Constance Bommelaer Senior Director, Global Policy Partnerships

Constance Bommelaer

Senior Director, Global Policy Partnerships

Constance joined the Internet Society in 2006. She is currently Senior Director of Global Policy Partnerships and helps developing partnerships with international organizations as well as strategic positions on key Internet issues. In this role, she founded and now coordinates the Internet Technical Advisory Committee (ITAC) to the OECD. She also leads ISOC’s engagement with UNESCO, WIPO, the G8, the G20 and the IGF. In 2010 and 2011 she was responsible for the strategic development of the Internet Society’s Next Generation Leaders program, a youth program designed to help prepare young professionals from around the world to become the next generation of Internet technology, policy, and business leaders.
She was previously a Policy Officer with the French Prime Minister’s Office (Direction du development des medias; 2003-2006), covering Internet governance matters, regulatory affairs and information society issues. Constance participated in the World Summit on Information Society (WSIS), contributed to building legal and technical cooperation activities between France and African countries (e.g. Signal Spam project) and acted as a liaison with the European Commission on French e-content related projects.
Since 2003, Constance also serves as a Naval Ensign in the reserve of the French Navy.
She has studied law and political sciences and speaks fluent English.
Constance is based in Geneva, Switzerland
 

From: Constance Bommelaer <bommelaer@isoc.org>
Date: December 20, 2013 12:27:32 PM EST
Subject: [Internet Policy] 1net Steering Committee & Brazil Committees – Call for expressions of interest – Internet technical community

 

Dear all,
 
The Internet Society (ISOC) is coordinating the process leading to appointments to represent the Internet technical community in two of the “Brazil Planning Committees” and in the “1net Steering Committee”
 
The “Brazil Planning Committees” will contribute to the preparation of a “Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance” that will be held on 23 and 24 April 2014, in Sao Paolo, Brazil.
 
The two major tasks of “1net Steering Committee” will be (1) to liaise with stakeholder communities and encourage participation and submission of productive ideas with respect to Internet governance issues; and (2) to steer, manage, and otherwise lead the activities of the 1net platform towards a productive understanding and possibly consensus with respect to these issues.
 
Individuals interested in being suggested by the NomCom set up for this purpose are invited to read more about the process and the timeline here: http://www.internetsociety.org/sites/default/files/Call1netBR-ForPublication.pdf 
 
The deadline for submitting expressions of interest is 10 January 2014.
 
Any questions or requests for additional information can be sent to: information.itcg@gmail.com.
 
Useful links:
 
 
Thank you and best regards,
Constance Bommelaer
Senior Director, Global Policy Partnerships
The Internet Society

Leonie Haimson: The Woman Who Stopped Bill Gates, Rupert Murdoch, and the Ed Profiteers

Diane Ravitch’s blog

Leonie Haimson: The Woman Who Stopped Bill Gates, Rupert Murdoch, and the Ed Profiteers

Below is a letter from Leonie Haimson, who was previously added to the honor roll of this blog for fighting for students, parents, and public education.
Leonie almost singlehandedly stopped the effort to mine student data, whose sponsors wanted confidential and identifiable information about every child “for the children’s sake.” Leonie saw through that ruse and raised a national ruckus to fight for student privacy. privacy of student records is supposedly protected by federal law (FERPA), but Arne Duncan weakened the regulations so that parents could not opt out of the data mining.
It is not over. The Gates Foundation and Carnegie Corporation put up $100 million to start inBloom, and Rupert Murdoch’s Wireless Generation got the contract to develop the software, and amazon.com pans to put it on a “cloud.” They will be back. We count on Haimson and the many parents she has inspired to remain vigilant on behalf of our children. As a grandparent of a child in second grade in a Brooklyn public school, I have a personal interest in keeping his information private.
Here is Leonie’s letter, written 12/20/13:
Dear folks,
I have good news to report! Yesterday, Sheldon Silver, Speaker of the NYS Assembly, along with Education Chair Cathy Nolan and fifty Democratic Assemblymembers sent a letter to Commissioner King, urging him to put a halt to inBloom.
“It is our job to protect New York’s children. In this case, that means protecting their personally identifiable information from falling into the wrong hands,” said Silver. “Until we are confident that this information can remain protected, the plan to share student data with InBloom must be put on hold.”
Why is this important? Because Speaker Silver and the Democrats in the Assembly appoint the Board of Regents, as the Daily News noted. The Regents control education policy in New York, and appoint the commissioner.
We have begun to make real headway in the past year against inBloom, but we need your support so we can continue the fight for student privacy and smaller classes in the public schools.
We count on donations from individuals like you as our main source of funding. If you appreciate our work and want it to continue and grow stronger, please give a tax-deductible contribution right now by clicking here: http://www.nycharities.org/donate/c_donate.asp?CharityCode=1757 or sending a check to the address below.
I am proud to have been called “the nation’s foremost parent expert on inBloom and the current threat to student data privacy.” We were the first advocacy group in the nation to sound the alarm about inBloom’s plan to create a multi-state database to be stored on a vulnerable data cloud run by Amazon.com with an operating system built by Rupert Murdoch’s Amplify. The explicit goal of inBloom was to package this information in an easily digestible form and offer it up to data-mining vendors without parental consent.
In February, inBloom formally launched as a separate corporation, and nine states were listed as “partners.” We worked hard to get the word out through blogging, personal outreach to parent activists and the mainstream media. After protests erupted in states throughout the country, inBloom’s “partners” pulled out. Now, eight out of these states have severed all ties with inBloom or put their data sharing plans on indefinite hold.
Sadly, as of yesterday, New York education officials were still intent on sharing with inBloom a complete statewide set of personal data for all public school students– including names, addresses, phone numbers, test scores and grades, disabilities, health conditions, disciplinary records and more. To stop this, we helped to organize a lawsuit on behalf of NYC parents which will be heard in state court on January 10 in Albany (note the new date), asking for an immediate injunction to block the state’s plan. (The state has delayed the hearing in order to gain more time to respond to our legal briefs.)
In addition, we will continue our work on the critical issue of class size. As a result of our reports, testimonies and public outreach, we have been able to shine a bright light on what many consider to be the most shameful aspect of Mayor Bloomberg’s education legacy: the fact that class sizes in NYC have increased sharply over the last six years and are now the largest in the early grades since 1998. More on this issue is in my Indypendent article just published, called Grading the Education Mayor
Class sizes have increased every year, despite the fact that the Campaign for Fiscal Equity case was supposedly “settled” by a state law in 2007 that required NYC to reduce class sizes in all grades. As a result, 86% of NYC principals say they are unable to provide a quality education because classes are too large. Parents say that smaller classes are their top priority according to the Department of Education’s own surveys. There is no more critical need than smaller classes if the city’s children are to have an equitable chance to learn.
But class size is not just a critical issue in NYC public schools. Because of budget cuts, class sizes have risen sharply throughout the state and the nation as a whole. In more than half of all states, per-pupil funding is lower than in 2008 and school districts have cut 324,000 jobs.
At the same time, more and more money is being spent by billionaires and venture philanthropists on bogus “studies” to try to convince states and districts that class size doesn’t matter and public funds should be spent instead on outsourcing education into private hands – despite much rigorous research showing the opposite to be true.
With vendors trying to grab your child’s data in the name of providing “personalized” instruction – a euphemism that really means instruction delivered via computers and data-mining software in place of real-life teachers giving meaningful feedback in a class small enough to make this possible — our efforts are more crucial than ever before.
Please make a donation so that our work can continue and be even more effective in 2014.
Thanks for your support and Happy New Year,
Leonie Haimson
Executive Director
Class Size Matters
124 Waverly Pl.
New York, NY 10011
212-674-7320
Big Data, Internet Surveillance, and 4th Amendment.
parents and eligible students annually of their rights underFERPA
www.edu-cyberpg.com/Technology/Big-Data.html

Privacy Concerns over selling K-12 Student Data information is a common practice.
Department’s experience administering FERPA and the current
www.edu-cyberpg.com/Technology/PRIVACY_INFORMATION.html

Untitled Document
Institutions are beginning to explore the connection between FERPA
www.edu-cyberpg.com/Internet/Distance-Learning-Higher-Ed-Faculty-Obligati…

Educational CyberPlayGround: Children’s Rights and K-12 Students rights to…
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) http://www.epic.org/privacy/
www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/children-rights.html

New Teacher Resources and Training: Back to School
Act of 1974 (FERPA).. more] Bill Gates arrested in 1977 for
www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/newteacher.html

K-12 Eductaion School Administrators fail to understand the proper use of…
FERPA does not give permission to teachers to give children’s
www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/admin.html
 

iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED

iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED

https://jscholarship.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/36569
Author: Brocker, Matthew; Checkoway, Stephen
Abstract: The ubiquitous webcam indicator LED is an important privacy feature which provides a visual cue that the camera is turned on. We describe how to disable the LED on a class of Apple internal iSight webcams used in some versions of MacBook laptops and iMac desktops. This enables video to be captured without any visual indication to the user and can be accomplished entirely in user space by an unprivileged (non- root) application. The same technique that allows us to disable the LED, namely reprogramming the firmware that runs on the iSight, enables a virtual machine escape whereby malware running inside a virtual machine reprograms the camera to act as a USB Human Interface Device (HID) keyboard which executes code in the host operating system. We build two proofs-of-concept: (1) an OS X application, iSeeYou, which demonstrates capturing video with the LED disabled; and (2) a virtual machine escape that launches Terminal.app and runs shell commands. To defend against these and related threats, we build an OS X kernel extension, iSightDefender, which prohibits the modification of the iSight’s firmware from user space.
Date: 2013-12-11 Series: Department of Computer Science, December 2013;
Technical Report 13-02

Harriton High School Used Apple Laptop Webcams To SPY On Students At Home

The school district acknowledged it took nearly 60,000 snapshots from student computers, without their knowledge, from September 2008 to February 2010. The district has admitted that the LANrev system it used had a program called TheftTrack that could snap webcam photos, take screenshots and record IP addresses every 15 minutes.

NASA – MEET ED STONE Intersteller Human Race space traveler

Through the Eyes of Scientists — Meet Edward Stone

Edward Stone describes how he was always interested in what was new as a young man and how space physics got his attention.
When the Atomic Age Began it was a lot of fun!
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KsJhvm7D_Q&w=560&h=315]
Aug 4, 2013
INTERVIEW WITH DR. ED STONE (Project Scientist)
Professor of Physics and Project Scientist Dr. Ed Stone discusses the success of the Voyager mission.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJ1sKKQQKQc&w=560&h=315]
 

Congrats to Ed Stone who took USA to Interstellar Space

Voyager Project Scientist Honored by NASA–Via Stephen Colbert

MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
PASADENA, CALIF. 91109 TELEPHONE 818-354-5011
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

2013-349
December 4, 2013

VOYAGER PROJECT SCIENTIST HONORED BY NASA–VIA STEPHEN COLBERT

Galactic commander and talk show host Stephen "Tiberius" Colbert presented Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA's Voyager mission, with a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Stone was a guest on Colbert's show on Dec. 3, 2013.

Galactic commander and talk show host Stephen “Tiberius” Colbert presented Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA’s Voyager mission, with a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Stone was a guest on Colbert’s show on Dec. 3, 2013. Image Credit: Courtesy of K. Long › larger image

Against the backdrop of an image of Saturn's rings taken by NASA's Voyager mission, project scientist Ed Stone describes the 36-year journey of the two Voyager spacecraft. Stone was a guest on the Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013.

Against the backdrop of an image of Saturn’s rings taken by NASA’s Voyager mission, project scientist Ed Stone describes the 36-year journey of the two Voyager spacecraft. Stone was a guest on the Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013. Image Credit: Courtesy of K. Long › larger image

Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA's Voyager mission, stands with his NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and accompanying certificate. He received the award on the talk show The Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013.

Ed Stone, the project scientist of NASA’s Voyager mission, stands with his NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and accompanying certificate. He received the award on the talk show The Colbert Report on Dec. 3, 2013. Image Credit: Courtesy of K. Long › larger image

As if NASA’s Voyager mission didn’t have enough firsts in its 36-year journey, what with sending the first spacecraft to Uranus, Neptune and, most recently, interstellar space! Now, it has another first back here on Earth: on last night’s episode of the Colbert Report (12/3/13), host Stephen Colbert floated across the stage in a spacesuit worthy of a1950s-era sci-fi movie and presented Voyager Project Scientist Ed Stone with a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. The prestigious award honors Stone for his work as project scientist of the venerable Voyager spacecraft since 1972.
“I was on the Colbert Report to talk about what I think of as humankind’s greatest — and certainly most extensive — journey of exploration, and I certainly didn’t expect the host to hand me an award,” said Stone, a professor of physics at the California Institute of Technology and former director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. “That surprise on my face was real.”
The NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal is the highest honor for a non-government individual. The citation, put forth by NASA’s associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, John Grunsfeld, commended Stone “for a lifetime of extraordinary scientific achievement and outstanding leadership of space science missions, and for his exemplary sharing of the exciting results with the public.”
Stone grew up in Burlington, Iowa, and attended Burlington Junior College and the University of Chicago. He was inspired to enter the fields of planetary science and space exploration by the launch of Sputnik in 1957, and his career has spanned the space age.
Stone has been a member of the Caltech faculty since 1967. In 1972, he became the Voyager project scientist, and he has the distinction of serving as Voyager’s one-and-only project scientist. He has seen the two spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, through the planetary encounters of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune and is now eagerly poring through the data coming back from Voyager 1, now exploring interstellar space.
While serving as director of JPL from 1991 to 2001, Stone oversaw numerous NASA projects, such as Galileo’s mission around Jupiter, the launch of the Cassini mission to Saturn, a new generation of Earth science satellites and the successful Pathfinder landing on Mars.
Stone’s current projects also include serving as vice chair of the board of directors of the Thirty Meter Telescope project, which is preparing to build the most advanced and powerful optical telescope to date.
A clip of last night’s show is online at: http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/430941/december-03-2013/ed-stone . The clip showing Ed Stone receiving the award is athttp://www.colbertnation.com/the-colbert-report-videos/430942/december-03-2013/sign-off—honoring-ed-stone.
A Q&A about Stone and Voyager 1’s arrival in interstellar space is online at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/interstellarvoyager/q-and-a/
The Voyager spacecraft were built and continue to be operated by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, Calif. Caltech manages JPL for NASA. The Voyager missions are a part of NASA’s Heliophysics System Observatory, sponsored by the Heliophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington.
For more information about Voyager, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/voyager and http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov.
Jia-Rui Cook 818-354-0850
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
jccook@jpl.nasa.gov
Silent Ambassador

Computer Wonder Woman Stand Strong

 

Computer Wonder Woman

Great ad on women vs. men in power positions.
70% of men think that women need to downplay their personality to be accepted. Double standards hold women back. Because when you stand strong, you shine.

[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround NASA STEM Education

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series
Curious about our nearest star, water on Mars, the first trip to Pluto and other wonders of the universe? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. ET and is followed by a question-and-answer session. A Discovery Station activity will take place at 4 p.m. prior to each lecture. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.

Dec. 7, 2013 — Oh, Swear Not by the Inconstant Sun
For 50 years, the Smithsonian monitored changes in the sun’s power. Secretary Charles Greeley Abbott asserted that solar variations could influence weather patterns and crop yields. What was he detecting? Dr. David DeVorkin will explore the inconstant nature of the sun.
Dec. 14, 2013 — First Mission to Pluto: The Origins and Voyage of New Horizons
In July 2015, New Horizons will become the first spacecraft to fly through the Pluto system. Dr. Michael Neufeld will discuss the goal of this mission and the promise of new science from it.
Jan. 11, 2014 — Solar Loops: Tackling a 40-Year-Old Mystery
The loops that cover the sun’s outer atmosphere have been studied for over 40 years, but their basic properties remain unknown. Astrophysicist Henry “Trae” Winter will discuss the attempts to unravel these mysteries.
For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visithttp://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.
Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-1000.
The Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series is made possible by a grant from NASA.
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2014 RASC-AL Robo-Ops Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2014 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Exploration Robo-Ops, also known as RASC-AL Robo-Ops, competition. This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students.
The RASC-AL Robo-Ops contest challenges participants to build a planetary rover prototype and demonstrate its capabilities in field tests at NASA’s Johnson Space Center’s Rock Yard. Up to three members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to Johnson Space Center for the onsite testing. The remaining team members will stay behind at the local university to conduct mission control tasks. The prototype rovers will be tele-operated by the mission control team members and must negotiate a series of obstacles while accomplishing a variety of tasks that include sample collection and acquisition. The only information available to the rover controller to perform the required tasks will be information transmitted through onboard rover video camera(s) or other onboard sensors.
Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed project by Dec. 8, 2013. The RASC-AL Robo-Ops Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select as many as eight teams to compete against each other at the Rock Yard in June 2014.
The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.
For more information about this competition, visithttp://www.nianet.org/RoboOps.
If you have questions about this competition, please contact Stacy Dees at stacy.dees@nianet.org or Shelley Spears at shelley.spears@nianet.org.
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Free Education Webinar Series from NASA Educator Professional Development

NASA Educator Professional Development is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA Education Specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources to bring NASA into your classroom.
Exploring the Engineering Design Process: An Introduction
Audience:
 Grades 3-8 and Informal
Event Date: 
Dec. 9, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Attend this 60-minute webinar and learn how to engage students in the engineering design process through NASA resources. The resources provide opportunities for addressing national science and mathematics learning standards as well as the Next Generation Science Standards.
Earth and Mars: An Atmospheric Perspective
Audience: 
In-service, Pre-service, Informal and Home School Educators
Event Date: Dec. 11, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Attend this 60-minute Web seminar and learn the key components of atmospheres that NASA used to safely land the newest and largest rover, Curiosity, on the surface of Mars.
Physics Resources for Elementary Educators
Audience: 
K-5 and Informal Educators
Event Date: Dec. 12, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Explore grades K-5 NASA resources designed to help you teach physics concepts.
For more information about these webinars and to register online, visit https://paragon-tec.adobeconnect.com/admin/show-event-catalog.
Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to John Entwistle at john.d.entwistle@nasa.gov.
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NES Web Seminar — Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space
NASA Explorer Schools and the National Science Teachers Association are hosting a 90-minute live professional development Web seminar for educators on Dec. 10, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. EST. The seminar focuses on human physiology. Obtain information about the effect microgravity has on the physiology of astronauts and learn about the countermeasures NASA uses to help overcome these effects when they return to Earth.
Outer space is an exciting part of our lives and promises to be an even more exciting part of the future for your students. It provides scientists with a unique laboratory, allowing scientific studies never possible in the history of civilization. Future space missions will continue to involve sending humans into space. But after extended stays in microgravity, astronauts must return safely to Earth and lead normal, healthy lives.
This seminar will provide instruction on how to integrate the Skeletal System: Human Physiology in Space lesson into your curriculum. There are two classroom activities in this lesson focusing on the effects of spaceflight on human physiology.
Both activities provide opportunities for incorporating national science, technology, and mathematics learning standards into the curriculum as well as addressing high school Next Generation Science Standards.
This seminar will be repeated on March 4, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visithttp://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/symposia_seminars/NES4/webseminar28.aspx.
To learn more about the NASA Explorer Schools project, visit http://explorerschools.nasa.gov.
Email any questions about this opportunity to the NASA Explorer Schools help desk at NASA-Explorer-Schools@mail.nasa.gov.
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Green Strides Webinar Series

The U.S. Department of Education presents the Green Strides Webinar Series. These webinars feature experts from various federal programs. The webinars are free, and events are scheduled throughout the 2013-2014 school year.
The next webinar takes place on Dec. 11, 2013, at 4 p.m. EST.
For more information and registration, visithttp://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/green-strides/webinar.html.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed toGreen.Ribbon.Schools@ed.gov.
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National Air and Space Museum Super Science Saturday Events
Join the National Air and Space Museum on the second Saturday of each month during 2013 for Super Science Saturday at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Through demonstrations and hands-on activities, visitors of all ages will become immersed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics topics related to aviation and space exploration. Each event takes place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Admission is free, and parking is $15.
Upcoming topics include:
Dec. 14, 2013 — The Wright Brothers
Jan. 11, 2014 — From the Wright Brothers to the Right Stuff
Feb. 8, 2014 — Scientists & Inventors
March 8, 2014 — Space Shuttle
For more information, visithttp://airandspace.si.edu/events/superscience/.
Questions about this series of lectures should be directed to nasmpubliclectures@si.edu.
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NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Small Bodies: Comets ISON

Fly-by asteroids, asteroids disintegrating over Earth, fly-by comets have made 2013 an exciting year for studying and observing small solar system bodies. Join NASA’s Dr. Claudia Alexander, Rosetta project scientist as she discusses Comet ISON and the Rosetta mission in a live teleconference on Dec. 18, 2013, at 1 p.m. EST. Dr. Alexander will discuss different types of small bodies and answer student questions.
If your class is interested in participating in this event via live video conferencing, contact Lyle Tavernier atlyle.tavernier@jpl.nasa.gov.
To view a live webcast of the event and submit questions via email, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/programs/national/dln/webcast/webcast.html.
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Historical NASA Space Artifacts Available for Educational Use

NASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions, museums and other organizations to screen and request historical artifacts of significance to spaceflight. This is the 20th screening of artifacts since 2009.
Eligible schools, universities, museums, libraries and planetariums may view the artifacts and request specific items through Dec. 23, 2013. Online registrations should include an assigned Department of Education number. Registration also can be made through the State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) office in their state. For instructions, registration, and to view and make requests for artifacts online, visithttp://gsaxcess.gov/NASAWel.htm.
The artifacts are free of charge and are offered “as-is.” Organizations must cover shipping costs and any handling fees. Shipping fees on smaller items will be relatively inexpensive, while larger items may involve extensive disassembly, preparation, shipping and reassembly costs. NASA will work closely with eligible organizations to address any unique handling costs.
Questions about this opportunity should be directed toGSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.
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2014 NASA Student Airborne Research Program
The NASA Airborne Science Program invites highly motivated undergraduate students currently in their junior year to apply for the NASA Student Airborne Research Program, also known as SARP, 2014. The program provides students with hands-on research experience in all aspects of a major scientific campaign, from detailed planning on how to achieve mission objectives to formal presentation of results and conclusions to peers and others. Students will assist in the operation of airborne instruments onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft.
The program takes place in summer 2014. Preparatory information and data analysis will take place at the University of California, Irvine. Instrument and flight preparations, and the research flights themselves, will occur at NASA’s Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif.
Successful applicants will be awarded a stipend and meals allowance for eight weeks of participation in the program. Round-trip travel to California, housing and transportation will be provided.
The deadline for applications is Feb. 7, 2014.
For more information and to download the program application, visit http://www.nserc.und.edu/sarp/sarp-2014.
Specific questions about the program should be directed to SARP2014@nserc.und.edu.
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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Undergraduate STEM Research Scholarship
The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering undergraduate research scholarships of up to $8,500 to encourage talented individuals to conduct research in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM, fields.
Applicants must participate in an active faculty-mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Student stipends and research support totaling $4,000 during the academic year and $4,500 during a summer semester are available.
These one-year awards are nonrenewable and based on student academic merit, quality of the research proposal and alignment of research with the goals of NASA and the aerospace sector. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.
The deadline for submitting applications is Feb.10, 2014.
For more information, visithttp://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/undergrad/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.
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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate STEM Research Fellowship
The Virginia Space Grant Consortium’s Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program provides fellowships of $5,000 in add-on support to graduate students to supplement and enhance basic research support. The objective of this science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, research fellowship opportunity is to encourage talented individuals to pursue careers in STEM industries that support NASA’s mission.
Participants in the Graduate STEM Research Fellowship Program must take part in an active faculty‐mentored research experience that aligns with the aerospace sector and meets NASA’s mission. Awards are made annually and are renewable for one year for students making satisfactory academic and research progress.
This is a competitive fellowship program, and awards are based on merit recognizing high academic achievement and promise. Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled at one of the five Virginia Space Grant member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.
The deadline for submitting applications is Feb.10, 2014.
For more information about this opportunity and to apply online, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/gradfellow/. Please email any questions about this opportunity torkashiri@odu.edu.
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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, is offering renewable scholarships to sophomore undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics, or STEM. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000 and are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group enrolled fulltime at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.
The STEM Bridge Program bridges students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s Mission.
This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit, quality of interest essay as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to students’ interest in STEM areas.
The deadline for submitting applications is March 17, 2014.
For more information, visithttp://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.
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2014-15 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium, or VSGC, encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarship opportunities to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System, or VCCS.
These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA’s missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.
Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the VCCS.
The deadline for submitting applications is March 17, 2014.
For more information, visithttp://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to rkashiri@odu.edu.
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NASA Exploration Design Challenge
Students from Kindergarten through 12th grade will have the opportunity to play a unique role in the future of human spaceflight through participation in NASA’s Exploration Design Challenge, or EDC. NASA EDC invites students around the world to think and act like scientists in order to overcome one of the major hurdles of deep space long-duration exploration — the dangers associated with space radiation. Students taking part in the challenge will discover how to plan and design improved radiation shielding aboard the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, currently being developed by NASA, Lockheed Martin and other partners to carry astronauts to space, venturing farther than humans have ever gone before.
Through a series of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, engagement activities, students in grades K-8 will analyze different materials that simulate space radiation shielding and recommend materials that best block radiation and protect astronauts. Students in grades 9-12 will think and act like engineers as they apply what they learn to design shielding to protect a sensor on the Orion crew module from space radiation. After a review of the design solutions submitted by teams in the grades 9-12 challenge, five finalist teams will be selected and matched with a mentor from NASA to test their designs in a virtual simulator. The winning team will build a prototype radiation shield that will be analyzed and submitted to Lockheed Martin for flight certification on the inaugural flight of the Orion Exploration Flight Test, or EFT-1.
The five U.S. finalist teams from the grades 9-12 challenge will be invited to attend the EFT-1 launch, currently scheduled for November 2014. The names of all students, grades K-12, participating in the NASA EDC will fly aboard the spacecraft as honorary virtual crewmembers for Orion’s first flight. The deadline to register students for the virtual crew is July 31, 2014.
For more information and to register online, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/spacelife/explorationdesign/overview/index.html#.UdLvoBZU3dI.
For more information about Orion, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/orion.
Email any questions about this opportunity tonasaedc@nianet.org.
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MissionSTEM Diversity & Inclusion Leadership Video Series Topic 2
On behalf of NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, the NASA Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity is pleased to post the second set of videos in the MissionSTEM Diversity & Inclusion Leadership Series.
This new set of videos features top university leaders describing specific strategies they have used to increase the participation of underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. The video series supports the national goal of educating one million STEM graduates needed in the coming decades to bolster innovation and productivity, educate our citizens and expand our economy.
Over the coming months, the Series will offer several additional diversity and inclusion perspectives and promising practices. Each new set of videos will emphasize a new topic, with previous topics still available on the website. NASA invites you to watch the videos and offer your comments and/or ideas on this critical area for national discussion. By sharing these success stories, NASA strives to help create more diverse STEM education communities and, in turn, advance our Nation’s leadership role in cutting edge technology.
For more information and to view the video series, visit http://missionstem.nasa.gov/diversityInclusionLeadrshp.html.