Olympics

The Economist, have been intrigued by the business aspects of the Games. There is an interesting hierarchy of sponsors. Organizers not willing to pay for play

Olympics

As the Summer Olympics begin in London, there is some well-founded
anxiety about the long-term benefits of hosting such a grand venture
Business and the Olympics: Victors and spoils
http://www.economist.com/node/21559326
London Olympics: Are organizers not willing to pay for play?
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/music/posts/la-et-ms-0724-olympics-
music-20120724,0,4734546.story
Why The Olympics Aren’t Good For Us, And How They Can Be
http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/24/opinion/opinion-olympics-future-
perryman/index.html
BBC Sport: Olympics
http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/olympics/2012/
London 2012
http://www.olympic.org/london-2012-summer-olympics
Opening Ceremony of 1948 London Olympics
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13391235
This Friday, the Olympics will return to London for the first time since
1948, and the entire world will be watching. This major sporting event
itself will be closely watched by the usual suspects (sports media, pundits,
and the like), but urban studies types will be most interested in watching
after the fact to see how the infrastructure improvements created for the
Olympics hold up over time. A number of commentators, including the folks at
The Economist, have been intrigued by the business aspects of the Games. In
an article in this week’s edition, they reported that the British
government’s budget for the games is around $14.5 billion. In addition, the
International Olympic Committee has raised $4.87 billion in broadcast fees
for the Olympic cycle that includes the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver,
B.C. They also noted that there is an interesting hierarchy of sponsors. And
what of the broad benefits that might accrue to the host country? The
findings are mixed: Victor Matheson of the College of the Holy Cross noted
that organizers of big sporting events tend to overestimate the benefits and
underestimate the costs. Illustrating this point, noted academics Bent
Flyvbjerg and Allison Stewart of Oxford University recently released a
working paper noting that every Olympiad since 1960 has gone over budget.
This may increase anxiety for the average Briton. [KMG]
The first link leads to The Economist article which offers a cost-benefit
analysis of hosting the London Summer Olympics. The second link will take
users to a piece from the Los Angeles Times about the pay scale for major
pop music acts that will be appearing at the Games. Moving along, the third
link will whisk visitors to a nice editorial piece by Mark Perryman on how
the Olympics could be improved the next go-round. The fourth link will lead
interested parties to the BBC’s site dedicated to coverage of the Summer
Olympics. The fifth link will take guests to the official London Summer
Olympics, complete with detailed schedule, venue information, and video
clips. The last link leads to a wonderful newsreel of the opening ceremonies
of the 1948 Olympic Games, which were also held in London.
Victor Matheson of the College of the Holy Cross

Google Wallet payment subscription service Fails

Your Google Storage plan didn’t automatically renew -The Google Storage Team sucks.

The other night I got a message from Google
saying that because of a credit card issue,
my storage had been ‘downgraded.’
The number of my emails appeared to have
dropped by 30,000.
This was most alarming.
I emailed Vint Cerf at Google and he got right on it.
He established that nothing was deleted.
Thanks again, Vint.
A kindly followup from Julio Alvarez at Google said:
>In this case, there was an error processing your Google Wallet payment instrument causing the subscription to cancel. This is a known issue affecting a very small number of users as we migrate to a newer subscription service.
>
>In any case, we provide 30 days of grace storage at the start of the subscription end date to give users time to escalate in the rare event an error happens.
Their initial, alarming message (below) said nothing about a grace period or correctiing the situation.
(In my alarm, I had read the wrong figure for the number
of remaining emails.)
Not fun.
Ted
———- Forwarded message ———-
From:  <no-reply@google.com>
Date: Mon, Jul 23, 2012 at 7:28 PM
Subject: Your Google Storage plan didn’t automatically renew
To:ted
Hi there,
Our records indicate that you’ve elected to renew your Google Paid
Storage subscription for an additional year. However, we were unable
to process the payment using the default credit card provided in your
Google Checkout account.
At this time, your quota has been downgraded to the Basic Plan. If you
would like to continue using paid storage, you can upgrade your
account at any time by visiting your account management page. If you
have any questions, please visit our help center.
-The Google Storage Team


Theodor Holm Nelson PhD
Designer-Generalist, The Internet Archive
Visiting Professor, University of Southampton
My recent books, POSSIPLEX and ‘Geeks Bearing Gifts’,
are available from Lulu.com and Amazon.
“Ted Nelson is an idealistic troublemaker
who coined the word ‘hypertext’ in the sixties,
and continues to fight for a completely different
computer world.”

The Stations That Spoke Your Language: Radio and the Yiddish American Cultural Renaissance

FREE Symposium: September 6, and Friday, September 7, 2012, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress

The Stations That Spoke Your Language: Radio and the Yiddish American Cultural Renaissance

Symposium: September 6-7, 2012
Montpellier Room, Madison Building, Library of Congress
101 Independence Ave., SE
Washington, DC
On Thursday, September 6, and Friday, September 7, 2012, the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress will present a free public symposium on The Stations That Spoke Your Language: Radio and the Yiddish-American Cultural Renaissance. Leading Yiddish language and culture experts will join media scholars and Library of Congress specialists to address Yiddish radio in America: its history and cultural impact, its continuing influence on American media, and its multifaceted legacy. The symposium marks the Center’s recent acquisition of the Henry Sapoznik Collection of more than one thousand historic Yiddish radio broadcasts from the 1920s through the 1950s, and is presented in collaboration with the Hebraic Section of the Library’s African and Middle Eastern Division.
The symposium is free of charge, but space is limited. Reservations are strongly recommended. Please contact Nancy Groce at ngro@loc.gov to reserve seats.
For more information on topics, scholars, and to review the schedule, please visit: http://www.loc.gov/folklife/Symposia/yiddishradio/index.html

News literacy programs — How do you find the truth?

without a well-informed public, you get . . . what we have: a culture that rewards ignorance and treats discourse as a blood sport. All freedoms depend first on freedom of speech, but not all speech is equivalent, no matter how many hits a Web site boasts or how many viewers ages 25-54 tune in to a given TV show.

News Literacy Programs

How Do You Find the Truth
News literacy programs provide some hope at least for a more sophisticated consumer.
The News literacy movement is aimed at teaching young people how to think critically and judge the quality of information.

The kids born since the 1990’s have spent a frightening percentage of their lives consuming data in a random world of tweets, blogs and food-fight commentators, for whom fame is a goal and reality a show. Once accustomed to such high-velocity infotainment, how does one develop tolerance for the harder reads and the deeper conversations?
THE MOST IMPORTANT READING SKILL IS KNOWING HOW TO READ BETWEEN THE LINES.


It’s a modest start, but learning to read critically is no less important than reading itself — a simple truth with which even incumbent politicians could agree

We can know that that extreme partisanship is a function of . . . dumbness?
Is that the fault or the goal of the Department of Education? Yes it is.
Dumbness is also all about our media.



Retiring Democratic Rep. Gary L. Ackerman of New York. Reflecting on his 30 years in Washington, Ackerman was asked to comment on the relative lack of comity on Capitol Hill.
Q: Did it ever exist?
A: Not really, he said, but at least Democrats and Republicans used to be friends.
A: Today, crossing the aisle is tantamount to treason. The problem isn’t only Washington but society as a whole.
A: “I think the people have gotten dumber.”
A:  “I don’t know that I would’ve said that out loud pre-my announcement that I was going to be leaving.”
A:
“We now give broadcast licenses to philosophies instead of people. People get confused and think there is no difference between news and entertainment. People who project themselves as journalists on television don’t know the first thing about journalism. They are just there stirring up a hockey game.”

Two leaders in the movement are the News Literacy Project (NLP), led by Alan Miller, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former Los Angeles Times investigative journalist, and the Center for News Literacy (CNL) at Stony Brook University.
The NLP focuses on school programs for middle and high school students. The group’s staff includes 22 news organizations and 200 journalists who donate their time and talents to work with students. Both groups try to answer the question: How do you find the truth?, and the CNL identifies news as “the oxygen of democracy.” Indeed, without a well-informed public, you get . . . what we have: a culture that rewards ignorance and treats discourse as a blood sport. All freedoms depend first on freedom of speech, but not all speech is equivalent, no matter how many hits a Web site boasts or how many viewers ages 25-54 tune in to a given TV show.  ~ Kathleen Parker

<more>

Yahoo shocked the world last week by hiring Mayer away from Google.

The following are a few of the laws of the jungle out there for Women Entrepreneurs

Yahoo shocked the world last week by hiring Mayer away from Google.

There’s a lot of interesting tidbits in this thread, most notably the  one about how her getting pregnant is an admission she’s “done,” but I  found this one most interesting.
Investors

Women Entrepreneurs

The following are a few of the laws of the jungle out there for Women Entrepreneurs
Continue reading “Yahoo shocked the world last week by hiring Mayer away from Google.”

Washington State 'Cyberstalking' Case Based on Unconstitutional Law

Electronic Frontier Foundation Statute Criminalizes Speech in Violation of the First Amendment

Electronic Frontier Foundation Media Release
For Immediate Release: Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Washington State ‘Cyberstalking’ Case Based on
Unconstitutional Law

Contact:
Hanni Fakhoury
Staff Attorney
Electronic Frontier Foundation
hanni@eff.org
+1 415 436-9333 x117

Statute Criminalizes Speech in Violation of the First
Amendment

Continue reading “Washington State 'Cyberstalking' Case Based on Unconstitutional Law”

Educational CyberPlayGround NetHappenings

NetHappenings

Educational CyberPlayground NetHappenings

News and Resources

 
1) Congress considers prosecutions of reporters over leaked information
In response to New York Times stories that relied on leaks of sensitive national-security information, a House of Representatives panel on Wednesday discussed legislation that could allow journalists to be prosecuted for disclosing such information.
 
2)  Cross-border policing provokes sovereignty worries
U.S. officers have powers to make arrests in Canada
Something else disgusting gets buried in a must-pass spending bill.
When the Conservative government passed its controversial omnibus budget bill last month, it included new powers for certain U.S. law enforcement agents that critics say could have ramifications for Canadian sovereignty.
The Integrated Cross Border Law Enforcement Operations Act now makes it possible for American officers to cross the border into Canada where, as the act states, they have “the same power to enforce an act of Parliament as a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.” This means they’ll be armed and have the powers to arrest suspects in Canadian territory.
3) Researchers to Create World Database at CCS for Nervous System Repair
http://ow.ly/cb23Z
4) New Homeland Security Laser Scanner Reads People At Molecular Level
http://ow.ly/cb2gV
5) ‘Security’ as pretext for patent enforcement
Instead of calling it what it is, Sprint calls it a “security fix” — which again reinforces the belief that “security” doesn’t always refer to hackers, theives, and criminals, but rather securing the profits and rights of others. Funny how semantics change.
Sprint Cripples Galaxy S III Via ‘Security Update’: Bye, Bye Universal Search
http://ow.ly/cb2Du

Fact-Check: How the NYPD Overstated Its Counterterrorism Record http://ow.ly/cb2HF
A review of the
list shows a much more complicated reality —