Sascha Meinrath should be New FCC Chairman @saschameinrath

“You can’t have an objective chairman of the FCC that’s got 20 years of their life invested in being the head lobbyist for industry,” Sascha Meinrath of the New America Foundation said in an interview.

Sascha Meinrath

“You can’t have an objective chairman of the FCC that’s got 20 years of their life invested in being the head lobbyist for industry,” Sascha Meinrath of the New America Foundation said in an interview.

Vice President and Director, Open Technology Institute

Sascha Meinrath is vice president of the New America Foundation and director of the Open Technology Institute. In 2012 he was named one of the top 100 in Newsweek’s Digital Power Index and he has been described as a “community Internet pioneer” and an “entrepreneurial visionary.” He is a well-known expert on community wireless networks, municipal broadband, and telecommunications policy. In 2009 he was named one of Ars Technica’s Tech Policy “People to Watch” and is also the 2009 recipient of the Public Knowledge IP3 Award for excellence in public interest advocacy.
Sascha founded the Commotion Wireless Project (a.k.a., the “Internet-in-a-Suitcase”) and, along with Vint Cerf, is the co-founder of Measurement Lab (M-Lab), a distributed server platform for researchers around the world to deploy Internet measurement tools, advance network research, and empower the public with useful information about their broadband connections. He coordinates the Open Source Wireless Coalition, a global partnership of wireless integrators, researchers, implementors and companies dedicated to the development of open source, interoperable, low-cost wireless technologies. Sascha has worked with Free Press, the Cooperative Association for Internet Data Analysis (CAIDA), the Acorn Active Media Foundation, the Ethos Group, and the CUWiN Foundation.

 
BEST GOVERNMENT PRACTICES
December 18, 2006 By Sascha Meinrath
The problem of emergency communications and disaster recovery is often not the lack of resources, but lack of coordination. After Katrina, Sascha Meinrath coordinated the Community Wireless Emergency Response Initiative. The following offers some of what he and others learned about emergency communications.
Contrary to popular perception, the problem of disaster recovery is often not the lack of resources, but lack of coordination.
One key component to successful emergency response is a dynamic, direct and robust communications network — a structure the United States had been missing. Key decision-makers turned a deaf ear to the problem until Hurricane Katrina made such an ostrich-stance untenable, and the United States had to learn the lesson the hard way. Yet a year later, improvements have been incredibly modest. During the next major disaster, experts say we should expect more of the same — a lack of coherent, rapidly deployable, interoperable communications networks for first responders and the communities they serve.