his two cents.
Eli Dourado, a research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, argues that “duopoly can be consistent with vigorous competition.” He uses the digital camera market as an example. Nikon and Canon are the only two major players selling DSLRs on the market. And “despite the dominance of these two firms, the price of DSLRs falls every year, and quality continuously goes up.”
Now a little background: The Mercatus Center is one of the most influential conservative think-tanks. It gets significant financial backing from the conservative libertarian-leaning Koch Family Foundations. And democratic strategist Rob Stein described the Mercatus Center as “ground zero for deregulation policy in Washington.”
He argues in a recent blog post that it may simply be unreasonable to expect several competitors to remain in the wireless market, because the fixed costs for operating these businesses is so high. It takes billions of dollars to buy wireless spectrum and build and maintain communications infrastructure. The same is true for other industries, such as commercial jet aircraft manufacturers. Today there are effectively only two competitors: Boeing and Airbus.
“Would we really want there to be more commercial jet producers? There would be a whole lot of duplication of costs, and the price of jetliners and air travel would increase, not decrease. We’re better off with a duopoly, and in fact we get duopoly precisely because vigorous competition between the jumbo jet giants keeps everyone else out.”
It’s a fair point. But there is no guarantee that companies that find big savings by consolidating will pass those savings onto consumers. In fact, when there are only one or two players in the market, there is little incentive to drop prices when the business gets more efficient.
“As a result, when thinking about carrier consolidation, you are essentially faced with two choices,” said Public Knowledge’s Weinberg. “One is to allow rapid consolidation in the hope of gaining efficiencies of scale, but at the same time recognize that the mo/duopoly you create will eventually have to be regulated as such or broken up. The other is to engage in a lighter level of regulation today that ensures that there is competition in the wireless market, and that said competitive market is capable of largely regulating itself.”
“The option that does not exist is to allow the formation of a monopoly or a duopoly,” he added, “and assume it will then act in the best interest of everyone else.”

If I Were The MPAA… How I Would Deal With My Car Break-In Techdirt8/13/12 14:21 Harold Feld

If I Were The MPAA… How I Would Deal With My Car Break-In
Techdirt8/13/12 14:21 Harold Feld

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120813/10323120007/if-i-were-mpaa-how-i-would-deal-with-my-car-break-in.shtml

My family and I got back from our annual vacation in the Current Middle Ages last Friday morning around 2 a.m. Exhausted from the trip, I forgot to take in my iPod and left it visibly displayed on the front seat. When I went out to the car the next morning, I found the passenger-side window broken and the iPod (along with some other items in the front seat) stolen. I called the police, and an officer came out to take my report. He was properly professional and sympathetic. He informed me that the chief tool available was a database that pawnshops must maintain of any electronic devices that are pawned. If the serial number on my iPod came up in the database, they would nab the felon. Otherwise, though, there wasn’t much hope. The officer also advised me that there had been some similar incidents in the general neighborhood and that the best way to avoid having my car broken into in the future was to make sure that no electronics or charging cords were visible. I thanked him for his professionalism and advice and that was that.

Then I got to thinking, what if I were the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) or the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)? How would I handle the theft of my iPod and the advice from the police on how to avoid future break ins? Rather differently, as I explain below . . . .

So if I were the MPAA, how would I handle this?

• Berate the cop who answered my call for not stopping the crime before it happened. I would also go around to everyone in my neighborhood and accuse them of “supporting theft” from their failure to set up a neighborhood watch to protect my right to leave my iPod in the front seat of my car.

• When the cop told me that I could reduce the likelihood of future car break-ins by keeping electronics hidden, I would shout at the cop for “supporting theft.” After all, I have a perfect right to keep my iPod in my car, prominently displayed if I want. How dare this cop tell me to change my behavior to avoid getting robbed!

• Later, I would try to get the cop who advised me on how to avoid future car break-ins fired for “abetting car thieves.” I would conduct a public smear campaign in which I accused this cop of being in bed with thieves, fences, and other nefarious dealers in stolen goods because he “supports theft” by advising me how to avoid future car break-ins rather than setting a 24/7 guard on my driveway or preemptively arresting anyone who looks like he or she might steal my iPod. After all, if you really cared about stopping theft, you wouldn’t tell me to change my behavior or take steps to protect myself! I have a perfect right to leave my iPod in my front seat, and theft is wrong. So telling me to hide my iPod to avoid a break in means you don’t really want to enforce the law.

• While I’m at it, I will also accuse my neighbors of secretly wanting to steal my iPod. They have motive (who wouldn’t want a free iPod?) and opportunity, so they are all prime suspects. I will demand the police conduct a house-to-house search. If they are too busy, I insist the police give ME the right to do a house-to-house search. I will also start harassing my neighbors and treating them like criminals. If they tell me to bugger off, and demand to see a warrant before I search their homes for my iPod, I will point to their bad attitude as proof that they are either thieves or support thieves. Why else would they object?

• I would lobby the Montgomery County Council to place a 24/7 guard on my driveway so I can leave my iPod in the front seat. I would also insist on a video surveillance system and fingerprinting for anyone who comes with 500 feet of my car. Any neighbors who complain about what a waste of tax payer money this is, or that it invades their privacy, or that they don’t like giving fingerprints to police to protect my right to leave my iPod in the front seat “support theft” and deserve the smear treatment.

• I would give $1 million in campaign donations to any County Council rep who votes for my proposals. I would give the same amount to the opponents of any County Council member who even suggests that my proposals are a little extreme and maybe I ought to just put my iPod in the glove compartment. I would hold parties where County Council members can meet famous movie stars and recording artists, all of whom will urge the members of the County Council to vote for my eminently reasonable proposal to avert the veritable crime wave of iPod thefts in my driveway.

• I would produce statistics that show that Montgomery County loses thousands of dollars and numerous jobs annually from iPod theft from my driveway. Anyone who questions the accuracy of these statistics “supports iPod theft.”

• Then I will wonder why I am so unpopular with my neighbors. I will conclude they have been deluded by the pawnshop lobby. Or they support iPod theft. But it can’t be anything wrong with me, since I have a perfect right to leave my iPod in the front seat of my car and anyone who questions any measures to protect that right either supports theft or is being controlled by the pawnshop lobby.

You may ask, wouldn’t it actually be easier, cheaper and more effective for me to change my habits and be a bit more careful about leaving my iPod and other electronic devices on the front seat of my car? To which I can only say “if you can even ask that question, you clearly support iPod theft.”

Stay tuned . . .

Summertime Music – Music Ideas in the K12 Classroom

Educational CyberPlayGround Music Ideas in the K12 Classroom

Summertime Music – Music Ideas in the K12 Classroom

 
Mongo Jerry video clip was made in 1970, and is the original Mungo Jerry line up that recorded In The Summertime
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvUQcnfwUUM]
Harry Nilsson – Coconut 1971
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tbgv8PkO9eo]
Spirit In The Sky – Norman Greenbaum
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6TFW1F6oY0]
Witch Doctor – Ooh Eeh Ooh Ah Aah Ting Tang Walla Walla Bing
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYgOlqinH7A]
The Rivingtons – Papa Oom Mow Mow
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMVGJVgsoHg]
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gqiZ7DBgaA]
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C62TJzcbfjM]
Sam The Sham & The Pharaohs – Wooly Bully
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inGF8su1GZo
Bobby Mc Ferrin -Don’t worry , be happy
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yjnvSQuv-H4]
Little Eva – Locomotion (Shindig 1965)
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xufxKCC1NJ8]
Beach Boys – Surfin’ USA (1963)
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Grj7sjQ0_p4]

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround

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Happy Reading for today,
Utah Artists Project
The Utah Artists Project is part of the digital initiative work at the J. Williard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. The goal of the project is “to improve access to information about and knowledge of the work of Utah’s most prominent visual artists.” The project began with a core list of 200 artists, and since then it has grown significantly. Each entry features biographical information, images of key artworks, and archival materials. A good place to start here is the entry for Anna C. Bliss, a nonrepresentational artist whose work examines ideas about color perception and geometry. The categories of art included here are a diverse, including furniture making, mixed media, and textiles. New material is added to the site on a regular basis, and it’s worth bookmarking for a return visit or two.
http://www.lib.utah.edu/collections/utah-artists/
“As a photographer, Joel shoots like a fellow musician. Bernstein blends in, using all the resources of his understanding of the songs, the instruments, the subject, and the people. There is soul and movement and most of all, music, in every one of Joel’s images. This is what it looked like, and this is what it felt like. These are truthful angels. ~ Cameron Crowe, director of “Almost Famous” and “Jerry Maguire”
http://ow.ly/cLPDT
Tacoma Community History Project
Community histories have become increasingly popular, and this interdisciplinary project from the University of Washington-Tacoma is part of that growing trend. The materials here include oral histories gathered by students working under the direction of Professor Michael Honey for his undergraduate and graduate courses. This collection contains 50 oral histories, and visitors can explore all of them via an interactive map or the Explore By Communities tab. It is worth noting that the histories
include other communities within south Puget Sound, such as Gig Harbor and University Place. Some of the titles here include “Italians in Hilltop” and “A Blue Collar Town: The Tacoma Labor Movement.” The materials date back to 1991 and include transcripts of each interview. Finally, the About area contains information about student involvement in the project, along with information on community involvement and engagement. http://content.lib.washington.edu/tacomacommweb/index.html
Leaked MPAA Memo Reveals TV-Shack Press Strategy
A leaked “memo” from the MPAA shows how movie industry insiders are being briefed to respond in media interviews on the extradition case of TV-Shack admin Richard O’Dwyer. In the talking points the MPAA describes the UK student as a deliberate criminal while mocking his wardrobe. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, who launched a petition to stop the extradition, is called out as “presumptuous” by the movie industry group.

Leaked MPAA Memo Reveals TV-Shack Press Strategy


Thomas H. and Joan W. Gandy Photograph Collection
The Louisiana Digital Library has a wide array of historical collections that document everything from Acadian culture to the vibrancy of Mardi Gras in New Orleans. This particular collection brings together photographs of Natchez from photographers Henry Norman, Henry Gurney, and Earl Norman. Visitors can make their way through over 160 images here, such as shots of barbershops, prominent buildings, distinguished antebellum mansions, and scenes of everyday life. The informal photos are quite wonderful; visitors shouldn’t miss “Card game” or the “Children and Snowmen” image. As a whole, the collection answers a number of compelling questions, including “How did people dress to have their pictures taken?” and “What did Natchez-Under-The-Hill look like in the late 1800s?”
http://louisdl.louislibraries.org/index.php?name=Thomas%20H.%20and%20Joan%20W.%20Gandy%20Photograph%20Collection
Woz rips “the Cloud”
Apple co-founder Wozniak predicts ‘horrible problems’ with cloud computing. “With the cloud, you don’t own anything. You already signed it away” through the legalistic terms of service with a cloud provider that computer users must agree to.
“I want to feel that I own things,” Wozniak said. “A lot of people feel, ‘Oh, everything is really on my computer,’ but I say the more we transfer everything onto the web, onto the cloud, the less we’re going to have control over it.”
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/08/05/apple-co-founder-wozniak-predicts-horrible-problems-with-cloud-computing/
Cabinet of Wonders
http://www.npr.org/series/153299281/cabinet-of-wonders
The noted musician and impresario John Wesley Harding has created a new
variety show for National Public Radio. It’s called “Cabinet of Wonders” and
on the program’s home page, it says that the show will “make you laugh,
think and sing along. Sometimes all at once.” The program is recorded live at the City Winery in New York City, and so far performers on the have included John Hodgman, Colson Whitehead, Rick Moody, and Edie Brickell. Visitors can listen to each show in its entirety here, or download the programs at their leisure. Each program features a brief description of the performance, along with related links and other resources.
Seaquence
Simply put, Seaquence is “an experiment in musical composition”. It’s a
rather modest way to describe this truly unique online experience. By
adopting a biological metaphor, visitors can “create and combine musical
lifeforms resulting in an organic, dynamic composition.” There are visual
“creatures” on the site which can be manipulated by users as they are encouraged to add different elements to the creation “dish” here. The combination of different creatures results in unique musical compositions that always change as they move about the screen. There’s a demonstration in the About area, which is a great way to learn about how the different controls work. After completing a composition via their creatures, visitors can save each composition by clicking “share” so they can send them along tofriends and other creative types. http://www.seaquence.org/
From The Byrds To The Eagles [1-7]

Scientists discover virus that kills all grades of breast cancer ‘within seven days
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/09/23/scientists-discover-virus-that-kills-all-types-of-breast-cancer-within-seven-days/
Irish Museum of Modern Art
If you’ve been thinking that art in Ireland is all penny whistles and fiddlers and maybe some lace, it’s time to pay a visit to the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA). IMMA displays its collection “in rotating temporary exhibitions, exploring the work of individual artists in solo displays, and through curated group exhibitions.” Currently, Time out of Mind: Works from the IMMA Collection is on view at the National Concert Hall in Dublin. At the IMMA website, wander the Museum’s wings by taking one of the four
virtual tours provided: Mindful Media, work from the 1970s by New York-based
Irish artist Les Levine; the Madden Arnholz Collection – old master prints collected by Fritz (Colm) Arnholz and Etain Madden Arnholz, an early donation to the IMMA; paintings made in the last 10 years by Philip Taaffe; and Twenty: Celebrating 20 Years of the Irish Museum of Modern Art. The Permanent Collection Database is under construction, and a search feature should be released this year.
http://www.imma.ie/en/index.htm
Human cycles: History as science
For the past 15 years, Turchin has been taking the mathematical techniques that once allowed him to track predator–prey cycles in forest ecosystems, and applying them to human history. He has analysed historical records on economic activity, demographic trends and outbursts of violence in the United States, and has come to the conclusion that a new wave of internal strife is already on its way. The peak should occur in about 2020, he says, and will probably be at least as high as the one in around 1970. “I hope it won’t be as bad as 1870,” he adds.
Nature 488, 24–26 ( 02 August 2012 )
http://unam.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=0eb0ac9b4e8565f2967a8304b&id=3261a206ea&e=d38efa683e
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[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround NetHappenings Newsletter

Nethappenings Newsletter Headlines and Resources

Utah Artists Project
http://www.lib.utah.edu/collections/utah-artists/
The Utah Artists Project is part of the digital initiative work at the J.
Williard Marriott Library at the University of Utah. The goal of the project
is “to improve access to information about and knowledge of the work of
Utah’s most prominent visual artists.” The project began with a core list of
200 artists, and since then it has grown significantly. Each entry features
biographical information, images of key artworks, and archival materials. A
good place to start here is the entry for Anna C. Bliss, a
nonrepresentational artist whose work examines ideas about color perception
and geometry. The categories of art included here are a diverse, including
furniture making, mixed media, and textiles. New material is added to the
site on a regular basis, and it’s worth bookmarking for a return visit or
two.
Tacoma Community History Project
http://content.lib.washington.edu/tacomacommweb/index.html
Community histories have become increasingly popular, and this
interdisciplinary project from the University of Washington-Tacoma is part
of that growing trend. The materials here include oral histories gathered by
students working under the direction of Professor Michael Honey for his
undergraduate and graduate courses. This collection contains 50 oral
histories, and visitors can explore all of them via an interactive map or
the Explore By Communities tab. It is worth noting that the histories
include other communities within south Puget Sound, such as Gig Harbor and
University Place. Some of the titles here include “Italians in Hilltop” and
“A Blue Collar Town: The Tacoma Labor Movement.” The materials date back to
1991 and include transcripts of each interview. Finally, the About area
contains information about student involvement in the project, along with
information on community involvement and engagement.
Thomas H. and Joan W. Gandy Photograph Collection
http://louisdl.louislibraries.org/index.php?name=Thomas%20H.%20and%20Joan%20W.%20Gandy%20Photograph%20Collection
The Louisiana Digital Library has a wide array of historical collections
that document everything from Acadian culture to the vibrancy of Mardi Gras
in New Orleans. This particular collection brings together photographs of
Natchez from photographers Henry Norman, Henry Gurney, and Earl Norman.
Visitors can make their way through over 160 images here, such as shots of
barbershops, prominent buildings, distinguished antebellum mansions, and
scenes of everyday life. The informal photos are quite wonderful; visitors
shouldn’t miss “Card game” or the “Children and Snowmen” image. As a whole,
the collection answers a number of compelling questions, including “How did
people dress to have their pictures taken?” and “What did Natchez-Under-The-
Hill look like in the late 1800s?”
Cabinet of Wonders
http://www.npr.org/series/153299281/cabinet-of-wonders
The noted musician and impresario John Wesley Harding has created a new
variety show for National Public Radio. It’s called “Cabinet of Wonders” and
on the program’s home page, it says that the show will “make you laugh,
think and sing along. Sometimes all at once.” The program is recorded live
at the City Winery in New York City, and so far performers on the have
included John Hodgman, Colson Whitehead, Rick Moody, and Edie Brickell.
Visitors can listen to each show in its entirety here, or download the
programs at their leisure. Each program features a brief description of the
performance, along with related links and other resources.
Seaquence
http://www.seaquence.org/
Simply put, Seaquence is “an experiment in musical composition”. It’s a
rather modest way to describe this truly unique online experience. By
adopting a biological metaphor, visitors can “create and combine musical
lifeforms resulting in an organic, dynamic composition.” There are visual
“creatures” on the site which can be manipulated by users as they are
encouraged to add different elements to the creation “dish” here. The
combination of different creatures results in unique musical compositions
that always change as they move about the screen. There’s a demonstration in
the About area, which is a great way to learn about how the different
controls work. After completing a composition via their creatures, visitors
can save each composition by clicking “share” so they can send them along to
friends and other creative types.
Irish Museum of Modern Art
http://www.imma.ie/en/index.htm
If you’ve been thinking that art in Ireland is all penny whistles and
fiddlers and maybe some lace, it’s time to pay a visit to the Irish Museum
of Modern Art (IMMA). IMMA displays its collection “in rotating temporary
exhibitions, exploring the work of individual artists in solo displays, and
through curated group exhibitions.” Currently, Time out of Mind: Works from
the IMMA Collection is on view at the National Concert Hall in Dublin. At
the IMMA website, wander the Museum’s wings by taking one of the four
virtual tours provided: Mindful Media, work from the 1970s by New York-based
Irish artist Les Levine; the Madden Arnholz Collection – old master prints
collected by Fritz (Colm) Arnholz and Etain Madden Arnholz, an early
donation to the IMMA; paintings made in the last 10 years by Philip Taaffe;
and Twenty: Celebrating 20 Years of the Irish Museum of Modern Art. The
Permanent Collection Database is under construction, and a search feature
should be released this year.

Olympics

The Economist, have been intrigued by the business aspects of the Games. There is an interesting hierarchy of sponsors. Organizers not willing to pay for play

Olympics

As the Summer Olympics begin in London, there is some well-founded
anxiety about the long-term benefits of hosting such a grand venture
Business and the Olympics: Victors and spoils
http://www.economist.com/node/21559326
London Olympics: Are organizers not willing to pay for play?
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-0724-olympics-
music-20120724,0,4734546.story
Why The Olympics Aren’t Good For Us, And How They Can Be
http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/24/opinion/opinion-olympics-future-
perryman/index.html
BBC Sport: Olympics
http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/olympics/2012/
London 2012
http://www.olympic.org/london-2012-summer-olympics
Opening Ceremony of 1948 London Olympics
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13391235
This Friday, the Olympics will return to London for the first time since
1948, and the entire world will be watching. This major sporting event
itself will be closely watched by the usual suspects (sports media, pundits,
and the like), but urban studies types will be most interested in watching
after the fact to see how the infrastructure improvements created for the
Olympics hold up over time. A number of commentators, including the folks at
The Economist, have been intrigued by the business aspects of the Games. In
an article in this week’s edition, they reported that the British
government’s budget for the games is around $14.5 billion. In addition, the
International Olympic Committee has raised $4.87 billion in broadcast fees
for the Olympic cycle that includes the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver,
B.C. They also noted that there is an interesting hierarchy of sponsors. And
what of the broad benefits that might accrue to the host country? The
findings are mixed: Victor Matheson of the College of the Holy Cross noted
that organizers of big sporting events tend to overestimate the benefits and
underestimate the costs. Illustrating this point, noted academics Bent
Flyvbjerg and Allison Stewart of Oxford University recently released a
working paper noting that every Olympiad since 1960 has gone over budget.
This may increase anxiety for the average Briton. [KMG]
The first link leads to The Economist article which offers a cost-benefit
analysis of hosting the London Summer Olympics. The second link will take
users to a piece from the Los Angeles Times about the pay scale for major
pop music acts that will be appearing at the Games. Moving along, the third
link will whisk visitors to a nice editorial piece by Mark Perryman on how
the Olympics could be improved the next go-round. The fourth link will lead
interested parties to the BBC’s site dedicated to coverage of the Summer
Olympics. The fifth link will take guests to the official London Summer
Olympics, complete with detailed schedule, venue information, and video
clips. The last link leads to a wonderful newsreel of the opening ceremonies
of the 1948 Olympic Games, which were also held in London.
Victor Matheson of the College of the Holy Cross

Google Wallet payment subscription service Fails

Your Google Storage plan didn’t automatically renew -The Google Storage Team sucks.

The other night I got a message from Google
saying that because of a credit card issue,
my storage had been ‘downgraded.’
The number of my emails appeared to have
dropped by 30,000.
This was most alarming.
I emailed Vint Cerf at Google and he got right on it.
He established that nothing was deleted.
Thanks again, Vint.
A kindly followup from Julio Alvarez at Google said:
>In this case, there was an error processing your Google Wallet payment instrument causing the subscription to cancel. This is a known issue affecting a very small number of users as we migrate to a newer subscription service.
>
>In any case, we provide 30 days of grace storage at the start of the subscription end date to give users time to escalate in the rare event an error happens.
Their initial, alarming message (below) said nothing about a grace period or correctiing the situation.
(In my alarm, I had read the wrong figure for the number
of remaining emails.)
Not fun.
Ted
———- Forwarded message ———-
From:  <no-reply@google.com>
Date: Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 7:28 PM
Subject: Your Google Storage plan didn’t automatically renew
To:ted
Hi there,
Our records indicate that you’ve elected to renew your Google Paid
Storage subscription for an additional year. However, we were unable
to process the payment using the default credit card provided in your
Google Checkout account.
At this time, your quota has been downgraded to the Basic Plan. If you
would like to continue using paid storage, you can upgrade your
account at any time by visiting your account management page. If you
have any questions, please visit our help center.
-The Google Storage Team


Theodor Holm Nelson PhD
Designer-Generalist, The Internet Archive
Visiting Professor, University of Southampton
My recent books, POSSIPLEX and ‘Geeks Bearing Gifts’,
are available from Lulu.com and Amazon.
“Ted Nelson is an idealistic troublemaker
who coined the word ‘hypertext’ in the sixties,
and continues to fight for a completely different
computer world.”

The Stations That Spoke Your Language: Radio and the Yiddish American Cultural Renaissance

FREE Symposium: September 6, and Friday, September 7, 2012, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress

The Stations That Spoke Your Language: Radio and the Yiddish American Cultural Renaissance

Symposium: September 6-7, 2012
Montpellier Room, Madison Building, Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave., SE
Washington, DC
On Thursday, September 6, and Friday, September 7, 2012, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress will present a free public symposium on The Stations That Spoke Your Language: Radio and the Yiddish-American Cultural Renaissance. Leading Yiddish language and culture experts will join media scholars and Library of Congress specialists to address Yiddish radio in America: its history and cultural impact, its continuing influence on American media, and its multifaceted legacy. The symposium marks the Center’s recent acquisition of the Henry Sapoznik Collection of more than one thousand historic Yiddish radio broadcasts from the 1920s through the 1950s, and is presented in collaboration with the Hebraic Section of the Library’s African and Middle Eastern Division.
The symposium is free of charge, but space is limited. Reservations are strongly recommended. Please contact Nancy Groce at ngro@loc.gov to reserve seats.
For more information on topics, scholars, and to review the schedule, please visit: http://www.loc.gov/folklife/Symposia/yiddishradio/index.html