Reaching Inner City Youth through the Arts 2014

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Professional Development
for K-16 and Community
Based Educators
Community Works Journal—Online Magazine for Educators
REGISTER TODAY, SPECIAL RATES Through June 15th  Curriculum Planning, Teaching Tools, and Inspiring Collaboration 2014 SUMMER INSTITUTES for K-16 EDUCATORS Place, Service-Learning, and Sustainable Communities Los Angeles and Vermont
City Hearts: Reaching Inner City Youth through the Arts 2014 SUMMER INSTITUTES for K-16 EDUCATORS Place, Service-Learning, and Sustainable Communities
 
“City Hearts: Kids Say Yes to the Arts” is an Arts enrichment program in the Los Angeles County area that was founded by Sherry and Bob Jason in 1984 and began offering classes in 1985. City Hearts hires teachers from Los Angeles’ Arts community to teach dance, acting, circus arts, musical theatre, Shakespeare, singing, crafts, and photography free to the community’s most impoverished children. The list of arts and artists continues to grow, connecting thousands of underprivileged students with professionals to inspire learning and integrate disaffected youth back into the community through the Arts. The following is a recent interview with founder Sherry Jason.
snip
The Arts Should Be for Everyone
“I began teaching ballet at the age of eleven in my garage, charging 50 cents a class. Even then there was a family—the father was a schoolteacher, and the mother worked in Bob’s Big Boy as a car hop. They had three kids, and ballet lessons for their two girls would have cost their lunch money. Right then and there I decided that art should be provided to every child, regardless of their ability to pay. I waived their fee.”
snip
 
SUGGESTED RESOURCES  For further reading about the importance of the arts in brain development and interconnections between the arts and learning, see the following resources. –eds.
 

The Folklore & Education Section now has it's Folklore & Education Newsletter

The Folklore & Education Section now has it’s Folklore & Education Newsletter

The Folklore and Education section produces an annual newsletter, awards the Dorothy Howard Folklore and Education Prize and the Robinson-Roeder-Ward Fellowship, works with partners in the field, and organizes sessions and events at the AFS annual meeting.   The Latest Edition of the Folklore and Education Section Newsletter is available online: Spring 2014 (pdf). (See below for the archive of newsletters dating from 2001.)
The Latest Edition of the Folklore and Education Section Newsletter is available online: Spring 2014 (pdf).
Gregory Hansen Editor
Rosemary Hathaway, the newsletter’s co-editor
 

K-12 Classrooom Projects for March

K-12 Classrooom Projects for March

– National Women’s History Month Special Edition
http://tinyurl.com/k5pzr
– National Ethics Awareness Month
http://tinyurl.com/yrol9m
International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (March 21)
http://tinyurl.com/26oqom
Ethics of “News Writing”
http://tinyurl.com/yukp5n
Music in Our Schools Month
http://tinyurl.com/yqsfdl
Start a School Band with no money
http://tinyurl.com/2ua53m
Patriotic Songs
http://ow.ly/iOS2X
Capture Your Culture and Record Your Memory
http://tinyurl.com/3dof4d
World Music
http://tinyurl.com/2v6awn
Birthday of Albert Einstein (March 14, 1879)
http://tinyurl.com/2taasp
St. Patricks Day – Teach History Through Music 8th grade State Standards
http://tinyurl.com/y9skjb
Irish American Vernacular English and the hidden influence of
Irish and Scots-Gaelic on what we call American English
http://tinyurl.com/2b6k7q
The famous Irish patriot and martyr Wolfe Tone lived near me in West Chester PA. <@cyberplayground>
Whiskey Rebellion 1790’s “Run Johnny Run”
Society of United Irishmen and the Whiskey rebellion army
Wolfe Tone is forced to go underground with his movement.
He becomes strongly influenced by the French Revolution.
The suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion also had the unintended
consequences of encouraging small whiskey producers and other
settlers to relocate to more distant lands in Kentucky and Tennessee,
which remained outside the sphere of Federal control for many more years.
In these frontier areas, they also found good corn-growing country as well
as limestone-filtered water and therefore began making whiskey from corn.
The “Whiskey Rebellion” in western Pennsylvania was a revolt of Irish
farmers who made their own whiskey not wanting to pay Secretary of the
Treasury, Alexander Hamilton?s excise tax. Washington put down the
rebellion with troops. Jefferson, who already resigned from the Cabinet,
criticized the government’s actions.
Benjamin Franklin wrote; “It is a fact that the Irish emigrants and their
children are now in the possession of the government of Pennsylvania.”
George Washington elected the first President of the United States,
Charles Thomson as Secretary of the Continental Congress brings
him the news. Washington was, as shown earlier second cousins
to a family of McCarthy’s. His diary shows he was very close to the family.
Washington’s family was from the south-western part of England that had a Celtic tie.
Washington in gratitude to his Irish supporters once offered this prayer:
“when Ireland shall strike her harp to the wild notes
of Erin and Liberty, the ocean breeze will bear to her
shores the prayers of Americans, to cheer her in her
glorious struggle, and hail her regenerate in the rights
of mankind.
Ireland, thou friend of my country in my country’s most
friendless days, much injured, much enduring land,
accept this poor tribute from one who esteems thy worth,
and mourns thy desolation. May the God of Heaven,
in His justice and mercy, grant thee more prosperous
fortunes and in His own good time, cause the sun of
Freedom to shed its benign radiance on the Emerald Isle.”
Kilkenny native James Hoban won the design contest for the
“President’s Palace”, later known as the White House. Hoban based the
winning design on Leinster House in Dublin. Previously, he built the
capital at Columbia, South Carolina. George Washington, and James Hoban
in his position as Master Mason of the Federal of Free and Accepted Masons,
laid the cornerstone of the White House.

ACLS Announces 2013 Public Fellows Program

ACLS Announces 2013 Public Fellows Program

The American Council of Learned Societies invites applications for the third competition of the Public Fellows program. The program will place 20 recent humanities PhDs in two- year staff positions at partnering organizations in government and the nonprofit sector. This career-launching initiative aims to demonstrate that the capacities developed in the advanced study of the humanities have wide application, both within and beyond the academy.
In 2013, Public Fellows have the opportunity to join one of the following organizations:
Continue reading “ACLS Announces 2013 Public Fellows Program”